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Murray Collier: Massage, Sports Therapy, Physio
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Sports injury clinic and sports massage clinic in the West End of Edinburgh.
Sports injury clinic and sports massage clinic in the West End of Edinburgh.

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In the fitness industry this time of year always means running season and for the injury prevention & rehabilitation side it's more of a "shin splint season."
Repetitive force from running cause cause various kinds of inflammation and pain in the lower leg. Pain in the shin region can often be misdiagnosed or assumed as traditional "shin splints" when it is in fact tendonitis (inflammation) of one or more muscles that run down the lower leg and cross the ankle.
According to the NHS you are at risk of shin splints if you:
• Have been running less than 5 years
• Run on hard surfaces and slopes
• Wear poorly fitted and non-supportive trainers 
• Are overweight (this puts extra stress down the shins)
• Have weak or tight ankle muscles
Here are some things to try: 
• Ice for 15 minutes and rest for 30 minutes, repeat cycle 2-5 times. 
• Stretch the calves frequently with a straight leg for 30 seconds each time and bent knee for 30 seconds each time (this is important as the deeper muscles can be part of, or the exact cause of your shin pain). 
• Get well-fitted footwear (running shops usually help you pick the best-suited trainers.
• Whilst rehabing your shin-splints or injury, keep fit by swimming, cycling or rowing which will dramatically reduce the forces through the lower leg, it sucks having to stop running but it's the best thing to do, giving your legs the time to heal.
Need further help?
• Get relief from shin splints and other sport-related issues with a Sports Therapy session. We offer massage, taping and stretching techniques to specifically reduce the symptoms. People often report dramatic improvements after just one session and following the specific advice they are given.
Book today and get 15 minutes added to your first session:

W. www.murraycolliermassage.com 
T. 07808197475 
E. murray@murraycolliermassage.com
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t's an increasingly common question going around and will continue to increase the more and more Sports Therapists that graduate from what is a relatively new type of manual therapy course. The most important thing I like to put across when asked is that it is never simply Sports Therapy or Physiotherapy, it's Sports Therapy and Physiotherapy - a team.

Most sports therapists are taught and instructed by experienced Physiotherapist lecturers who have actively specialize in sport so we share the same principles and manage injuries very similarly. In truth, Sports Therapy only exists due to the extensive amount of hard work and research achieved by Physiotherapy. The biggest difference between both is that Sports Therapists specialize in the field of sports injuries from day one of their studies. 


With a combination musculoskeletal therapy, sport science, sports medicine and biomechanics this makes a Sports Therapist slightly different from your every-day Physiotherapist. However there are many things that you might be referred to a Physiotherapist for such as neurological or heart conditions. Although named and marketed to attract active sports people, Sports Therapy is not just for the athlete. 


Here is a list of issues Sports Therapy can help you with:
Knee Injuries (Ligament Sprains, Meniscal teasr, osgood schlatters disease)
Piriformis syndrome (Sciatic pain from muscle compression)
Adhesive Capsulitis (frozen shoulder)
Weak, under-active muscles
Posture
Tennis & Golfers Elbow (medial and lateral epicondylitis)
Rotator Cuff Injuries (shoulder injuries)
IT Band Syndrome (Iliotibial band or runners knee)
Plantar Fasciitis (Foot surface pain)
Upper and Lower back pain (repetitive movements of the lumbar, thoracic and cervical spine)
Ankle sprains (lateral ankle sprains account for 10-15% of all sporting injuries)
Achilles tendon problems (tendonitis (inflammation) or tendinosis (degeneration)
Tension Headaches 
Rounded shoulders
Tension, pain and general problems in the lower limbs

With a combination musculoskeletal therapy, sport science, sports medicine and biomechanics this makes a Sports Therapist slightly different from your every-day Physiotherapist. However there are many things that you might be referred to a Physiotherapist for such as neurological or heart conditions. Everybody is different and suit different therapies and therapists, but so long as they have your best interest in mind you will be fine. 

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Murray Collier
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Is stretching before and after sports or activity enough to lengthen tight muscles? To answer this bluntly, no. If a muscle is 'tight' and we wish to unwind this troubled tissue from it's bad ways, we have to be strategic, consistent and absolutely periodic. 

If we really want to lengthen tighter muscles we should be holding our stretches for at least 30 seconds. And we should be repeating these stretches approx 4-8 times per day and if not more. Why? To lengthen tissue we need to stimulate our nervous system's proprioceptive counterparts (muscle, tendon and joint cells that tell our nervous system where we are in open space) to report new positive information regarding the muscle's new length and the joint it crosses's new range of motion. So for example, if you loosen of your quadriceps (front thigh muscles) - you can now bend your knee further and your hamstrings can contract closer to MAXIMAL.

Basically, we need high repetition to 're-educate' the tissue by 'bugging' the nervous system. You can get as technical as basic you like, it is what it is. We need to "bug our brains" to lengthen tight muscles. Fascinating. 
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A lot of people want to know what the difference is in visiting a Sports Therapist as opposed to a session which only contains massage when they have aches and pains.

The most important thing I like to get across when asked this question is that we constantly assess our clients in Sports Therapy. Massage and release techniques are incredibly effective in reducing tension, reducing pain and increasing mobility but the truth is, if someone is working deep into your body and creating physiological changes they should really have a strong reason behind every technique they use. If you're not assessing, you're guessing is a phrase I like to go by.

In Sports Therapy we speak to you, ask you to move and move you ourselves in order to figure out if muscles/tendons/ligaments are short, tight, damaged, healing, healed, normal, under-active, over-active and why this might be. We record this essential information regularly and put personal plans into place that include a range of massage techniques, stretches, strength exercises, mobilizations as well as regular support.

The beauty behind following this method is that it is in-line with good code of practice and ethics. We see clients frequently at first however by ensuring progress is made clients get better and do not require an expensive long-term plan when simply unnecessary, which is initially a common worry amongst many people I see to begin with.

I hope if you are thinking about seeking help with any ailments you might have, this article helps you.

Thanks for following! 
Murray Collier
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