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We announce a dedicated section on openSUSE in Muktware.
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James Pakele's profile photoJoe Buckle's profile photoJos Poortvliet's profile photoJoe Fidler's profile photo
8 comments
 
Awesome news - it certainly deserves a dedicated section, looking forward to more articles on openSUSE.
 
What benefits does OpenSUSE have over Linux Mint... I'm seeing a lot of posts about OpenSUSE and it seems to be gaining more momentum by the day... So, I'm wondering, what are the main "selling" points of this distro?
 
I second the fact Suse deserves it's own corner! It is by far and wide my favourite desktop distro - I hope it stays that way. It replaced Ubuntu for me. Unfortunately, later released of Ubuntu stopped playing ball with my hardware :(
 
Quite a few things for me. But they are my own personal opinion.

1) Yast software management system is brilliant and it has an easy service list which you can enable/disable service on demand easily.
2) It detected and used my hardware where as Ubuntu never has done. Only problem I have is with wireless USB devices - but ndiswrapper sorted that.
3) Optimised for Gnome3
4) (and this might be just me) but I've found things to be a lot faster in OpenSUSE - I'm not sure if that had something to do with the fact that Ubuntu wasn't managing my hardware resources properly - but it seems to purr nicely - whatever I do, on this old tripe dev env I have (4 year old HP Pavillion). I'm running an Nginx webserver continuously - sharing files across a network and developing using Netbeans, usually lots of music or youtube videos going on as well - it never gets switched off either. Still purring :)

Overall just that it feels better and smoother - it's suited best to my needs. I've not tried installing a proper server using it though yet - nor shall I since we're using CentOS for that now (I love CentOS as well)
 
Nice to see openSUSE get some more attention ;-)
 
I switched from Ubuntu to OpenSUSE about a year ago for home and at work. For me I found fewer "deal-breaker" bugs, less dependence on upstream fixes (Ubuntu to Debian), and more focus on making it work, rather than making it pretty. I also like the Yast tools provided when I need to config the desktop.
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