Profile cover photo
Profile photo
National Academy of Medicine
46 followers -
Leadership, innovation, and impact for a healthier future
Leadership, innovation, and impact for a healthier future

46 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Over the course of his 40-year career in the field of medicine, Arthur Hengerer has witnessed many mental health challenges among his physician colleagues at all stages of their careers.

Now, with his involvement in regulatory aspects of medicine, he is in a position to proactively address these challenges. Dr. Hengerer is devoting the rest of his career to diminishing the great stigma surrounding mental health issues so medical students and physicians can get the help they need in a safe environment. Read more: http://ow.ly/5OB930eE1LB
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The places we live, work, and play have a huge impact on our health.

Adverse community experiences, such as violence, racism, and poverty, can traumatize communities, acting as barriers to improving population health and health equity. Persistent community trauma plays a tremendous role in the health of communities. When people feel unsafe, they are less likely to use resources available to them (like parks and grocery stores) and businesses are less likely to invest in communities that are perceived as unsafe.

How can we address adverse community events in an effort to improve health outcomes? A new National Academy of Medicine discussion paper identifies strategies that communities can use to address trauma in highly impacted areas while also aligning with strategies that increase access to healthy food and opportunities for physical activity. http://bit.ly/2vsam31
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Antibiotics are used in many ways for disease treatment and prevention in both humans and animals. However, more than 70 years of antibiotic use have led to a significant increase in the number of antibiotic-resistant genes and bacteria. These antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes can lead to great harm in humans and animals because treatment options become scarce.

As antibiotic resistance continues to evolve, alternatives to antibiotics are more important than ever. A new National Academy of Medicine discussion paper summarizes many different alternatives to antibiotics in an effort to solve the antibiotic-resistance challenge we currently face. No one alternative will replace all uses of antibiotics, but a multifaceted approach can help: http://bit.ly/2uAHzZ7
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria is a concern for everyone. This bacteria can easily be transferred from animal to human during consumption and can sometimes be life threatening. In the 1990s, Denmark became one of the first countries to ban antimicrobial growth promoters in livestock and continues to lead the way in reducing antimicrobial usage and resistance in production animals. In a new National Academy of Medicine discussion paper, authors explore the history of antimicrobial use in production animals in Denmark and how monitoring the use of antimicrobials agents is leading to lower antimicrobial resistance levels than ever before: http://bit.ly/2eQcOdq
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
During times of health crises, the authoritative voices of public health officials serve as a way to calm the public, avoid perceptions of chaos, and build trust. The careful crafting of accurate, consistent, and meaningful messages are vital to ensuring that communities follow guidelines during times of health emergencies. Using principles of health literacy can help ensure that these messages are understood by everyone.

In our new discussion paper, authors use insights from health literacy to identify guidance for crafting high-quality messages during times of health emergencies to ensure these messages are accurate, specific, actionable, and easy for EVERYONE to understand. http://bit.ly/2vfNBw4
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Health-related information can be confusing. Many people struggle to understand information given to them by their doctors and other health care professionals. Too many words can make things seem more complicated than they actually are, leaving many patients lost about what they can do to improve their health.
How can art help patients and health care professionals understand each other better?

In our new commentary, authors suggest that art is an untapped resource that could allow health literacy efforts to be more effective and collective. Read their thoughts on why art is a timeless effort that offers us all a new and different way of reaching one another: http://bit.ly/2sQROFt
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Beginning soon!

Don't miss the live webcast of our first public meeting from our Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience!

Tune in now: http://ow.ly/xn6730dB8sv
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Calling artists of all kinds! Show us what health equity looks, feels, and sounds like to YOU!

What are the most important health challenges facing you and your community? Show us through art!

We are now accepting submissions for a nationwide community art project! The deadline for submission is September 4, 2017. Learn more: http://ow.ly/QRXd30dr5VW
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Health communication, health education, and health literacy are rooted in a common understanding of human communication. While it's clear that these fields are inextricably linked, they often operate separately and in siloes.

In a new discussion paper from the National Academy of Medicine, authors provide a call to action for health communication, health education, and health literacy to begin working together in collaboration toward their shared goals of enhancing human health, improving health outcomes, and reducing health disparities. Read more on why collaboration among these three fields is a win for everyone: http://bit.ly/2syO92Z
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Depression among medical residents is all too common. By some estimates, 43% of trainees experience depression. In a new National Academy of Medicine commentary, Breaking Silence, Breaking Stigma, authors encourage medical residents to share their stories in an effort to normalize the dialogue around mental illness. Download the commentary and read their thoughts on why sharing one’s experiences or thoughts in the open may be more valuable than a guarantee of anonymity that enables repression of those thoughts: http://ow.ly/qe5W30dlW4d
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded