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Mountainview Small Animal Hospital
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HOLIDAY CLOSURES FOR 2018 (Closed all day unless otherwise specified)

EASTER SUNDAY--4/1/18
MEMORIAL DAY-- 5/28/18
4TH OF JULY --7/4/18
LABOR DAY--9/3/18
THANKSGIVING--11/22/18
XMAS EVE--Closing at NOON
CHRISTMAS DAY--12/25/18
NEW YEARS EVE-- Closing at NOON
NEW YEARS DAY--1/1/19

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Rascal watching his favorite video, while I wait my turn to use the computer.

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Cheeto loves his toy

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We still miss our Pretty Penny. She was such a sweet kitty.
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Schedule an appointment with Dr Chante Tran and get to meet this wonderful doctor in person.  We are so happy to have her on our team!
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We are happy to announce Associate Veterinarian, Dr Chante Tran has joined the team at MVSAH!  We are certain you are going to love her as much as we do!
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DR T'S LATEST BLOG:

DR GOOGLE: WHY DO IT YOURSELF MEDICINE CAN BE HARMFUL TO PETS.
 
During patient exams, it often comes up that the owner has looked up something on the internet pertaining to their pet’s current condition. In most cases it goes no farther than just trying to figure out what the ailment is, but often, in other cases it leads to owners medicating with over the counter or prescription medication or attempting other forms of treatment at home.  This has happened in the past month enough that I felt I had to write a blog on this subject because inevitably, it is the pet who suffers the consequences. 
We understand that the internet has its place in medicine, but it should be one of information gathering, then consulting a professional with this information and discussing the questions it brings up. It should never be a replacement for proper, professional veterinary care for your pet.  If something happens to your pet, or you notice something different in behavior or in appearance, this is when you should make an appointment or at least call a veterinary office to find out what you should do.  For example, if your pet injures themselves and begins limping, please do not medicate with any human pain medication--even aspirin.  We realize that “Doggie Aspirin” is available over the counter in most pet stores, but it is no longer recommended for the treatment of pain in pets.  Currently, it might be used for the treatment of certain heart and blood disorders, but even then it must be used under the supervision of a veterinarian and even a specialist in certain circumstances.  In addition, other human pain medications like Aleve, Advil/Motrin, Tylenol/Acetaminophen or combination of the above are toxic to dogs and cats.  Depending on which medication a pet receives, they could suffer from stomach/gut ulcers to full kidney or liver failure and medical intervention may not be able to fix this once it goes as far as organ failure. If an owner gives their pet any of the above medications, the pet will need to have blood work and urinalysis to ensure no damage has occurred in addition to treating the initial reason for the exam.
If your pet gets into a fight with another animal (domestic or not) please seek immediate veterinary attention.  What might not look like much to you (whether you see blood or not, puncture wounds or tearing of the skin) is often more serious than you think.  Veterinarians call bite wounds or penetrating wounds the “tip of the iceberg” for a reason.  What happens during a bite wound is the tooth goes into the skin, often taking hair/dirt/bacteria beneath the skin. As the biting animal moves its head, the teeth separate muscle layers, blood vessels and other tissue below causing bleeding and open areas which leads to pocket formation.  Bacteria love this environment and will grow beneath the skin, and since this damage is rarely visible from the surface, most owners are not aware of what is occurring under those “few small holes”.  If this is not addressed, whether surgical or not, abscess formation most likely will occur. Depending on the severity of the tissue damage, scar tissue can form enclosing this infection leading to deterioration of the tissue called sloughing.  This can happen quickly depending on the bacteria level in the wound and will obviously lead to a much larger wound than the original.
The goal of surgery is to prevent this from happening in the first place by cleaning out the wound, cutting away any already compromised tissue, leaving only healthy tissue and installing drains to prevent pockets of infection from forming.  This is done in combination with appropriate antibiotic therapy geared towards these types of wounds.  If an owner tries to use another pet’s antibiotics, or buys something from a feed store and it’s the wrong antibiotic, or even if it’s the right antibiotic but given at the wrong dosage or frequency, infection will continue to grow, and can even become resistant to proper antibiotic therapy.   Some owners have tried to suture or butterfly tape the skin closed themselves leading to wounds that slough off large areas resulting in surgeries that end up being much more costly than they would have been if seen quickly.
 
 We have encountered this in the past few weeks more than I would have imagined, and in every situation, it was the pet who suffered.  The internet is not a veterinary school replacement--veterinarians undergo extensive training in the art of surgery to understand how to repair wounds to the skin and muscle tissue and perform proper drain placement.  Some wounds may heal without needing surgery, but it should be decided by a veterinarian and owner together whether or not to attempt that course of treatment--NOT tried out first at home and if not better, then seek out help.  This often leads to the scenario above of a much worse wound and a more demanding and costly course of treatment.
 
So please, do not use the internet as a “how to” when it comes to treating your pet. Help prevent your pet from suffering needlessly, seek professional veterinary advice if something happens or you have concerns. Never give a medication that has not been prescribed specifically for your pet unless your veterinarian directs you to do so.  Remember, we are only a phone call away, and can give you guidance on whether something needs to be seen immediately or not.
 
Thanks again for reading.  I felt that I needed to get this off my chest in a blog. You know where to find me if you have any questions.
 
--Dr Teresi

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