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NIH researchers have identified a signature in tumor DNA that occurs in five different types of cancer. Learn more at the National Human Genome Research Institute:
NIH researchers have identified a DNA methylation signature in tumor DNA common to five types of cancer. The signature results from a chemical modification of DNA called methylation, which can control the expression of genes like a dimmer on a light switch. They hope this finding will spur ...
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Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis found a way to keep a cancerous tumor from growing by using nanoparticles of the main ingredient in common antacid tablets. Learn more at Washington University of St. Louis:
Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis use nanoparticle technology, applied to a drug found in most people's medicine cabinets, to chemically alter a cancer tumor and stop its growth.
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NIH-funded researchers are developing new technologies to help surgeons determine exactly where tumors end and healthy tissue begins. Learn more at NIH News in Health:
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How could deepening our understanding of hibernation help researchers improve human health? Learn more at the NIH Director's Blog:
When bears, bats, and other animals prepare to hibernate, they pack on fat at an impressive pace to almost double their weight. As they drift off into their winter slumber, their heart rates, breat...
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NIH and Chinese researchers conducted a pilot study showing that an ultrathin, skin-conforming sensor—resembling a peel-away tattoo—provides non-invasive, precise, and continuous monitoring of circulation, including blood flow within the smallest vessels. Learn more at NIBIB:
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Learn more about the Zika virus and it's apparent link to birth defects at the NIH Director's Blog:
Credit: Kraemer et al. eLife 2015;4:e08347 For decades, the mosquito-transmitted Zika virus was mainly seen in equatorial regions of Africa and Asia, where it caused a mild, flu-like illness and ra...
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Watch this bio-action flick about the spread of cancer that was recently featured in the American Society for Cell Biology’s 2015 Celldance video series at the NIH Director's Blog:
If you’re a fan of the Mission: Impossible spy thrillers, you might think that secret agent Ethan Hunt has done it all. But here’s a potentially life-saving mission that his force has yet to undert...
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Learn more about the overuse of antibiotics and some efforts to combat the negative effects at the NIH Director's Blog:
Without doubt, antibiotic drugs have saved hundreds of millions of lives from bacterial infections that would have otherwise been fatal. But their inappropriate use has led to the rise of antibioti...
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NIBIB-funded researchers and a team at the University of Washington have been able to predict which images patients were viewing, and when, with better than 95 percent accuracy. Learn more at Science Daily:
Using electrodes implanted in the temporal lobes of awake patients, scientists have decoded brain signals at nearly the speed of perception. Further, analysis of patients' neural responses to two categories of visual stimuli -- images of faces and houses -- enabled the scientists to subsequently predict which images the patients were viewing, and when, with better than 95 percent accuracy.
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Check out a winner in the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology's 2015 BioArt competition at the NIH Director's Blog:
To most people, the plant Arabidopsis thaliana might seem like just another pesky weed. But for plant biologists, this member of the mustard green family is a valuable model for studying a wide arr...
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Check out some of the top technical advances in imaging, optogenetics, single cell analysis, and CRISPR at The Scientist:
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A new advance from NIBIB-funded researchers at MIT, Boston Children’s Hospital and several other institutions may offer a way to fulfill the promise of islet cell transplantation. Learn more at MIT:
Encapsulated pancreatic cells offer possible new diabetes treatment.
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Have them in circles
135 people
karl robold's profile photo
정인호's profile photo
APA CyberMentors's profile photo
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Patty Buskuehl's profile photo
Abdulkerim Özkan's profile photo
Clip Sudteen's profile photo
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Creating Biomedical Technologies to Improve Health
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The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering is one of 27 Institutes and Centers that comprise the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The mission of NIBIB is to improve health by leading the development and accelerating the application of biomedical technologies. The Institute is committed to integrating the physical and engineering sciences with the life sciences to advance basic research and medical care.

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