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Creating Biomedical Technologies to Improve Health
Creating Biomedical Technologies to Improve Health

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Many older people who’ve survived a heart attack or stroke take low-dose aspirin every day to help prevent further cardiovascular problems. There is compelling evidence that this works. But should perfectly healthy older folks follow suit?

Most of us would have guessed “yes”—but the answer appears to be “no” when you consider the latest scientific evidence.

Learn more at the NIH Director's Blog:
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Walk into a dark room, and it takes a minute to make out the objects, from the wallet on the table to the sleeping dog on the floor. But after a few seconds, our eyes are able to adjust and see in the near-dark, thanks to a protein called rhodopsin found at the surface of certain specialized cells in the retina, the thin, vision-initiating tissue that lines the back of the eye.
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When cancers spread, or metastasize, from one part of the body to another, bone is a frequent and potentially devastating destination. Now, as you can see in this video, an NIH-funded research team has developed a new system that hopefully will provide us with a better understanding of what goes on when cancer cells invade bone. Learn more at the NIH Director's Blog:
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NIBIB-funded researchers generated stable lines of spinal cord neural stem cells in a laboratory dish. Once transplanted into a rat model of spinal cord injury, the cells enabled robust regeneration of functional neurons along the length of the spine. Learn more at NIBIB:
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CRISPR and other gene editing tools hold great promise for curing a wide range of devastating conditions caused by misspellings in DNA. Among the many looking to gene editing with hope are kids with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an uncommon and tragically fatal genetic disease in which their muscles—including skeletal muscles, the heart, and the main muscle used for breathing—gradually become too weak to function. Learn more at the NIH Director's Blog:
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The cost and time required to obtain a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan may be significantly reduced in the future, thanks to the application of artificial intelligence (AI) strategies. Learn more at NIBIB:
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For centuries, microscopes have brought to light the otherwise invisible world of the cell. But microscopes don’t typically visualize the dynamic world of the cell within a living system. Now, a team partially funded by NIH has developed a new hybrid imaging technology to produce amazing, live-action 3D movies of living cells in their more natural state. In this video, you’re looking at a human breast cancer cell (green) making its way through a blood vessel (purple) of a young zebrafish. Watch at the NIH Director's Blog:
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NIH Director Francis Collins announced yesterday his selection of Dr. Bruce Tromberg to lead the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at NIH. Dr. Tromberg is a pioneer in the field of biophotonics who has garnered significant academic and scientific achievements in a 30-year career at UC Irvine. Dr. Tromberg will begin the new post in January.
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For most people, pain eventually fades away as an injury heals. But for others, the pain persists beyond the initial healing and becomes chronic, hanging on for weeks, months, or even years. Now, we may have uncovered an answer to help explain why: subtle differences in a gene that controls how the body responds to stress. Learn more at the NIH Director's Blog:
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As a pioneer in cancer immunotherapy, Jim Allison has spent decades tackling major scientific challenges. So it’s interesting that Allison would consider one of the top five moments in his life jamming onstage with country star Willie Nelson. Yes, in addition to being a top-flight scientist at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Allison plays a mean harmonica. Learn more at the NIH Director's Blog:
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