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Morio Murase
Worked at OSP2
Attended UC Irvine Extension
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Morio Murase

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Protip: Never assign menial punishment to a programmer.

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I used to like writing out the first line and then using dittos for every subsequent line.

Morio Murase

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Since +Fen got me started on the Boatswain chocolate stout at Trader Joe's, I wanted to try out some of their other brews.

This one's the HLV ("Heavy Lift Vessel") ale. Not sure what HLVs do, I'm a landlubber, but this is like an India pale ale, except a darker brown. Lots of IPAs from craft breweries in California for some reason. Not a huge fan of IPAs or heavily-hopped beers in general, because they can (and often do) overpower the rest of the brew's aroma and flavor. This one, however, went down pretty smooth.

There was a hint of sweetness from the malts behind the strong hoppy foreground, but I couldn't detect any of the "toasted" aromas/flavors from the malt or much acidity from fermentation because my palate was just saying "Yep, hops. Definitely hops.". The label says "balanced", I'd say, "ehh.... almost balanced; at least they didn't chuck every last known hops variety into the batch Because They Can (tm)."

If you want something with a bit more punch than a typical brew for just north of 2 bucks, this is a pretty good beer. Me, I'll stick with the stout until I can find a decently-priced amber or red ale.

Brita pitcher not included.
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Ha! Glad to have been of service. I tend to feel the same way about IPAs and avoid them for the most part for that reason. I will give this HLV a shot.

Morio Murase

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Re: Code (and other tech) snobbery.

I do make fun of some programming languages, but only in jest (JavaScript and PHP mainly). But yes, there are a lot of people who are paid to create and support systems written in these languages, and more power to them-- they're doing thankless and valuable jobs.

And it's not limited to tech programming, of course-- try saying the phrase "pocket screws" in a woodworking forum and watch them turn and burn. Often times this sort of thing happens when an "easy" technology emerges to the chagrin of practitioners of older methods, or when influential/charismatic people preach that there is only One Right Way (R) to do stuff when seasoned veterans know that this is hardly the case.

Via +Lauren Weinstein 
 
A worthwhile read.
Other languages sucked, the people using them were losers or stupid, if they would just use a real language, such as the one we used, everything...
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Blockered at work, will try to circle back later and read.

Morio Murase

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Okay, I know couples in churches who would have the baby and shower him/her with love even if the baby only lives a week.

But here's the thing: They decided to do so. Maybe their pastor talked them into it (and that's probably not something a pastor should be doing), but still, it was their decision.

What Congressional Republicans would like to do is eliminate that choice, because powerful churches want to see that choice destroyed.

Dominionism is why we can't have nice things.
 
Really ugly examples of misogyny.
Republicans in Congress say that microcephaly isn’t all that bad, and women in South and Central America who contract the mosquito-transmitted Zika vir ...
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+Fen Clanging cymbals, man, as St. Paul would say...

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I just had a guy in Armored Warfare tell me "Get the f*** out of the town, you're not a tank destroyer" just because I was doing long-range shots into the cap circle (and I was getting good damage/kills, which almost never happens because I'm usually a horrible shot-- I found a pretty decent sniping spot with a good view of the capture point-- hey, if the AIs are going to roll right in front of my gun, might as well, right?). At least that jerk didn't kill me for doing so, but I still reported him. It was understandable as I was driving a MBT like I normally do, but jeez, chillax people.

Just goes to show that there's always some idiot who wants the rest of his team to do what he wants even if it's physically impossible.
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"It was never designed to do this, it feels like a monkey patch, but if it's stupid and it works..."

Via +Lars Fosdal 
 
That moment when all your hours of coding pay off. On to the next project. http://msft.it/6265BwxMz
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Morio Murase

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"'You'll be fine,' he said... 'I'll reel you in,' he said..."

Anime: KonoSuba
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I can't be the only one who mistook her for asuna at first glance... Right?
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This line of thought isn't limited to Facebook, but is pervasive throughout Silicon Valley. Its all about the subtle hidden message of "bringing enlightenment to savages". 

In this particular case, its also a monopolistic practice. It gives them an unfair advantage in the market place. And as the data shows, it isn't really benefiting who they say it does. 

If you really want to bring technology to people who have need of it, you can't take their dignity, privacy, and personal freedoms in exchange. 
Today’s empires are born on the web, and exert tremendous power in the material world.
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You know you've watched too many DIY videos when you find yourself examining a wooden table and thinking, "Yep, pocket screws in the apron... OMG, they glued/pocket screwed the wooden top? What are they thinking?"
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Does Google Hate Old People?

http://lauren.vortex.com/archive/001152.html

No. Google doesn't hate old people. I know Google well enough to be pretty damned sure about that.

