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NASA DEVELOP National Program
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NASA Earth Science Serving Society
NASA Earth Science Serving Society

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NASA DEVELOP National Program's posts

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Happy Pi Day! Circles are everywhere, including agricultural fields in Idaho. This image was captured by NASA Earth Observation Landsat 8 and then displayed using Google Earth Engine software. Why are the agricultural fields circles? These fields use a center pivot irrigation system, which is pretty much an industrial sprinkler that spins around to water crops. For semi-arid regions, such as southeastern Idaho, water management is important to sustain the agriculture industry while also conserving wildlife habitats. To learn more about Southeastern Idaho Water Resources project, click here.
Pi quiz: If a center pivot irrigation system is the radius of an agricultural field, how many systems do you need to cover the circumference of the field (assuming that the system can bend to match the curve of the circumference).
#NASADEVELOP #PiDay
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Tamara Dunbarr is a NASA DEVELOP Assistant Center Lead at the Arizona Node. Before DEVELOP, Dunbarr worked in IT for twenty years. As one of the only women in the office, Dunbarr took on many challenges and worked hard to gain respect in the workplace. Because if this, she was not afraid to take on a new challenge: going back to school. While pursuing her undergraduate degree at Arizona State University, working at NASA DEVELOP has helped her gain new career skills and foster her interest in science. “Prior to NASA DEVELOP, I spent a lot of time wanting to contribute positive things to the world, but not really being sure how I fit into the bigger picture,” explains Dunbarr. “By exposing me to research, management, networking, and geopolitics, I was able to definitively move forward with my career choices.” #NASADEVELOP #WomenInSTEM
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Happy @International Women's Day! In honor of International Women's Day, women scientists of NASA DEVELOP offered their visions to acheive gender equality in science and society. #WomenInSTEM #BeBoldForChange #NASADEVELOP

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NOx7Zs8dTOQ&t=1s

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NASA Chief Scientist, Dr. Ellen Stofan, is a strong supporter of women in the STEM fields. Her love of science stems all the way from planetary research of Venus and Mars to involvement in Arctic research. When interviewed by the American Geophysical Union about advice offered young professionals, Stofan said, “Of course the simplest advice is to find something that really excites you.” Quote comes from: http://blogs.agu.org/geospace/2016/03/15/geology-and-nasa-an-interview-with-dr-ellen-stofan-nasa-chief-scientist/ #NASADEVELOP #WomenInSTEM

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Meet project partner Dr. Cynthia Wallace, a research geographer with the US Geological Survey’s Southwest Geographic Science Team, Dr. Wallace worked with DEVELOP at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to use NASA satellite imagery to identify buffelgrass, an invasive species that increases the risk of forest fire in southern Arizona. She explains that current methods to remove buffelgrass in remote areas is aerial spraying of herbicides, but this method has a large risk of killing other native species. “Part of this project was to help optimize these treatments,” Dr. Wallace explains. Together, the team and Dr. Wallace tested different metrics to better understand the patterns of buffelgrass and how to monitor the plant. #NASADEVELOP
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugo53KBXZ4Y&t=6s

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Meet Project Partner Don Swann, a park ranger at a Saguaro National Park. Located in Southeastern Arizona, Saguaro National Park relies on snowmelt to provide freshwater to the park’s habitats. Swann mentions that each year there appears to be less snow, which means the park will need information about this trend in order to modify the water resources management. Swann is working with the NASA DEVELOP team in Mobile, Alabama to utilize NASA Earth observations to track snow melt over the past few years. “We're looking forward to see how imagery from space can be used to quantify changes in streamflow over the past few decades.” #NASADEVELOP
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As mentioned in Wednesday's post, the NASA DEVELOP team in Georgia worked with The Nature Conservancy in Atlanta to perform spatial analysis to find areas in the metro area that would benefit from urban forestry.
“This analysis resulted in the creation of prioritization maps that are informing decisions about land protection and reforestation,” explains Myriam Dormer, a DEVELOP partner that works for The Nature Conservancy.
In regards to working with DEVELOP on this project, Dormer mentions “Without a doubt, the highlight of this partnership was the high level of professionalism of the NASA DEVELOP leadership and team members.” #NASADEVELOP
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jj94X4-F-J0

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Currently, DEVELOP uses a lot of scientifically-advanced satellites and sensors to study the earth, but that has not always been the case. “…[I]n the 1970s time period, they didn’t have much in the way of orbital missions,” explains Dr. George Robert Carruther, one of the scientists that pioneered Earth-observing technology. His invention of the Far- Ultraviolet Camera/Spectograph allowed NASA to observe Earth’s upper atmosphere. The 50-pound gold-plated camera was launched on the Apollo 16 mission and placed on the moon. Thus, Dr. Carruther’s camera was the first moon-based observatory, not to mention it had a great view of planet Earth. #TBT #NASADEVELOP #BHM Photo credit: NASA
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The Nature Conservancy focuses on “advancing science and practice in the urban conservation field as we inform and guide decision-making at the grasstops and grassroots levels,” explains Myriam Dormer, Outreach and Urban Conservation Associate. The organization teamed up with DEVELOP team at the University of Georgia to utilize NASA Earth Observations to create prioritization maps that identify urban areas in Atlanta that would best benefit from having an urban forest. Friday's post will explain the outcome of these prioritization maps. #NASADEVELOP
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Meet our project partners at The Nature Conservancy in Atlanta, Georgia. Myriam Dormer, Outreach and Urban Conservation Associate, explains that “The [Nature] Conservancy aims to change the relationship between cities and nature” in order to create “a healthy, just and climate-resilient city.” For The Nature Conservancy in Atlanta, this means promoting the implementation of urban forests in order to improve water quality. In Wednesday's post we will learn why The Nature Conservancy reached out to NASA DEVELOP to help with their urban forest goal. #NASADEVELOP
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