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NASA Goddard

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University of Wisconsin-La Crosse student Maddy Lambert is spending her summer working at NASA Goddard as an assistant optical engineer with WFIRST - a space telescope that will in part, study dark matter in the universe.

Every year, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. recruits hundreds of interns to spend the summer working on revolutionary missions featuring state-of-the-art technology. For more information on how you can be a NASA intern, go here: https://intern.nasa.gov
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Cassandra Altman's profile photoAlexander Reagan's profile photo
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Clean your reflection ball it was dirty
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Hubble's Slice of Sagittarius

This stunning image, captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), shows part of the sky in the constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer). The region is rendered in exquisite detail — deep red and bright blue stars are scattered across the frame, set against a background of thousands of more distant stars and galaxies. Two features are particularly striking: the colors of the stars, and the dramatic crosses that burst from the centers of the brightest bodies.

While some of the colors in this frame have been enhanced and tweaked during the process of creating the image from the observational data, different stars do indeed glow in different colors. Stars differ in color according to their surface temperature: very hot stars are blue or white, while cooler stars are redder. They may be cooler because they are smaller, or because they are very old and have entered the red giant phase, when an old star expands and cools dramatically as its core collapses.

The crosses are nothing to do with the stars themselves, and, because Hubble orbits above Earth’s atmosphere, nor are they due to any kind of atmospheric disturbance. They are actually known as diffraction spikes, and are caused by the structure of the telescope itself.

Like all big modern telescopes, Hubble uses mirrors to capture light and form images. Its secondary mirror is supported by struts, called telescope spiders, arranged in a cross formation, and they diffract the incoming light. Diffraction is the slight bending of light as it passes near the edge of an object. Every cross in this image is due to a single set of struts within Hubble itself! Whilst the spikes are technically an inaccuracy, many astrophotographers choose to emphasize and celebrate them as a beautiful feature of their images.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
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Slavoljub Krishan's profile photoRíša Surý's profile photoSimone Maria Marques's profile photo
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Lindas! 
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Magnetic arcs of solar material spewing from our favorite sphere of hot plasma, the sun.

Magnetic arcs of solar material held their shapes fairly well as they spiraled above two solar active regions over 18 hours on Jan. 11-12, 2017. The charged solar material, called plasma, traces out the magnetic field lines above the active regions when viewed in wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light, captured here by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. Extreme ultraviolet light is typically invisible to our eyes, but is colorized here in gold for easy viewing.

Credit: NASA/SDO 
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In the summer of 2016, a crew from VICE News interviewed Piers Sellers about his work at Goddard Space Flight Center and his career as a NASA scientist and astronaut. Sellers passed away on Dec. 23, 2016. This portion of the interview was broadcast on Jan. 6. https://news.vice.com/story/we-talked-to-nasa-scientist-piers-sellers-about-the-future-of-humanity-months-before-his-death
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Thank for this information ,It's very good for me
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NASA Goddard

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Extreme rain events have been affecting California and snow has blanketed the Pacific Northwest.

NASA/NOAA's GOES Project created a satellite animation showing the storms affecting the region from Jan. 6 through 9, 2017.

Today, another area of low pressure moved over Oregon, where the National Weather Service is forecasting heavy snows.

It was the same week last year that the West Coast endured a similar bout of very wet weather. Heavy rain affected the Pacific coast in 2016 during the same week from Jan. 5 through Jan. 7, as a progression of storm systems in the Eastern Pacific Ocean hit southern California and generated flooding and mudslides.
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Hubble detects "kamikaze" comets plunging into a young star, 95 light-years from Earth.

This illustration shows several comets speeding across a vast protoplanetary disk of gas and dust and heading straight for the youthful, central star. These "kamikaze" comets will eventually plunge into the star and vaporize. The comets are too small to photograph, but their gaseous spectral "fingerprints" on the star's light were detected by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. The gravitational influence of a suspected Jupiter-sized planet in the foreground may have catapulted the comets into the star. This star, called HD 172555, represents the third extrasolar system where astronomers have detected doomed, wayward comets. The star resides 95 light-years from Earth.

Read more: http://go.nasa.gov/2hZASqa

Credits: NASA, ESA, A. Feild and G. Bacon (STScI)

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Hjordis Torfa's profile photoMirko Vichi's profile photo
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Come già è in pratica scritto questa situazione potrebbe essere secondo la mia poca competenza la costruzione naturale di ogni stella dove parte delle nubi si buttano in un punto come queste comete formando in un tempo non ben definito la stella che poi ne verrà fuori !!
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Pineapple Express hoses California with Pacific moisture.

