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ProEx Physical Therapy
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45 followers
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Meme Monday: Try encouraging your kids into sports like tennis and swimming or try them as a family!

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BIRTHDAY SHOUT OUT to Chandra, our amazing Physical Therapy Aide! We hope you've been having a fun birthday weekend!! 馃帀馃帀
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We want you to know this...: We want you to know this... Here is our latest monthly video. http://bit.ly/2p63O72
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Booklets after surgery can help educate patients & reduce their fears: Many patients continue to have low back pain after surgery Low back pain is still one of the most common and expensive medical conditions in existence. The number of people affected by low back pain and the costs related to it is comparable to those for depression and cardiovascular disease. Some patients with low back pain also experience pain that radiates down to the leg, which is called sciatica. When these patients continue to experience pain after attempting various different types of non-surgical treatment, a type of surgery called lumbar discectomy many be recommended. This surgical procedure is generally effective for reducing leg pain, but many patients continue to experience low back pain after surgery. One reason for this lasting pain is that some patients have fears and beliefs that prevent them from moving about and staying active normally. In fact, these patients should be following a rehabilitation program and getting back into physical activities after some time, and this is found to be the best way for them to improve. This is why it's important to educate these patients after surgery and instruct them on how to get active. A booklet called "Your Back Operation" was therefore developed by a team of medical professionals to better educate these patients, and to evaluate how effective it is, a study was conducted. Two groups of patients given two different booklets Healthy patients who were scheduled to have lumbar discectomy for the first time were recruited for the study. All candidates were screened to determine if they could be included, and 102 patients were accepted and completed the entire study. These patients were evenly divided into either the control group or the intervention group. The control group received a booklet with general advice on how to recover from surgery, but it did not encourage positive beliefs or give any specific instructions on getting active and back to work. The intervention group was given the "Your Back Operation" booklet instead. This booklet encourages an active lifestyle after surgery and instructs patients to follow an early rehabilitation program led by a physical therapist to help them recover more quickly. It also tells them that returning to work earlier will lead to a faster recovery and better overall results. All patients were given questionnaires with questions about their pain, beliefs, and fears before surgery, immediately afterward and then again two months later. Both groups experience positive outcomes after reading booklets Two months after surgery, patients in both groups experienced positive outcomes from the surgery. Compared to their status before surgery, these patients reported less leg and low back pain, as well as less disability when getting around. The only major difference between the two groups was that the intervention group had fewer fears and negative beliefs about their condition after reading the "Your Back Operation" booklet. This shows that while both booklets were effective and well received by patients; the booklet that focused more on getting active was more effective for changing patients' beliefs. Since this is such an important part of the recovery process from surgery, these improved beliefs can make a big difference in helping patients improve more quickly. These booklets are also very inexpensive and can easily be distributed. From these findings, it seems that while any education may be helpful for patients after surgery, the "Your Back Operation" booklet can lead to a better overall mindset that will encourage them to get active and seek out rehabilitation from a physical therapist. -As reported in the January '16 issue of the Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

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Recipe Wednesday - Baja-Style Salmon Tacos: Yum! Click here for this tasty recipe!

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Hope your Easter weekend has been fun and relaxing! 馃悋馃悋
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Exercise & education reduces the risk for getting low back pain: It's important to figure out strategies to prevent this very common condition Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common health conditions throughout the world. It's estimated that about 12% of the global population currently has LBP to some degree, and this makes it an extremely expensive problem as well due to the costs of treating it and time lost from work. In addition, about half of the patients who get LBP once will experience another episode within one year of recovering from it the first time. This shows how important it is to figure out ways to prevent LBP before it starts. There have been many studies that have investigated this topic, but it's still not clear what the most effective strategies are for preventing LBP. Therefore, a very powerful review of literature called a systematic review was conducted on high-quality studies that looked into treatments to prevent LBP. This was followed by a meta-analysis, which took all the data found and analyzed it in detail to help determine which methods were actually best for the prevention of LBP. A search of medical literature leads to 21 studies used in the review Researchers who were conducting this systematic review and meta-analysis searched through four major medical databases to identify studies that were relevant to the topic. They were looking for high-quality studies called randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) - the most powerful type of individual study - that investigated different strategies to prevent LBP. This search led to 21 RCTs being accepted for this current study. The 21 RCTs contained data on 30,850 different patients and investigated six different strategies for preventing LBP: exercise, education, exercise and education, back belts, shoe insoles, and other prevention strategies. These studies were then reviewed and analyzed in detail with the goal of identifying which of these strategies was the best overall. Exercise alone is effective, but adding education may be even more helpful When education is added to exercise, it appears that the combination is even more likely to reduce the risk for LBP. Unfortunately, this was not found to be the case with education alone, and it seems that it needs to be combined with exercise to have a significant effect. In addition, back belts, shoe insoles, and ergonomic adjustments were not found to prevent an episode of LBP or sick leave due to LBP. On the whole, this study further supports the combination of exercise and education as a strategy to prevent LBP. This adds to a group of research on this topic that continues to show the importance of these two components in the prevention of LBP. Patients concerned with their risk for LBP should, therefore, speak to their physical therapist for education advice and guidance on the best forms of exercise that will help prevent LBP. -As reported in the February '16 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine

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Ready to run? If you're hoping to run in a marathon this spring/summer, here are a few tips: http://ow.ly/FY9B30aJe9h

#BostonMarathon #PhysicalTherapy #MullisPT #MoveWithoutPain

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Meme Monday: Pretty interesting, right?! Click here to see "9 Things You Should Know About Pain"
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