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Creating Biomedical Technologies to Improve Health
Creating Biomedical Technologies to Improve Health

194 followers
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To our valued followers:

As you may have heard Google+ will be discontinued and we will be unable to use this service to update you about NIBIB news. Please continue to engage with us by using our other accounts Facebook or Twitter @NIBIBgov, YouTube NIBIBtv or join our listserv to receive updates at https://list.nih.gov/cgi-bin/wa.exe?SUBED1=NIBIB_LISTSERV&A=1.

Thank you for your years of interest and we hope you continue to follow NIBIB.
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Researchers have learned a lot in recent years about how six-plus feet of human DNA gets carefully packed into a tiny cell nucleus that measures less than .00024 of an inch. Under those cramped conditions, we’ve been learning more and more about how DNA twists, turns, and spatially orients its thousands of genes within the nucleus and what this positioning might mean for health and disease. Learn more at the NIH Director's Blog:
Building a 3D Map of the Genome
Building a 3D Map of the Genome
directorsblog.nih.gov
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How much exercise does it take to boost your memory skills? Possibly a lot less than you’d think, according to the results of a new study that examined the impact of light exercise on memory. Learn more at the NIH Director's Blog:
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Colds are just an occasional nuisance for many folks, but some individuals seem to come down with them much more frequently. Now, NIH-funded researchers have uncovered some new clues as to why. Learn more at the NIH Director's Blog:
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Bacteria are single-celled organisms that are too small to see in detail without the aid of a microscope. So you might not think that zooming in on a batch of bacteria would provide the inspiration for a museum-worthy sculpture. But, in fact, that’s exactly what you see in the image. Learn more at the NIH Director's Blog:
A Microbial Work of Art
A Microbial Work of Art
directorsblog.nih.gov
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Experts estimate that more than 5 million Americans may have Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. Previous research with mice has suggested that Alzheimer's creates a disruption in neurogenesis, the process of new neurons arising from progenitor cells, in the hippocampus. New research has found two ways to boost new nerve cell growth: with exercise and with a combination of treatments. Learn more at NIH Research Matters:
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Many older people who’ve survived a heart attack or stroke take low-dose aspirin every day to help prevent further cardiovascular problems. There is compelling evidence that this works. But should perfectly healthy older folks follow suit?

Most of us would have guessed “yes”—but the answer appears to be “no” when you consider the latest scientific evidence.

Learn more at the NIH Director's Blog:
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Walk into a dark room, and it takes a minute to make out the objects, from the wallet on the table to the sleeping dog on the floor. But after a few seconds, our eyes are able to adjust and see in the near-dark, thanks to a protein called rhodopsin found at the surface of certain specialized cells in the retina, the thin, vision-initiating tissue that lines the back of the eye.
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When cancers spread, or metastasize, from one part of the body to another, bone is a frequent and potentially devastating destination. Now, as you can see in this video, an NIH-funded research team has developed a new system that hopefully will provide us with a better understanding of what goes on when cancer cells invade bone. Learn more at the NIH Director's Blog:
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NIBIB-funded researchers generated stable lines of spinal cord neural stem cells in a laboratory dish. Once transplanted into a rat model of spinal cord injury, the cells enabled robust regeneration of functional neurons along the length of the spine. Learn more at NIBIB:
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