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NASA MAVEN Mission to Mars
Works at Mars' Upper Atmosphere
Attended University of Colorado - Boulder
Lives in an elliptical orbit around Mars (150 km x 6,200 km)
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Curiosity Rover Marks Three Years Since Touching Down in Gale Crater

It's a summer of milestones for ‪#‎Mars‬ exploration! Fifty years ago, Mariner 4 became the first spacecraft to take close-up pictures of Mars. Thirty-nine years ago, the Viking 1 Lander became the first spacecraft to successfully land on the Red Planet. And now, NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover celebrates three years on Mars—operating well over 1,000 Martian days.

Since its arrival in August 2012, Curiosity has driven nearly 11 kilometers from its landing site to the foot of Mount Sharp within Gale Crater.

For more information, visit: http://1.usa.gov/1IniL47

(Image credit: NASA/JPL)

+NASA  
+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
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Principal Investigator, Bruce Jakosky—"MAVEN Early Results"

In this presentation from June 20, 2015, Dr. Bruce Jakosky, principal investigator for the MAVEN mission and Professor of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder, opened the second day of the 2015 MAVEN New Media Professional Development Workshop with a presentation and discussion about some of the early results from the first mission devoted entirely to investigating Mars' upper atmosphere.

View all of the videos from the workshop in one playlist, here: http://bit.ly/NMPD_video

(Video credit: Tom Mason/University of Colorado - LASP)
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MRO Detects Impact Glass on the Surface of Mars

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has detected deposits of glass within impact craters on Mars. Though formed in the searing heat of a violent impact, such deposits might provide a delicate window into the possibility of past life on the Red Planet.

Read the full NASA release: http://1.usa.gov/1HXe2VX

(Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/JHUAPL/Univ. of Arizona)
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+Nick James 
Exactly!It is necessary to protect underground and that is not in the plans for future manned mission to Mars. I insist on using caves discovered on Mars, as a refuge. Use the caves saves a lot of money and astronauts will be safe.
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Fresh impact crater on Mars

This impact crater, captured by the HiRISE camera onboard NASA's #Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter appears to be a relatively recent one (on a geological time scale), as it has a sharp rim and well-preserved ejecta.

The steep inner slopes are carved by gullies and include possible recurring slope lineae (see: http://bit.ly/1Fux0md for details on RSL) on the equator-facing slopes. Fresh craters on ‪#‎Mars‬ often have steep, active slopes, so the HiRISE team is monitoring this crater for changes over time. The crater is a little more than 1-kilometer wide and contains diverse bedrock lithology,

To view the full image, visit: http://bit.ly/1FuwO6l

(Image credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona)

+NASA +NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory +The University of Arizona 
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MAVEN and UAE's Hope mission will provide very powerful combination of Mars science measurements

In an interview with +Forbes, ‪#‎MAVEN‬ principal investigator and Hope mission co-investigator, Bruce Jakosky, offered some insight into how the two missions will complement each other:

“The UAE Space Agency has been very consistent in that they don’t want to do a technology demonstration mission,” said Jakosky. “They want to contribute substantively to the world’s exploration and understanding of Mars.”

“The Hope science measurements will make a valuable contribution by themselves,” he added. “And if MAVEN is still operating when ‪#‎Hope‬ gets there, the combination will be very powerful.”

Read the full article, here: http://onforb.es/1K8dYZd

Image caption: Sarah Amiri, deputy project manager of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) Mars Mission, speaks during a ceremony to unveil the mission on May 6, 2015 in Dubai. The Hope mission aims to provide a global picture of the Martian atmosphere. 

(Image credit: KARIM SAHIB/AFP/Getty Images)
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MAVEN principal investigator, Bruce Jakosky, gave a public talk on April 22, 2015. Watch "Early results from the MAVEN mission to Mars" on our YouTube channel, now.
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Dave Brain—"MAVEN Measurements of Drivers, Response, and Escape

In this presentation from June 20, 2015, Dr. David Brain, assistant professor of Astrophysical & Planetary Sciences at the +University of Colorado Boulder and MAVEN science team co-investigator, focuses on atmospheric escape processes at Mars during the second day of the 2015 ‪#‎MAVEN‬ New Media Professional Development Workshop.

The presentation and related discussion covered some of the early results from the nine instruments onboard the MAVEN spacecraft and the model predictions of what the early data indicate about Mars' atmospheric and climate evolution.

View all of the videos from the workshop in one playlist, here: http://bit.ly/NMPD_video

(Video credit: Tom Mason/University of Colorado - LASP)
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MAVEN Results Find Mars Behaving Like a Rock Star

If planets had personalities, Mars would be a rock star according to recent preliminary results from the MAVEN spacecraft. ‪#‎Mars‬ sports a “Mohawk” of escaping atmospheric particles at its poles, “wears” a layer of metal particles high in its atmosphere, and lights up with aurora after being smacked by solar storms. MAVEN is also mapping out the escaping atmospheric particles. The early results are being discussed at a MAVEN-sponsored “new media” workshop held in Berkeley, California, on June 19-21. (‪#‎MAVENnm‬)

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/1BCY7zE
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Does it mean that the solar wind is booting efficiently what remains of the atmosphere of Mars?
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Mars Solar Conjunction

In June 2015, #Mars will swing almost directly behind the sun from Earth’s perspective, and this celestial geometry will lead to diminished communications with spacecraft at Mars.

The arrangement of the sun between Earth and Mars is called Mars solar conjunction. It occurs about every 26 months as the two planets travel in their sun-centered orbits. The sun disrupts radio communications between the planets during the conjunction period. To prevent spacecraft at Mars from receiving garbled commands that could be misinterpreted or even harmful, the operators of Mars orbiters and rovers temporarily stop sending any commands.

Read the full story: http://bit.ly/1JlYD7s.

(Video credit: NASA/JPL-CalTech)

+NASA +NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory +NASA Goddard 
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New study shows blue aurorae in Mars’ sky visible to the naked eye

For the first time, an international team of scientists from +NASA, the Institute of Planetology and Astrophysics of Grenoble (IPAG), the +European Space Agency, ESA and +Aalto University in Finland, have predicted that colorful, glowing aurorae can be seen by the naked eye on a terrestrial planet other than Earth—Mars.

Visible Martian aurorae seemed possible after the SPICAM imaging instrument on-board the ESA satellite Mars Express spotted aurorae from space in 2005. Those observations were confirmed in March 2015 by #MAVEN, which completed 1,000 orbits around the red planet on April 6, 2015.

Through laboratory experiments and a physical numerical model developed at NASA and IPAG, the study shows that, on ‪#‎Mars‬, aurorae also occur in the visible range. The most intense color is deep blue. As on Earth, green and red colors are also present. Several times during a solar cycle, after intense solar eruptions, these lights are bright enough to be seen with the naked eye.

Read the full story: http://1.usa.gov/1dAhezy

(Image credits: D. Bernard/IPAG—CNRS and NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS and CSW/DB)
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...stupendo...
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MAVEN Science Communication Workshop—June 19 - 21 in Berkeley, CA

Application deadline: May 11, 2015

Are you a science communicator (blogger, podcaster, social media practitioner) who wants to learn more about early ‪#‎MAVEN‬ results and the evolution of the ‪#‎Martian‬ climate? Then consider applying to attend the 2015 MAVEN New Media Practitioners Professional Development workshop at the University of California, Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory from June 19 - 21. There are just a few spots remaining, so apply today!

The 2015 workshop will offer a collaborative professional development opportunity for attendees to learn about current issues surrounding the evolution of the Martian climate, with an emphasis on the latest data and discoveries returned from the MAVEN spacecraft, as told through lectures and interaction with MAVEN scientists and experts.

Expenses for participant travel, lodging, and meals will be reimbursed.

For additional details and to apply, please visit: http://bit.ly/NMPD2015
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Traffic Around Mars Gets Busy

NASA has beefed up a process of traffic monitoring, communication and maneuver planning to ensure that ‪#‎Mars‬ orbiters do not approach each other too closely.

Last year’s addition of two new spacecraft orbiting Mars brought the census of active Mars orbiters to five, the most ever. MAVEN and ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission joined the 2003 Mars Express from the +European Space Agency, ESA and two from NASA: the 2001 Mars Odyssey and the 2006 Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The newly enhanced collision-avoidance process also tracks the approximate location of NASA’s Mars Global Surveyor, a 1997 orbiter that is no longer working.

It’s not just the total number that matters, but also the types of orbits missions use for achieving their science goals. ‪#‎MAVEN‬, which reached Mars on Sept. 21, 2014, studies the upper atmosphere. It flies an elongated orbit, sometimes farther from Mars than NASA’s other orbiters and sometimes closer to Mars, so it crosses altitudes occupied by those orbiters. For safety, NASA also monitors positions of ESA’s and India’s orbiters, which both fly elongated orbits.

Read the full feature, here: http://bit.ly/1KdgKZX

+NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
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Have them in circles
1,808 people
Kenneth Cummings's profile photo
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Work
Occupation
Mars upper atmosphere and ionosphere orbiter
Skills
Solving Mars' climate mystery. Where did the water and CO2 go?
Employment
  • Mars' Upper Atmosphere
    Orbiter, 2014 - present
    MAVEN is the first mission devoted to exploring Mars' upper atmosphere in an effort to help determine what happened to the once-dense atmosphere and surface water of the Red Planet and solve its climate mystery.
  • Cape Canaveral Air Force Station
    Spacecraft, 2014
    Atmospheric Orbiter
  • Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
    Spacecraft, 2012
    Detective
  • NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Space Systems, University of California at Berkeley, NASA - Jet Propulsion Laboratory
    Spacecraft, 2011
    Climate mystery investigator
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
an elliptical orbit around Mars (150 km x 6,200 km)
Previously
NASA's Kennedy Space Center - Waterton Canyon, CO
Story
Tagline
The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission is the first mission devoted to understanding the Martian upper atmosphere. The goal of MAVEN is to determine the role that loss of atmospheric gas to space played in changing the Martian climate through time. Where did the atmosphere – and the water – go?
Introduction
The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN Mission (MAVEN) launched on Nov. 18, 2013 and entered Mars orbit on Sept. 21, 2014 to begin exploring the planet’s upper atmosphere, ionosphere and interactions with the sun and solar wind.
Bragging rights
The second in NASA's Mars Scout missions, MAVEN will determine how much of the Martian atmosphere has been lost over time by measuring the current rate of escape to space and gathering enough information about the relevant processes to allow extrapolation backward in time.
Education
  • University of Colorado - Boulder
    Astronomy and Aeronomy, 2011
  • University of California, Berkeley
    Space Physics, 2011
Basic Information
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Birthday
November 18
Other names
Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN Mission