Is Google "indifferent" to old people? Does Google simply not appreciate, or somehow devalue, the needs of older users?

Those are much tougher calls.

I've written a lot in the past about accessibility and user interfaces. And today I'm feeling pretty frustrated about these topics. So if some sort of noxious green fluid starts to bubble out from your screen, I apologize in advance.

What is old, anyway? Or we can use the currently more popular term "elderly" if you prefer -- six of one and half a dozen of another, really.

There are a bunch of references to "not wanting to get old" in the lyrics of famous rock stars who are now themselves of rather advanced ages. And we hear all the time that "50 is the new 30" or "70 is the new 50" or ... whatever.

The bottom line is that we either age or die.

And the popular view of "elderly" people sitting around staring at the walls -- and so rather easily ignored -- is increasingly a false one. More and more we find active users of computers and Internet services well into their 80s and 90s. In email and social media, many of them are clearly far more intelligent and coherent than large swaths of users a third their age.

That's not to say these older users don't have issues to deal with that younger persons don't. Vision and motor skill problems are common. So is the specter of memory loss (that actually begins by the time we reach age 20, then increases from that point onward for most of us).

Yet an irony is that computers and Internet services can serve as aids in all these areas. I've written in the past of mobile phones being saviors as we age, for example by providing an instantly available form of extended memory.

But we also are forced to acknowledge that most Internet services still only serve older persons' needs seemingly begrudgingly, failing to fully comprehend how changing demographics are pushing an ever larger proportion of their total users into that category -- both here in the U.S. and in many other countries.

So it's painful to see Google dropping the ball in some of these areas (and to be clear, while I have the most experience with the Google aspects of these problems, these are actually industry-wide issues, by no means restricted to Google).

This is difficult to put succinctly. Over time these concerns have intertwined and combined in ways increasingly cumbersome to tease apart with precision. But if you've every tried to provide computer/Internet technical support to an older friend or relative, you'll probably recognize this picture pretty quickly.

I'm no spring chicken myself. But I remotely provide tech support to a number of persons significantly older -- some in their 80s, and more than one well into their 90s.

And while I bitch about poor font contrast and wasted screen real estate, the technical problems of those older users are typically of a far more complex nature.

They have even more trouble with those fonts. They have motor skill issues making the use of common user interfaces difficult or in some cases impossible. Desktop interfaces that seem to be an afterthought of popular "mobile first" interface designs can be especially cumbersome for them. They can forget their passwords and be unable to follow recovery procedures successfully, often creating enormous frustration and even more complications when they try to solve the problems by themselves. The level of technical lingo thrown at them in many such instances -- that services seem to assume everyone just knows -- only frustrates them more. And so on.

But access to the Net is absolutely crucial for so many of these older users. It's not just accessing financial and utility sites that pretty much everyone now depends upon, it's staying active and in touch with friends and relatives and others, especially if they're not physically nearby and their own mobility is limited.

Keeping that connectivity going for these users can involve a number of compromises that we can all agree are not keeping with ideal or "pure" security practices, but are realistic necessities in some cases nonetheless.

So it's often a fact of life that elderly users will use their "trusted support" person as the custodian of their recovery and two-factor addresses, and of their primary login credentials as well.

And to those readers who scream, "No! You must never, ever share your login credentials with anyone!" -- I wish you luck supporting a 93-year-old user across the country without those credentials. Perhaps you're a god with such skills. I'm not.

Because I've written about this kind of stuff so frequently, you may by now be suspecting that a particular incident has fired me off today.

You'd be correct. I've been arguing publicly with a Google program manager and some others on a Chrome bug thread, regarding the lack of persistent connection capability for Chromebooks and Chromeboxes in the otherwise excellent Chrome Remote Desktop system -- a feature that the Windows version of CRD has long possessed.

Painfully, from my perspective the conversation has rapidly degenerated into my arguing against the notion that "it's better to flush some users down the toilet than violate principles of security purity."

I prefer to assume that the arrogance suggested by the "security purity" view is one based on ignorance and lack of experience with users in need, rather than any inherent hatred of the elderly.

In fact, getting back to the title of this posting, I'm sure hatred isn't in play.

But of course whether it's hatred or ignorance -- or something else entirely -- doesn't help these users.

The Chrome OS situation is particularly ironic for me, since these are older users whom I specifically urged to move to Chrome when their Windows systems were failing, while assuring them that Chrome would be a more convenient and stable experience for them.

Unfortunately, these apparently intentional limitations in the Chrome version of CRD -- vis-a-vis the Windows version -- have been a source of unending frustration for these users, as they often struggle to find, enable, and execute the Chrome version manually every time they need help from me, and then are understandably upset that they have to sit there and refresh the connection manually every 10 minutes to keep it going. They keep asking me why I told them to leave Windows and why I can't fix these access problems that are so confusing to them. It's personally embarrassing to me.

