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Media Psychology Research Center
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"Oculus Story Studio's new (& cute) animated short "Henry" brings the psychology of empathy (and much more) into the forefront of development and design. Yes, it will change the way the audience watches and thinks about movies, but it will only succeed as an artform if filmmakers, storytellers and producers understanding the fundamentals that create empathy, how empathy differs from sympathy and other forms of emotional response, how the sense of presence changes with perception and how people attribute meaning like intentionality in a 'shared space.' The most telling quote in the article is a parenthetical aside when Saschka Unseld is quoted as saying that the change in connection makes comedy twice as hard because Buster Keaton-esque physical comedy just feels “mean.” VR will force the examination of all the conventional filmmaking rules of thumb for transmitting engagement and emotion--without which the story isn't successful. #mediapsych More than ever, it's the psychology that matters.
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Ryan and Amy Green's video game "That Dragon, Cancer" gives new meaning to the term serious games. What transpired through the design and development, chronicling their journey with their young son's terminal cancer, shows the power of a narrative in game form to process tragedy and honor life by progressing through a story, experience emotional highs and lows and provide a safe environment--sort of an emotional halfway house--to get in touch with the frightening reality of losing a child. I can't imagine the pain and admire the Green's willingness to share their journey in a way others can experience it. 
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Ironically, the act of creating the 'texting while walking' lane forces student to consider how they use technology while walking in order to pick the right lane. The result: momentary tech mindfulness. Reverse psychology (aka good parenting).
One Utah university is giving students glued to their cellphones a place to call their own: a designated lane for texting while walking. The neon green lanes painted on the stairs to the gym at Utah Valley ...
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Smart marketing is about getting shares. Had a nice email from Tim Knowles that he had linked the article here with my blog post about the 2012 Obama campaign's use of social media--much more personal (not to mention effective)way of reaching out than letting a ping do the connecting for you.

Knowles' post also highlights a couple of important points which are easily forgotten in the plethora of social media tools and channels. First, it's not about the tools. You must find and really get to know your audience. The second is clearing the airspace so your message can be heard. This requires that you, in the tradition of the Ancient Greeks, also "know thyself"-or have developed your core brand story- because the customer-brand connection are psychologically interdependent.

Brands tell a lot of stories--and through the eyes of a narrative psychologist everything is fundamentally a story--but that is different from THE brand story, the core story that encapsulate the values and purpose of the brand. THE brand story should be the north star that guides all other stories you tell.

Getting your message heard is about the intersection of stories--the union of the audience's story with that of your brand. Most messaging is like a collision, like sheep butting heads. Noisy, unpleasant, and winning takes a long time. The intersection of stories is where meaning and experience are created in the mind of the consumer; where the relationship begins. When the brand and consumer stories fit, they become inseparable, part of the consumer's identity. Are you an Apple or PC person? A Coke or a Pepsi person? These stories work not just because of good brand stories, but because the brand stories intersected with consumer stories and created a shared story with larger meaning.
Selling with proof, case studies and real customer testimonials is an age old technique. Has this changed with the advent of social media or morphed into something different?
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The examples highlighted in this article--flipped classrooms, wearables, 'Internet of things' equipped classrooms--spark the imagination with their potential. I fear that the adoption rate will be, sadly, slower than the article projects given that we still have people debating the evils of social technologies and video games unable to lift their view high enough to see the learning concepts that frame the content. The good news is that some of the stalwarts of technophobia, such as the American Association of Pediatricians who published some of the more unreasonably restrictive guidelines for childhood screen time, are reevaluating their positions, and school districts are starting to think about introducing the long-needed "CyberCivics" into their curriculum. 
The NMC Horizon Report looks at the technologies that will shape the future of higher education over the next 1-5 years.
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Woe to the industries that sit back and think TV is the only place where mobile is the first screen. Scherer highlights the need for mobile, interactive and LIVE. The implications are far greater than just retooling the website.
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The roles of transparency and trust in a real time, big data world are much more important. Scherer's talking about TV's access to consumer data, but the ability to see and track ultimately cuts both ways. We will see politicians crash and burn if they continue to assume that keeping your head down and nondisclosure are viable strategies for misdeeds and missteps. Whatever the headaches of mobile and real time interactivity as disrupting technologies, I'm a huge fan of transparency and trust as meaningful social currency replacing 'who you know' and 'what you can get away with' in government and business. Ironically, this giant free-for-all we call the Internet may be the driver for a renewed society-wide focus on ethics and values. #mediapsych Ketchup may come out of the bottle all at once, but it will only disguise a bad hamburger for so long
France Télévisions’ director of future media Eric Scherer on the trends providing headaches and huge opportunities alike for television firms
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Have them in circles
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Technology continues to empower the individual. The "Quantifiable Self" technology is reaching beyond the physical to incorporate the psychological aspects of mood. That connection has tremendous power for behavior change and self-growth. You may have noticed that the self-help section of Barnes and Nobles is the largest in the store--and those are "just books". When usability and price intersect with function, self-help wearable technology will explode. Fitbit is already synonymous with fitness tracker (lucky Fitbit) and wearables haven't even touched the potential in revealing the mind-body connection. 
The next wave of wearables steers clear of fitness in favor of mental wellness.
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Brands have a story. Audiences have a story. Psychology is the link to make them fit and achieve optimal engagement across media platforms. Join us! Learn the psychology of branding with story, transmedia strategy and audience engagement through persona development. Dr. Jerri Lynn Hogg and I are presenting an overview of Fielding's new certificate program in Brand Psychology and Audience Engagement in a webinar July 1 at 4pm PT. Courses in the certificate include the two we designed 'Branding and Transmedia Storytelling' and 'Audience Profiling'. For more info mscadmission@fielding.edu or check out audiencepsych.com
Description: This information session provides an excellent opportunity to learn about program benefits and admission requirements. Faculty and admissions representatives will be available to answer questions. Please join this session with faculty members Pamela Rutledge, PhD and Jerri Lynn Hogg ...
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Key success factor not mentioned in all the brand leveraging opportunities: selfies feel personal, especially when they make eye contact and have context. Weibo, like Twitter and SnapChat, enhances the effect because it feels more authentic and immediate than other types of social media. 
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LEGO's transmedia approach did a great job of activating two profound assets: 1) a product that was itself essentially about nontraditional storytelling and 2) a highly psychologically-invested customer base who had linked their own stories with LEGO over a lifespan of play.
Recently, leading brand valuation and strategy consultancy Brand Finance nam
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New paper by Stephen White available on the Media Psychology Review online academic journal. Published by the Media Psychology Research Center, the journal was created to further cross-disciplinary and non-traditional examinations of the psychology of media and technology. In this article, White explores the potential for integrating positive psychology into the evaluation of media impact.

