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Moshe Feder
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Moshe Feder

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At the World Fantasy Convention chatting with Ellen Datlow, Eileen Gunn, Garth Nix, and Gary K. Wolfe.

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I'm pleased to announce that I've acquired a novel and two sequels by David Levine. 

Visit David's website to learn more about them:
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Moshe Feder

commented on a video on YouTube.
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Excellent cosmic perspective! Deserves many more views than it's gotten.

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Not actually a plan for NYC imperialism. I'm pretty sure!
Imagining New York's street grid applied to the entire world
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Here we go again. Using scare tactics about child porn to attack our liberty. This sucks.
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Switzerland seems to be going this way as well.
Oh dear.
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Moshe Feder

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Gee, I wonder why a bunch of my friends are listed as "adding me back." Surely that many people can't have uncircled me back accident. Was it just that I wasn't doing much here?
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Aha! Thanks for explaining. I guess Google needs better editors. I would have made this "added you in return."
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Wish I'd been there. Thanks for capturing and sharing this!

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Thanks for the tip. I've found it's playing in Cambridge tonight and tomorrow - may try to make it. 
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How nice to see this sensible discussion of AH in the New Yorker of all places.
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The Israeli Foreign Ministry Goes to YouTube and I Respond Here


Shocked and saddened by the horror in Norway? Sick and tired of the debt-limit morass in Washington? Allow me to distract you with some opinions about another of the world's well-worn trouble spots.

Israel's Ministry of Foreign Affairs has posted a nice educational/PR/propaganda -- your choice -- video on YouTube. It's just a six minutes long, done in a light style, and well worth watching for the educational value of the too-little known facts it presents.

You'll find it here: http://youtu.be/XGYxLWUKwWo

However, my posting it here does NOT mean I endorse everything it says. As I'll explain below, much as I like it, I think it's flawed, and I have some serious problems with the underlying attitude it stems from.

While it's generally very informative and convincing, I do think there are a couple of weak points in its argument.

The first is its appeal for justification to the unilateral decision of the British Empire in 1917. Imperialism doesn't have much legitimacy these days.

The second is the further basis of its argument in that British decision's later affirmation by the League of Nations. The League is a long-defunct body only history buffs remember, that no one much respected even when it was still around.

It's hard to see anyone, even someone neutral toward Israel, let alone someone hostile to it, being very impressed by those two points.

But let's grant the argument that these historical facts give Israel legal justification for its current activities beyond the green line, and therefore for its negotiating position. Even so, this film still suffers from the failing I see, and am exasperated by, in both parties to the conflict.

That failing is what I call wishfulness.

The Arabs don't want to deal with the reality of a long-established, successful Jewish state with a deep-rooted history in the region that predates their own arrival. Instead, they've actively tried to drive us out, and when they're not doing that, they negotiate, or pretend to, as if they could unwrite our long history and wish us away. But we're not going to disappear.

The Jews don't want to deal with the reality that in the process of restoring the Jewish state they displaced thousands of people who were not themselves guilty of usurping us, and radically disrupted their lives.

They don't want to deal with the fact that those people (and, increasingly, their descendants) aren't going to stop being angry about that because Israel waves a piece of paper from 1917, nor if a deal is made that doesn't have some semblance of justice. Instead, we Jews just wish those troublesome people would please emigrate elsewhere. But that's not going to happen, and they're not going to disappear.

The Jews also don't want to deal with the fact that they are eventually going to be outnumbered in their own country, making the perpetuation of Israel as a democracy and a Jewish state impossible. Instead, they wish the Arab citizens of Israel, the descendants of those people who chose not to run away from the Jews in 1948, would just stop having kids or somehow just politely leave. But that's not going to happen, and they're not going to disappear either.

In other words, both sides base their actions on wish fulfillment fantasy rather than practical facts and actual people in the real world.

Until those facts are acknowledged, until each side admits that the other side is just as stubborn and determined as they are, and that they are not going to just conveniently disappear, the middle east mess will continue. All the clever PR the Ministry of Foreign Affairs cares to post to YouTube isn't going to change that.

It's recently occurred to me that the story of Israel and its neighbors can be summed up by the two most famous quotations attributed to the revered sage, Hillel.

After the horrors of the Shoa, we Jews justifiably told ourselves "If I am not for myself, who will be for me? And when I am for myself, what am I? And if not now, when?" On that basis, we took back our homeland, restored Jewish sovereignty for the first time in 2,000 years, and created a modern, prosperous, enlightened state we have a right to be proud of.

But six decades later, basking in our success, I think it's time to recall that Hillel also said, "That which is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow. That is the whole Torah; the rest is the explanation; go and learn.''

No reasonable person can deny that we've treated the people (I'm talking about the individuals here, not their rulers) in the territories and Gaza in a way we'd find hateful if it were done to us. Yes, some of that was done for reasons of national survival and to save Jewish lives, but there comes a point to recognize that if circumstances repeatedly force you to behave hatefully, it's time to make a deeper change, so you can behave like a mensch instead.

That's why I think Jewish history obligates us to preserve, protect, and defend Israel, and also why I think Jewish values (and, ironically, hard-nosed realism too) obligate us to do so in the most humane and generous way.
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People
In his circles
289 people
Have him in circles
433 people
Avram Grumer's profile photo
Henrics Mayores's profile photo
Lis Carey's profile photo
KATLEYA LYANMY LUCKANONA LISBOA's profile photo
CHECK STAND PROGRAM's profile photo
Kathleen Morrison's profile photo
Khali Shaheed's profile photo
Laramie Sasseville's profile photo
Aric Haley's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Editor
Employment
  • self-employed
    Consulting Senior Editor, 2004 - present
  • Tor Books
    Associate Editor, 2000 - 2004
  • Doubleday Book Clubs
    Editor-in-Chief, Military Book Club, 1989 - 1995
  • Doubleday Book Clubs
    Assistant Editor SF Book Club, 1984 - 1989
Story
Tagline
An aspiring renaissance man and time-traveller in training. He's also been accused of being an alien spy.
Introduction
Moshe Feder began reading SF and Fantasy in the late 1950s and became an active fan in 1970. In 1972, while still in college, he joined the staff of the science fiction and fantasy magazines Amazing and Fantastic as Assistant Editor.

He's been a reviewer for Publishers Weekly and Asimov's, Assistant Editor of the SF Book Club (and Editor of the Military Book Club), and a judge for the World Fantasy and Sidewise awards. His only published fiction appeared in Damon Knight's Orbit 16. 

Moshe is a Consulting Senior Editor for Tor Books where he's been fortunate enough to acquire and edit some New York Times bestsellers. He recently learned he is related to Rabbi Judah Loew, creator of the Golem.
Bragging rights
2011 Hugo Award nominee for Best Editor, long form. Proud and humble 2015 winner of the E. E. Smith Memorial Award ("the Skylark") given by NESFA for lifetime contributions to SF and fandom.
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