Here's arguably the saddest part of all. If I were the average user who didn't have a clue of how Google's internal culture works and of what great people Googlers are, it would be easy to just mumble something like, "What do you expect? All those big companies are the same, they just don't care."

But that isn't the Google I know, and so it's even more frustrating to me to see these unnecessary problems continuing to persist and fester in the Google ecosystem, when I know for a certainty that Google has the capability and resources to do so much better in these areas.

And that's the truth.

-- Lauren --
I have consulted to Google, but I am not currently doing so -- my opinions expressed here are mine alone.

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Morio Murase

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I think the very last photo of him before he went to Ford's Theater had a crack in the glass plate, right across the top.
 
President Abraham Lincoln, photographed a week before his final (56th) birthday, this week 1865: #Gardner pic.twitter.com/EvF5mSVkWt
@BeschlossDC Amazing to see the wear and tear of the war on his face....both captivating and sad. Syncopated Politics · 9m9 minutes ago. Syncopated Politics @SyncPol. @BeschlossDC Astounding how the Presidency ages someone. This was a very physically fit man.
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And right after the code freeze...
 
That particular moment when you realize you're able to develop a AAA game, but you use an extra "P" that ruins all your efforts.
:-)
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25 communities
Work
Occupation
Recovering IT support tech, aspiring Android/iOS developer.
Skills
IT support (OS, databases, network), Bilingual Japanese/English (spoken and written), basic web development (HTML/CSS), Ruby, Java, shell scripting, FreeBSD, Linux, Samba
Employment
  • OSP2
    ERP Support Engineer, 2007 - 2012
    Responsibilities: Enterprise technical support for Japanese datacenter technicians. Identify and triage messages for multiple clients and systems. Troubleshoot problems in areas including but not limited to: applications, database, OS, network, backups, hardware. Provide stopgap and final solutions for client problems. Access vendor support for solutions. Write up detailed explanation of problem and solution with different reporting formats for each client. Translate latest technical documents to Japanese. Achievements: - Built and set up FreeBSD file/print server (Samba) and DNS cache. - Built and set up Windows 2008 Server for Sharepoint 2010, including SQL Server 2008 R2 and Active Directory. - Set up a wireless security camera system using consumer-grade products (web cameras, FTP server). - Acquired ISO 27001 certification (Information Security Management System). Trained new hires as systems administrator and managed the technical aspects of the ISMS. - Advised CEO on product purchases.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Single
Other names
magus_melchior, Steam: Earl of Sandvich, World of Warships: Chief_PO_M, Diablo III: Zirconius#1393
Story
Tagline
I'm sorry, did I blow your mind?
Introduction
I'm a Japanese-American Christian IT guy who (now on rare occasion) plays the violin. That should cover the majority of people who actually know me or know who I am.

For those who are familiar with Myers-Briggs personality types, one online survey scored me as INFP.

Other interests include progressive politics and video games. I do translation work on occasion, but my off-the-clock productivity is about the same as Piro from MegaTokyo-- as in, busy with other stuff to the point where productivity hurts.

日本からの皆さんもお気軽にサークルしてください。(日本語が下手でお恥ずかしいですが…。)