We welcome article submissions from practitioners as well as academicians. For more information, see http://mprcenter.org/review/submissions/
Stephen White, MA Abstract: Through film and documentaries, change makers, media, non-profits, and for-profits in the film issue space, are all using metrics and data to evaluate their impact. They want to be able to say that their movie raised awareness, corrected an unjust law, or changed people’s behavior. They are developing scientific methods to ...
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Everyone who has made a new friend, colleague or partner, met a new idea, found like-minded individuals, participated in a meaningful discussion, seen a picture of a long-distance relation, been inspired, or come across a new opportunity recognizes beyond a shadow of a doubt the potential for social expansion from peer-to-peer connectivity. Does the Internet have a downside? Sure. But as soon as we recognize the Internet as an extension of our social world and not some "other place," we will begin to focus more on 'cyber civics' and digital citizenship, and more effectively applying behavioral values and norms. People do seem, however, continually surprised that the full range of human behavior that exists offline should be manifest online. Only to more people. This is, in spite of our initial revulsion, a good thing as it raises our awareness to social problems that existing beyond our peripheral vision (or our particular set of blinders.) Cyberbullying, for example, has significantly increased awareness of bullying offline as well as on. Cell phone and elevator surveillance videos have changed our awareness of domestic violence from academic to visceral.

The landscape of the Internet helps us overcome some of the less productive social norms that offline behavior reenforces out of habit, negative stereotypes such as racial and gender bias. Evidence suggests that individual identity growth that occurs in the anonymity of online environments translates into positive offline behaviors. Can we continue to transfer the positive growth experiences on the Internet to break down previously entrenched social barriers offline? I like to think so. 
Overview of responsesBackgroundTechnology experts embrace the use of networked communications technologies and are naturally inclined to find them to be useful
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People
Have them in circles
23 people
Soleil Acu's profile photo
Shengli Hu's profile photo
International Innovation's profile photo
Diana Baca's profile photo
Emily - Geek Media Consulting's profile photo
Dr. Howard Drutman, PhD's profile photo
Atlanta Behavioral Consultants's profile photo
virendra kumar patel's profile photo
Timothy Musson's profile photo
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Understanding How People Use and Make Media
Introduction
The Media Psychology Research Center (MPRC) is a nonprofit dedicated to media research, assessment, development and education. 

We examine how people consume, produce and distribute information across all media technologies and seek to understand the impact on both individuals and society.  The mission of MPRC is to examine the interaction of media with human experience in every aspect of life for the purpose of promoting public understanding and positive media development and use.