Profile

Cover photo
Mohan K.V
634 followers|840,559 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosYouTube+1'sReviews

Stream

Mohan K.V

Shared publicly  - 
 
+Arvind Iyer shared this in a thread elsewhere. It is a good read (thanks A), but it also contains some spectacularly wrong over-generalizations. Some comments:

On causal nexuses, 'the cartoon of single causes', denying 'free will' and moral responsibility : for a flippant (but still insightful) rebuttal, see: http://www.smbc-comics.com/?id=1994 ; for another common misapplication of this idea, see: https://plus.google.com/+MohanKV/posts/MYAN9STwunp

It is one thing to say that things are more complex than they seem, and that one should always be watchful of factors one has missed. It is something entirely another to talk of impossible-to-comprehend 'causal nexuses' and denying the concept of a 'root cause'.

If one does take the superior reading, we have made tremendous progress in the area. Something I deal with every day: root cause analysis: http://www.thwink.org/sustain/glossary/RootCause.htm

For some good exposition on how intention is ascribed in crime: http://lawcomic.net/guide/?p=173 and several pages following -- strongly recommend the book as well, Burney is exceptional.

On 'misattribution arbitrage', all he's really saying 'don't be fooled by randomness'. Others like Taleb have made the argument elsewhere very convincingly. Alas, here the author chooses very poor examples: "epidemiologists estimate that it was not until 1905 that you were better off going to a physician." What kind of person genuinely thinks that a statement can be made ABOUT ALL OF HUMANITY'S MEDICAL PROBLEMS before "1905"? What absurd norm would have crossed 50.00% probability on that year?

That is immediately followed by, "Semmelweiss noticed that doctors doubled the mortality rate of mothers at delivery". To someone familiar with Semmelweiss, this is nothing short of infuriating, and a caricature of his stellar observation skills. Semmelweiss was talking ABOUT THE CLINIC HE WORKED IN, IN WHICH CADAVERIC EXAMINATIONS OCCURRED, AND COMPARED IT WITH A CLINIC WITH ONLY MIDWIVES AND MUCH LOWER MORTALITY RATE. The statement makes it seem as if "Doctors" all over the world, from India to Europe to America, uniformly doubled the mortality rates of mothers.

"For thousands of years, the role of the physician pre-existed its rational function" this is a flagrant violation of all sense. He is essentially claiming that humanity since the dawn of time was totally fooled by doctors till 1905. Thankfully, humanity did not share this person's incapacity for discrimination, and went to doctors for things they thought the doctors could help with, and refrained from them for things they were doubtful of. This section is almost as bad as someone reading a 'vaidyaraja namstubhyam yamaraja sahodara' verse and declaring that all Indians ridiculed all doctors all the time.
Subscribe to Edge. ×. You can subscribe to Edge and receive e-mail versions of EdgeEditions as they are published on the web. Fill out the form, below, with your name and e-mail address and your subscription will be automatically processed. Email address *. Your name *. Country * ...
1
Add a comment...

Mohan K.V

Shared publicly  - 
 
~~~~ "The only real estate you'll ever really own is the space between your ears"

I was listening to some talk, and the lady said "You know, we keep hearing about this 'struggle for existence'. I've been watching animals for several decades now. It doesn't feel like a struggle -- it feels like they're all quite happy most of the time."

My first reaction was to refute this, but what she says is true. The "struggle for existence" is a narrative, a model that explains some structural features of life. But one's structural position need not have any bearing on how one thinks, feels or behaves: a gazelle in the wild has a pretty low structural place in the food chain, and may get hunted down any day, but he doesn't seem to be particularly aware of it, or indeed care too much. When calamity literally drops from a tree, well, off he goes. There's really no reason what he thinks should have any relation to what he is, where he's going, etc.

I think it's really the same thing everywhere. Whatever narrative we choose, it has consequences and associated behaviors. Consider:

1. Smearing vibhuti on forehead : holy burnt shit! Or maybe, it is a recognition that this magnificent edifice of life, this universe of universes, this incorrigible meaning-maker, is only separated by a sliver of time, vanishingly small, from being that very textureless powder that we'd normally hold in contempt.

2. Ego : Maybe you think of yourself as The Man, the Important Guy who does and says Important things, an Independent man who bows to none. Or maybe you think of yourself as a humble servant to a nobler cause, who must actively bend and bow to a whole host of authorities. Doesn't matter: either choice will take you to different places, get different kinds of people around you, makes you behave differently. In the former, you'll probably feel great about yourself except for the instances when you have to eat crow. But those don't last long, and you learn a lot from them anyway, so you'll quickly go back to that steady state. In the latter, you'll feel the joy of 'aDimai', except for instances when it conflicts with your innate urge to independence. But those too don't last long, and you'll go back to steady state. Whether you like those consequences, only you know (or may be really close friends)

3. Fate/God : You might think there is no such thing like Fate or God, and that the world runs by the actions of its inhabitants, and nothing else. Or maybe you think there is a benevolent God who is doing everything 'for a reason', and that 'everything happens for the good'. Or maybe you believe the opposite, that Fate is out to get you, and nothing ever works out for you because of a horoscope problem, or bad luck, or whatever. It doesn't matter: all narratives have consequences.

iTTa gandha boodi naama chaTTa kaTTalu nirnaama
2
Arvind Iyer's profile photoMohan K.V's profile photo
2 comments
 
Exceptional point!
Add a comment...

Mohan K.V

Shared publicly  - 
 
~~~~ Some thoughts on Piyush Goyal

Many months ago, I told an ex-manager that I admired minister Piyush Goyal's work. He challenged me to demonstrate his competence with data. I got some time now to put this together.

Goyal handles three ministries: Coal, Power and New & Renewable energy. In coal, his performance has been exceptional. In Power, it is good, but not anything great. In NRE, it has just been short of marketing fraud. Paradoxically, Goyal (and the Govt.) spends most of his time spouting achievements of the most fraudulent department, hardly drawing any attention to the stellar work he's doing elsewhere!

Coal

In the Ministry of Coal, Goyal predecessors were one Shriprakash Jaiswal in UPA-2 (unknown fellow), Manmohan Singh himself in UPA-1.

~80% of India's coal production is by one PSU, Coal India Limited. ~10% is by other PSUs, and ~10% by the private sector. Therefore, a Union minister has a decent amount of power to influence things.

(BTW, it is misallocation to that 10% private sector that was the cause of the Coalgate scam (whose highlights among other things were Baidyanath Ayurvedic Company gaining vast coal leases, and 85-year-old N.D. Tiwari's madam outing his sexcapades with teenage girls). As usual, the EIA has some excellent visual aids to help understand this sector: http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=22652 )

A glance at Coal India's annual production amply demonstrates the stellar work Goyal has done:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/13B4pDuRGpNXfu0Jla6zs8rkqhqayoE3GzTDV8SfN2hE/edit?usp=sharing

Some disaster occurred just after March 2010. Coal India suddenly stopped growing, and except for some statistical sputters, was pretty much in suspended animation for 4 whole years. We don't know what went wrong: bad executive appointments, letting labor unions run amok, stifling supply and distribution chains, maybe all of the above. Goyal has to be credited for reversing this, and taking the company to never-before-seen production rates. Another indicator of his success is that import of coal has reduced 7-8%.

We don't know how much money was spent doing this, but it's clear that a turnaround of this proportion cannot occur by just throwing money at the problem. We actually don't know what he actually did, because the Coal ministry's press releases are very terse and sparse: there have only been 13 releases from the ministry this year, and all have been technical and on-point. It also has some amazing targets: it plans to more than double the output of coal, from ~460 MT/y at the start of the Modi regime to 1000 MT/y by 2020! http://pib.nic.in/newsite/erelease.aspx -- This is solid stuff: lots of infrastructure investment, lots of jobs, auxiliary development, etc.