My commenting/posting policy:
  • Keep it respectful, keep it cool: I reserve the right to uncircle or block people for most Bad reasons-- generally, being nasty to me personally or to friends of mine. I don't block often, as the G+ community tends to be respectful. Obvious TOS violations (spamming and the like) will be reported. Be warned that while I respect conviction of worldview or belief, I don't respect people who expect everyone to agree with them!
  • No crazy stuff: I have little patience for conspiracy theories or anything that's similar. I do try to keep an open mind (and often fail), but it's been said that "arguing with a conspiracy theorist is like wrestling with a pig-- after a while both of you are dirty and the theorist is enjoying it!" What's a conspiracy theory? Anything that tries to present an "alternative viewpoint" despite all the evidence to the contrary. Apollo mission hoax, that sort of thing. (I might refine that definition, but it'll do for now)
  • This isn't Twitter or Facebook. There is no need to post an empty follow-up that revises your earlier comment or post-- just edit the post. If you're revising an argument in debate, use strikethrough (minus before and after). Flooding someone's notifications is an indication that you're more impatient than accurate; take your time and organize your thoughts. If the discussion gets away from you, start a post and follow up! Also, engage with your friends! Talk to them! Share something you found funny and yuck it up! If you've got a smartphone or laptop with a camera, go join a Hangout! (Note to self: explore hangouts) If you expect G+ to automatically make you visible to your new friends, I'm afraid you'll find this as exciting as the journalists who expected people to drop everything and talk to them and declared G+ a "ghost town".
  • TODO: add policies as I remember them... or make them up.
Bragging rights
Umm... played video games since the Atari 2600?
Education
  • UC Irvine Extension
    Mobile Application Development, 2013 - 2013
Links
Other profiles
Contributor to
I've had horrible experiences with the online and phone ordering systems-- the orders would be cancelled with or without notice and without even a proper attempt to charge my credit card, without a suitably reasonable explanation. The visit to this store the other day would represent my fifth attempt to order service from T-Mobile, after 4 aborted attempts online and over the phone, and the difference is like night and day. The staff here was very helpful and courteous, clearly explaining what they had to offer and how much it would cost. Additionally, they were very patient with my mom and me-- we are very finicky shoppers-- and after an hour or so we had a 2-line family plan and 2 smartphones. So the answer to frustration online or over the phone is to go to this T-Mobile shop! If you have a few dollars to spare, buy a few accessories, because you can get a reasonable deal here (if you can't afford it, shop around on Amazon). I'm going from a grandfathered Verizon plan to 2 lines at the same price, plus a chunk of change more for a couple of new smartphones. After 2 years, I'll probably have a far better deal than I ever had with Big Red.
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Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Took in a neglected pickup for repair; within 3 hours Anthony and Khang identified the problem, and 2 hours later it was fixed and ready to go. I knew it was going to be a costly repair when he said "fuel pump" because the pump is inside the gas tank, but the repair cost was very reasonable. They even showed us what happened to our fuel pump after 10 months of neglect. Courteous, fast, affordable service. Definitely one of the best in the area.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
"Cafe" is an odd pick for a name, as this is much more like a fish and chip shop with some upscale additions to the menu. They have the local Granville Island Ale/Lager on tap, no doubt from the brewery right across the street-- the ale was well-balanced: not too hoppy, not too malty, and a great complement to the fish and chips. If you get anything here, get the seafood platter, which is a little of everything plus some garlic butter sauce. I don't know if the chef went to the nearby culinary school, but if she did, it certainly shows. The food was fantastic: perfectly seasoned, neither over- nor under-done. It is a bit cramped, having 6 or 7 small tables plus a bar in a space where I would use 4 tables, but the food and excellent service are well worth it.
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Food: ExcellentDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
I'm a huge fan of snack-type bread,and 85c has some of the best selections this side of the Pacific-- including the Japanese bakeries. The savory bread is satisfyingly chewy and soft, and pastries are flaky and light-- sorry, no rustic loaves here to my knowledge. I have yet to find a roll or pastry I don't like here, and the service is quite good-- during the evening rush they will pre-wrap your selection to speed you on your way. My one complaint is with the location; the parking often gets crowded to a frightening degree, and even with the crowd controlled within fire safety code limits you cannot hear yourself think during rush hours. Nevertheless, that should give you a very good idea of the quality of food served here. Think Seinfeld's Soup Nazi without the Nazi. Next time I will try the coffee and amazing-looking cake. Yum.
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Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago
6 reviews
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Orenchi is the sister shop to a _yakitori_ place down in SoCal (Los Angeles, I think; I'll have to look them up). The Japanese _kodawari_ (obsession) spirit is strong here, because there is a limited amount of soup that can be served, and when that's gone, the restaurant closes. My friend and I ordered the "special" ramen, and I have to say that Google+ needs some more ranks in the "food" rating because this is easily a 5+. The soup is intensely flavored, rich in gelatin, yet perfectly balanced-- they said they spent hours prepping the stuff, and they are most certainly not joking. I was very sorry I had a burrito earlier that day. The staff are very friendly despite heavily accented English, but I bet all of them are from Japan, because the servers both worked quickly and made sure that every need was met (yes, you will wait for the ramen-- it looks like the chef handles all the noodle orders). That, and they responded exactly as how a ramen shop would in Tokyo. Owing to the quality of the food, the place will be packed and _loud,_ guaranteed, from the second the place opens. Your best bet is to skip lunch and wait outside until they open. I'm surprised they're getting some low marks for decor, but I felt like I was in an old-school Japanese restaurant complete with the wood plank and _sumi_ ink menu. Okay, the place doesn't exactly lend itself to conversation, and the tables/chairs might be a bit wobbly, but the food has a way of rendering that irrelevant.
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Food: ExcellentDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
A colleague tried the miso, and I tried the _yatai_ special. Tasty soup, chewy noodles, and all the toppings you would expect from a ramen shop in Japan. The atmosphere was a bit dark, but I bet this would be a nice cozy spot for a date because the tables are candlelit. The servers are very friendly and accommodating; one knows fluent Japanese, which is definitely a plus (my colleague is originally from Japan).
Food: ExcellentDecor: Very GoodService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago