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NASA Goddard
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NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

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LIVE from the International Space Station! Maryland students will chat with astronauts Ricky Arnold, a Maryland native, and Drew Feustel tomorrow at 10:35 a.m. ET: http://go.nasa.gov/2qGOGgj

Speaking with Anne Arundel County Public Schools (AACPS)'s South River High School in Edgewater, Maryland, the 20-minute, Earth-to-space call will air live on http://go.nasa.gov/ntv. The Expedition 55 astronauts will answer questions about life aboard the space station, NASA’s deep space exploration plans and conducting science in space.

Linking students and teachers directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This in-flight education downlink is an integral component of NASA’s Year of Education on Station, which provides extensive space station-related resources and opportunities to students and educators. Astronauts living in space on the orbiting laboratory communicate with the Mission Control Center on Earth 24 hours a day through the Space Network's Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS).
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Where do we go from here?

As NASA astrophysicists like Aki Roberge propose groundbreaking NEW science missions, NASA technologists will need to invent new instruments to DO the science.

Read all about all the latest "CuttingEdge" NASA technology here: http://go.nasa.gov/2HwNZ2M
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Flown by the U.S. Air Force, the custom shipping container holding NASA's Parker #SolarProbe arrived in Florida on April 3 in advance of the mission’s launch to the Sun on July 31. https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2018/nasa-s-mission-to-touch-the-sun-arrives-in-the-sunshine-state

Parker Solar Probe is humanity’s first mission to the Sun. After launch, it will orbit directly through the solar atmosphere – the corona – closer to the surface than any human-made object has ever gone. While facing brutal heat and radiation, the mission will reveal fundamental science behind what drives the solar wind, the constant outpouring of material from the Sun that shapes planetary atmospheres and affects space weather near Earth.
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Hubble shows the spiral galaxy NGC 5714 about 130 million light-years away in the constellation of Boötes (the Herdsman). Its spiral arms are hard to see as NGC 5714 presents itself at an almost perfectly edge-on angle.

Discovered by William Herschel in 1787, NGC 5714 was host to a fascinating and rare event in 2003. A faint supernova appeared about 8,000 light-years below the central bulge of NGC 5714. Supernovae are the huge, violent explosions of dying stars. It was particularly interesting because its spectrum showed strong signatures of calcium.

Calcium-rich supernovae are rare and hence of great interest to astronomers. Astronomers still struggle to explain these particular explosions as their existence presents a challenge to both observation and theory. In particular, their appearance outside of galaxies, their lower luminosity compared to other supernovae, and their rapid evolution are still open questions for researchers.
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Move over Elsa. For the first time ever NASA scientists have created a 3-D model of a melting snowflake. How might this research improve predictions of hazardous heavy and wet snow? #LetItSnow

Read more: https://go.nasa.gov/2GGDHg6
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Our newest mission in the hunt for other worlds is getting ready for launch at Cape Canaveral. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will search the entire sky for potential planets orbiting nearby stars. Follow-up observations from other telescopes will tell us about the mass and density of these new worlds — and study their atmospheres!
http://go.nasa.gov/2GjzjR0
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In October, a mysterious object zipped through our solar system at 196,000 mph. Scientists named it ‘Oumuamua, which means “a messenger from afar arriving first” in Hawaiian, and it’s the first object we’ve ever seen that came from outside our solar system. Now our astrophysicists have helped calculate how it fits into what we know about how planetary systems form.

http://go.nasa.gov/2pH4W0s
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Take the bus to Mars today! Lockheed Martin's "Mars Group Virtual Reality Bus" is at the NASA Goddard Visitor Center today from noon to 4:00 p.m.! Learn about the science, technology, engineering and mathematics used in deep space exploration. http://go.nasa.gov/2HY0Nfq
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In the brilliant-blue nebula NGC 346, Hubble sees a sprinkling of infant stars still forming from gravitationally collapsing gas clouds. They have not yet ignited their hydrogen fuel to sustain nuclear fusion. The smallest of these is only half the mass of our Sun.
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