(Note how CIL production was quite decent through all of UPA-1. Note also how it responds to chaos of the 90's, to stabilize in Vajpayee's final stint. This one PSU's physical production results seems like it can be the barometer of the health of the nation's government!)

Power

Power is a much more complex issue. First of all, the Centre only owns 25% of power generating capacity. The states own 34%, and private parties own 41%. [Page 7 of CEA April exec summary]. This greatly limits what a Minister can do -- often just to act as a conduit between the Finance Ministry and the States, and collecting statistics. In this way, it is similar to the Department of Energy in advanced economics -- where the States pull the load and the Federal govt. simply coordinates. Alas, our nation's entire organizational capacity seems to be insufficient to even fill the centre, let alone have well-managed state PSUs.

Still, some progress has been made. The total installed capacity in India is ~300 GW. Of this, coal-based plants contribute the lion's share at 62% (185 GW). The ministry claims that 30 GW of coal-based capacity has been installed in the last 20 months of Modi's regime. Of course, some of this would have been begun before Modi's time, and only commissioned now. Still, it is a 16% increase over installed coal base, and one can believe that Goyal did move stalled projects along.

The real work, I think, has been done in increasing the capacity factors of the installed base. For example, in UPA-2 many coal plants had very unsteady supply of coal, and actually produced only 30-40% of their installed capacity. Goyal has pushed that to 60%, and wants to push it to 90%. His stellar work in the coal ministry would doubtless have helped do this. This is the hard work of securing supplies, stopping pilferage and raising efficiencies.

In addition, gas-based plants, which contribute ~8% (24.5 GW), face a perennial shortage of gas. There is no domestic gas, and imported LNG has been too costly thus far. Improving supplies to these will help their plant capacities as well.

An insightful EIA comparison of capacity factors for different kinds of plants from across the world: http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=22832

There has been some talk of laying new transmission lines, but most of that is unverifiable. Note that transmission lines affect the overall numbers in complex ways: if more lines are laid and more customers are served, but production is constant, the performance numbers in terms of deficits and percentages look worse. These must be viewed system-wide.

There is also quite an active power market, with power sold in 15-minute slabs (96 auctions a day). It has probably been in the work for years, but it's advanced to a degree that even a common man has access to the live market: http://www.vidyutpravah.in -- note how the power costs shoot up at peak hours

As a result of all this work, India as a whole has had record low power deficit numbers. The power deficit was near 10% for much of UPA-2, and only reluctantly lowered to 4.2% in the election year (trying to get fat babus to work). As soon as Modi and Goyal came on, it dropped to 3.6% and then 2.1%, the lowest ever. Per some models, many states might even have a power surplus in the coming year: http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/energy/power/for-the-first-time-in-history-india-will-not-have-power-deficit-situation-in-fy17/articleshow/52562666.cms

(Note: power surplus is measured with the transmission infrastructure in place. If a district consumes only 10 MW because it is very backward, 11 MW production would be counted as a 'surplus' of 1 MW even when all people are in the dark)

Of course, overall power surplus does not mean uniform power surplus: remember that states own 34% of the generating capacity and private parties 41%. The power-deficit states may choose to not buy power from outside, because doing so would open up markets and expose subsidy schemes, handouts and corrupt state electricity companies. Karnataka for example does not buy power from anywhere -- it prefers to keep its citizens in the dark rather than break its corrupt discoms. The Centre is trying, but it's a tough battle: http://www.firstpost.com/business/rescuing-state-discoms-uday-can-indeed-bring-a-new-dawn-but-will-states-let-it-rise-2502668.html

The power ministry also talks a lot about giving away LEDs. I doubt these will have any use -- like most giveaways, they will simply be sold in the black market. Maybe overall LED use will increase from that, but it'll probably be as some flashy sign in the city, whereas most village folks will continue to use incadescent bulbs. There is a lot of talk of 'village electrification', but there's no way to vet these numbers, so one can't say. Likewise for so-called transparency in reverse auctions, e-bidding etc. They say they're doing a good job, but there's little to substantiate it.

CEA Exec Summary April 2016: http://www.cea.nic.in/reports/monthly/executivesummary/2016/exe_summary-04.pdf (note the crappy graph on page 4 lower half.. what to do sir?).

MNRE

The Ministry of New & Renewable resources is the most publicized of the lot: there have been 22 press releases on PIB, and uncountable tweets, news stories and soundbytes shared by Goyal himself, Modi, and many others. Indeed, many people, including me before I spent some time on this, identified Goyal with renewable energies and the many revolutions going on in the area.

At the outset, it is clear why it can be dazzling: Prior to Modi's regime, the ministry was carried by lightweights. The total installed capacity for solar was only 2.3 GW. There was a "Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission" started in 2010 that envisioned touching 20 GW in 2020. The expectation was that it would maybe reach half that if all went well.

Suddenly, a revolution started in solar PV. Prices started plummetting post 2010: prices nearly halved, efficiencies rose, and auxiliary equipment became cheap and reliable. No one in MMS' cabinet cared -- how could they, with all the scams.

Enter Modi and Goyal. They declared that India would have 100 GW of solar TIC by 2020, FIVE TIMES the original ambitious target, and FORTY times what was installed thus far. This was a HUGE bet that prices would continue to drop, and probably a very wise one. In addition, plans were announced for 75 GW of other renewables. Considering that the TOTAL installed capacity when Modi entered was just 245 GW, he was proposing that by the end of his term he would add 175/245 = 71% of the ENTIRE CAPACITY OF THE NATION EVER BUILT, IN RENEWABLES ALONE. HOLY COW! And by every measure, they were doing it smartly: no over-centralization, lots of private sector stimulation, lots of internet-based procedures, etc. What was not to fall in love with?

The cracks to start to appear only when one probes deeper. It is not correct to compare total installed capacity of different kinds of generating plants. All that a nuclear, gas or coal plant needs is steady supply of good fuel -- and if it can be ensured, recorded capacity factors have been nearly 90%. So if a 100 GW of nuclear installed capacity is added, one can reasonably expect it to provide 90 GW baseload for decades.

Not so with solar. The best achieved capacity have been 20-25%, that too in highly favorable conditions (Deserts, high insolation, low-maintenance environments...). In many places, 10% is hard to get. If we're very generous and accept 20% for India, this 100 GW installed capacity only generates 20 GW in reality -- less than 8% of the actual generated energy mix when Modi came in, certainly not 71%. When measured in 2020, It's going to be an even lower number because conventional installed capacity (with high capacity factors) will grow quietly. It is not sexy at all.

And at what cost? The central government's planned subsidies alone are $100 B, or Rs. 6 lakh crore. All this to add 8% to the 2014 mix? If the same amount was spent on coal or nuclear, we could add 3-6x more capacity. One may make the environmental argument, and that's a separate discussion (where are the solar modules manufactured, land use, lifecycle toxicity, etc.), but an important economic decision is being made and I don't believe the options have been made clear.

As with most government programs, the costs don't end with capital. many state governments have agreed to buy power from these plants at anywhere between Rs. 7 - 15 per kW-hr. This, when the market clearing prices are of the order of Rs 1.5-2.5 per kW-hr. The Centre subsidizes this. http://www.vidyutpravah.in/

On top of this, the "entrepreneurs" setting up these plants are getting sweet loans from PSUs.

So if only you had a piece of dry land, you'd apply to set up a small power plant in one of these auctions. If you got lucky, you'd land a 20-year contract where the state government promises Rs. 7 / kW-hr, when in fact it could get it from else where at Rs. 1.5. You would then go to the bank, which would offer you Rs. 15 crore as loan. You would then buy the components from China, assemble them, and start selling power. You pay back the loan from the money you get from the government -- basically, you are a middle man in a futile cycle: your inputs are:

1. PSU loan
2. Guaranteed uptake rate from state govt.

Your outputs are

2. Payback PSU loan with interest to profit PSU

whatever delta goes into your pocket. The output from this futile cycle isn't even relevant -- just 8% of the energy mix. We have 70 years of experience from another such futile cycle, agriculture.

Scam 1: use generators running on subsidized diesel to produce energy that will be sold at guaranteed minimum uptake prices: https://plus.google.com/+MohanKV/posts/4tG9Gu3yGXV

Scam 2: Why bother with generating energy in the first place? If a price differential exists between 'normal' electricity and 'renewable' electricity, just buy normal electricity and sell it as 'renewable'. Maybe you'll need to buy a windmill as window-decoration, but it need not even turn one revolution: https://plus.google.com/+MohanKV/posts/gtuHWhP5Muj

--

If one is serious about setting up large scale solar- and wind-power plants to provide base load(which this government is not, considering that it is all delegated to states and private individuals), one hidden truth is that they have to have a gas or other fossil-fuel backup. If not, the plant can't guarantee an output, and no cash flow can be guaranteed. Would you buy energy from such a plant, or sign a contract with them?

There is also the skills element. With a conventional plant, there is tremendous amount of active employment at all stages, from construction to commissioning to operation. A big power plant is a complex beast, and needs people with specialized skill to work it. This gives a chance for people to develop such skills. As a side result, there is higher education, more professionalism, etc.

In contrast, a solar PV power plant is mostly 'set and forget'. Except for maybe security guards or occasional cleaning/change-outs, there isn't really any skill needed. Running solar PV plants has all the disadvantages of finding a nice oil well in your backyard.

Manufacturing solar-related equipment is another game entirely, and does involve a lot of skill. But that seems to not even feature here.

--

I'm ignoring some of the smaller developments: better websites, more automation in general, more scrutiny, etc. and also some of the negatives: other avenues to siphon money like power plant insurance, corrupt media, very shallow PR with no solid intellectual backing, etc.

--

There's an elephant in the room: the net nuclear installed capacity today is only 5.8 GW. That pittance also runs only at 60% capacity factor because it does not get steady fuel (it could easily run at 90%). None of Modi's vaunted phoren trips seem to be bearing fruit yet.

Neither are there any plans to set up more nuclear capacity. It would take 7-8 years, so I have a nasty feeling that the government doesn't care about anything which doesn't bear fruit in 5 years. The ball is entirely in Modi's court -- he holds the DAE.

Nuclear is the only way we can get energy security. Period.

--

In all this, I am again struck by how much of this is just narrative. Pick a nice story: 'A renewables revolution!', and bolster that story over time. If enough people find the story compelling and beautiful, your job is done. It doesn't really matter what you actually do -- it's only the story that matters.

--

All of this is written trusting the statistics of past production. It's one thing to fudge forecasts and predictions: hardly anyone gets them right anyway. But stats of the past, like quantity of coal produced or net power deficit in a past month are harder to fudge, because they show up in different forms in different places. So, I feel somewhat more comfortable relying on them.

However, experience with Indian statistics tells me that even very high level budget statistics and sworn Parliamentary written submittals can have fudges that would embarrass a high schooler forging his unit test marks card for dad's sign. Canonical Upamanyu Chatterjee reference: https://plus.google.com/+MohanKV/posts/XCyRFqzmvV9

--

Relevant postings by PIB: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1L4Ga-YV2ves5SDDOw2OlGuPNGN55cbAiiK9pywu4dr0/edit?usp=sharing
1
Ashish Hota's profile photoMohan K.V's profile photo
2 comments
 
Thanks :-)
Add a comment...

Mohan K.V

Shared publicly  - 
 
ROFLMAO Quora! This is almost as good as an Onion post to bring up anyone starts waxing eloquent about Indian/American/Cultural/Racial/Religious exceptionalism. The collapsed answers are the best!
Answer (1 of 9): I am Nigerian; i started and graduated high school at the ages of 8 and 14 respectively, failed my A levels, moved to the USA, graduated with an engineering associates degree with a 4.0 gpa and currently working on a bachelors and still maintaining a 4.0. So here's the thing, N...
1
Add a comment...

Mohan K.V

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
"After 15 minutes of answering emails at my desk I just knew this day was beyond salvaging."
HARTFORD, CT—Admitting that he was unlikely to accomplish anything despite giving his best effort, local claims adjuster David Furman told reporters Thursday that he had effectively chalked up the day as a loss by 10:15 this morning.
5 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Mohan K.V

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
I'm not actually sure whether or not Paul Ryan's phrasing here was intentional.
93 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
634 people
krishna murthy's profile photo
Aditya Sivagnanam's profile photo
Manoj Singh's profile photo
toni goncalves's profile photo
Raghavendra Nagaraja's profile photo
anil kumar's profile photo
M A Rafee's profile photo
peddapalyam maheswara's profile photo
Manish Sahai's profile photo

Mohan K.V

Shared publicly  - 
 
Fascinating talk, not for the narrative, but for the historical anecdotes. "This was the golden age of piracy, where pirates like Teach were terrorizing the high seas. Colonial trade was flourishing, and piracy was highly profitable. And the smarter pirates like him realized that to maximize their spoils, they needed to attack their enemies so brutally that they would surrender on sight. So in other words, they could take the ships without wasting ammunition, or incurring casualties.
2:50
So Edward Teach redesigned himself as Blackbeard by playing the part of a merciless brute. He wore heavy jackets and big hats to accentuate his height. He grew the bushy black beard that obscured his face. He slung braces of pistols on either shoulder. He even attached matches to the brim of his hat and set them alight, so they sizzled menacingly whenever his ship was poised to attack. And like many pirates of that era, he flew a flag that bore the macabre symbols of a human skull and a pair of crossed bones, because those motifs had signified death in so many cultures for centuries, that their meaning was instantly recognizable, even in the lawless, illiterate world of the high seas: surrender or you'll suffer. So of course, all his sensible victims surrendered on sight.
3:43
Put like that, it's easy to see why Edward Teach and his fellow pirates could be seen as pioneers of modern communications design"
In this ode to design renegades, Alice Rawsthorn highlights the work of unlikely heroes, from Blackbeard to Florence Nightingale. Drawing a line from these bold thinkers to some early modern visionaries like Buckminster Fuller, Rawsthorn shows how the greatest designers are often the most rebellious.
1
Add a comment...

Mohan K.V

Shared publicly  - 
 
~~~~ Food and behavior

I used think that theories that suggested that food influences behavior were nonsense ('Eating a lot of chillies makes you an angry person' -- well, maybe on their way out when you're regretting the decision, but come on!, or "Eating buffalo yogurt makes you dull and lazy" -- this was supposedly the ploy tried on the poet Srinatha by jealous court poets who had his mom's always-worried--about-whether-her-son-was-eating-enough-like-every-mom's ear). After all, it's all carbs, proteins and fat, right?

After repeated experimentation with low-carb, though, I think there's a nugget of truth in such theories.

For the moment, let's ignore the momentary effects -- sometimes one craves certain foods, and eating them makes one happy, and if one can't find them it makes one annoyed. There is also a sense of deep contentment from eating a good meal. These are trivial versions of the theory which are obviously true. We're looking at something deeper.

When I'm on low carb, I feel that I have much more mental and physical energy than otherwise. I have been in and out so often now that I don't need ketostix or any such thing to know -- it is almost like waking up and stretching and feeling the strength in my muscles, almost like some Avatar shit. "More energy" does not do justice to that all-pervasive feeling at all. 5-mile runs are no biggie and seem effortless, whereas in a regular diet I can barely cajole myself to run a mile before my willpower is spent. I now understand how people can function fine with some 5 hours of sleep.

It isn't just that: I somehow feel like I hold the reins to my mind and body more firmly, and have more strength of will. A higher sense of inner security, and so a more dominant, aggressive stance on things. Very little mental chatter, vivid dreams. Each breath feels 'fuller', almost as if my lungs have expanded. There's a kind of 'spring' in anything I do, like swimming, lifting or even writing.

This is after all the physiological things: lower BP, lower RMSSD and 'firmer' heartbeats, marked diuresis, no BG spikes, ketogenic insulin resistance, weight loss, the whole shebang.

We are universes of universes...
1
Add a comment...

Mohan K.V

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
"Today, the decision to spend your life with someone is frequently made under duress."
HYATTSVILLE, MD—Noting a generational shift in the way couples choose to build their lives together, the National Center for Health Statistics confirmed this week that a growing number of Americans are delaying marriage until one partner backs the o...
4 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Mohan K.V

Shared publicly  - 
 
~~~~ I was randomly going through the India Parliament stats, and noticed a couple things.

Consider this list of MPs ranked on the number of questions they have asked: http://india60.com/mps/activity?sort=aquestions

The most curious chap is someone I've never heard of in the papers. The second most curious chap, Owaisi, is a widely hated person in many media, but his questions have always been very pointed and insightful (if annoying). He has decent attendance and good debate performance. He is well-educated. He is engaging fully with the concept of Parliamentary debate. He's doing his job.

Aside from Owaisi, the only names I recognize in the top 50 are Supriya Sule (widely reviled) and Varun Gandhi (mixed opinions). Virtually all others are unheard of.

In contrast, look at the worst performers: http://india60.com/mps/activity?page=10&sort=aquestions -- the toast of the media is here. Look at the next page -- I am not sure if it is 0% because of a data glitch, or if these people never turned up. It's likely they never turned up.

It is not for nothing that so many people feel India's implementation of democracy is meaningless -- the most influential politicians are shouting out their contempt for every component of it by their actions.

On a happy note though, I was very pleased to see some MP named Bhartruhari: http://india60.com/mps/profile/bhartruhari-mahtab (His wife's name is Mahasweta Mahtab). He also has very high attendance and participation.
A directory of India's Lok Sabha Members of Parliament (MPs)
1
Add a comment...

Mohan K.V

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
"I'm not ready to scrape the bottom of the barrel just yet."
MUSKEGON, MI–Despite the urgings of friends and coworkers, Eileen MacKay and Doug Traschel refuse to lower their standards enough to date each other.
5 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Mohan K.V

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
"It went by so fast, though—I have to do it again!"
SANDUSKY, OH—Immediately standing up from his seat and striding quickly past other visitors as soon as the snack was over, Cedar Point amusement park patron Paul Matazaro reportedly raced back to the end of the line for another funnel cake Thursday.
4 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...
Mohan's Collections
People
Have him in circles
634 people
krishna murthy's profile photo
Aditya Sivagnanam's profile photo
Manoj Singh's profile photo
toni goncalves's profile photo
Raghavendra Nagaraja's profile photo
anil kumar's profile photo
M A Rafee's profile photo
peddapalyam maheswara's profile photo
Manish Sahai's profile photo
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Work
Employment
  • Student, present
Mohan K.V's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
The Emergency
caravanmagazine.in

"DON'T BURY THEM IN THE MORNING" IT WAS ALMOST LUNCHTIME when the school kids made a run for it. A blur of red-and-grey chequered uniforms,

Inside Man
caravanmagazine.in

| ONE | IN THE COSMOS of the Indian establishment, the Supreme Court is a central galaxy. Its brightest stars, the senior advocates, can be

What the science of human nature can teach us
www.newyorker.com

Online version of the weekly magazine, with current articles, cartoons, blogs, audio, video, slide shows, an archive of articles and abstrac

Best of Nithyasree Mahadevan
ww.smashits.com

Best of Nithyasree Mahadevan songs - Best of Nithyasree Mahadevan 2001 Music Album - Best of Nithyasree Mahadevan Carnatic Music

It'd been years since I'd taken an eye exam, and needed one per my company's policy. I had a *fantastic* experience at Westside. +Dr. Thao Nguyen is exceptional, and her staff are thorough professionals. I didn't have vision insurance, but their pricing was very reasonable. Heartily recommended!
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
1 review
Map
Map
Map