After more than four years of drought, Californians may wonder where the recent rain is coming from. Using satellites, NASA scientists have a unique view how Pacific rains get to the western United States.

This rain originates as water vapor in atmospheric rivers, shown here in white. Atmospheric rivers are narrow tendrils of moisture that occur all over the world. These particular atmospheric rivers known as the Pineapple Express transport water vapor from as far south as Hawaii to California. Land forces the moisture up into the atmosphere and cools it, producing significant rainfall and providing about 40 percent of the state’s annual water supply.

This visualization combines data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite and the Global Precipitation Monitor (GPM) mission. Together, they allow scientists to study the atmospheric rivers and the heavy precipitation they bring to California.


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Norman Kuring - Making the Unseen Ocean Visible

Goddard Oceanographer Norman Kuring studies nuances of ocean micro-organisms from space. He also designed the 2013 Blue Marble image that became a U.S. Stamp last year.

http://go.nasa.gov/2jub73J
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Earth sets record high temperatures for the third straight year

Earth’s 2016 surface temperatures were the warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880, according to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Globally-averaged temperatures in 2016 were 1.78 degrees Fahrenheit (0.99 degrees Celsius) warmer than the mid-20th century mean. This makes 2016 the third year in a row to set a new record for global average surface temperatures.

Read more: http://go.nasa.gov/2jz68k8
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Zafane Sofiane's profile photo
 
Wooow !!
Then what is the diagnosis mmm
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Hubble Gazes Into a Black Hole of Puzzling Light

The beautiful spiral galaxy visible in the center of the image is known as RX J1140.1+0307, a galaxy in the Virgo constellation imaged by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and it presents an interesting puzzle. At first glance, this galaxy appears to be a normal spiral galaxy, much like the Milky Way, but first appearances can be deceptive!

The Milky Way galaxy, like most large galaxies, has a supermassive black hole at its center, but some galaxies are centered on lighter, intermediate-mass black holes. RX J1140.1+0307 is such a galaxy — in fact, it is centered on one of the lowest black hole masses known in any luminous galactic core. What puzzles scientists about this particular galaxy is that the calculations don’t add up. With such a relatively low mass for the central black hole, models for the emission from the object cannot explain the observed spectrum. There must be other mechanisms at play in the interactions between the inner and outer parts of the accretion disk surrounding the black hole.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt
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Over a billion light-years away from us Hubble captured these two celestial objects, slowly, destructively, merge into one

This delicate smudge in deep space is far more turbulent than it first appears. Known as IRAS 14348-1447 — a name derived in part from that of its discoverer, the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS for short) — this celestial object is actually a combination of two gas-rich spiral galaxies. This doomed duo approached one another too closely in the past, gravity causing them to affect and tug at each other and slowly, destructively, merge into one. The image was taken by Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS).

IRAS 14348-1447 is located over a billion light-years away from us. It is one of the most gas-rich examples known of an ultraluminous infrared galaxy, a class of cosmic objects that shine characteristically — and incredibly — brightly in the infrared part of the spectrum. Almost 95% of the energy emitted by IRAS 14348-1447 is in the far-infrared!

The huge amount of molecular gas within IRAS 14348-1447 fuels its emission, and undergoes a number of dynamical processes as it interacts and moves around; these very same mechanisms are responsible for IRAS 14348-1447’s own whirling and ethereal appearance, creating prominent tails and wisps extending away from the main body of the galaxy.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
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Imre Karika's profile photoJOSHUA G WEBER's profile photojiberish001's profile photo
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Someone is indulging in elaborate sophistry.
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Here are a few of our top Instagram images from 2016. To see more great NASA Goddard images be sure to follow us on Instagram at www.instagram.com/nasagoddard and also on Twitter at https://twitter.com/NASAGoddardPix. 
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Richard Byrd's profile photoWilliam Cotterman's profile photoiloveteaalot's profile photo
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+Richard Byrd bitch please.
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NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Introduction
"It is difficult to say what is impossible, for the dream of yesterday is the hope of today and the reality of tomorrow." -- Dr. Robert Hutchings Goddard
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NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. www.nasa.gov/goddard
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