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Mirrix Tapestry & Bead Looms
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Find all our our Mirrix tutorials here: http://bit.ly/1GRikxh
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Why warp spacing matters: http://bit.ly/1LT2WET #sett #weaving #tapestry 
This blog post is part of a series on the basics of weaving tapestry. IMG_9452 Tapestry is by definition weft-faced weaving. This means that you can see the weft (the fiber that you weave back and forth) and cannot see the warp (the fiber you wrap around your loom). To achieve this, a weaver ...
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Happy 4th of July! Great older post by Mirrix's CEO on why we make our products in America: http://bit.ly/1GTZgDT
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Do you follow Mirrix CEO Claudia Chase on Instagram? http://bit.ly/1C2Gitw
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Check out our tapestry weaving time-lapse here: http://bit.ly/1JxRJJT
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"Tapestry is like painting. The warp creates a canvas on which one paints with fiber. But unlike painting, the final and necessary structure of the “canvas” is only created once the weft is applied. Hence, tapestry becomes a very architectural kind of artwork since the structure is created from the bottom up. What was woven at the beginning cannot be changed after the fact. One does not have the luxury of the whole page to play with since the page only exists in the tapestry as the “paint” is applied. It’s an interesting constraint that can create as many mistakes as accidental successes. But whereas tapestry is like painting, it is also still weaving and hence takes its own unique place in the world of art." http://bit.ly/1NlOWVj…/ (re-post from 2008)
Tapestry and cloth weaving have less in common than their sharing of the word “weaving” would indicate. Both are indeed weaving and share the following characteristics: They rely on the interlacement of warp and weft; the warps (the threads that are attached to the loom) run parallel to each ...
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This heart tapestry starter package is one of our favorites, and it's a fantastic deal! http://bit.ly/1C2H2is
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Check out some of our Mirrix #videos here: http://bit.ly/1GRilRY
We have videos on warping, weaving, using different kits and more! Visit our YouTube channel to see all our videos! Warping for Bead Weaving: Warping for Fiber Weaving: How to Weave Beads: How to Weave Fiber (and all about Tapestry Weaving): Everything But The Kitchen Sink (recorded webinar) ...
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Get 50% off Mirrix's Craftsy class "Bead & Tapestry Cuffs" with this link: http://craftsy.me/1C2GzfZ
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We always love reading Janette Meetze's blog posts! Check out her latest one here: http://bit.ly/1GRgHzF
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The Mirrix Looms Ambassador program hopes to unite Mirrix Looms (both the company and the products) with talented bead and tapestry weavers from around the world. By connecting these gifted artists, quality weaving equipment and the networks of both, the hope is to simultaneously increase awareness of each ambassador and of Mirrix products. Meet our Mirrix Looms Ambassadors here: http://bit.ly/1g3TKUb
The Mirrix Looms Ambassador program hopes to unite Mirrix Looms (both the company and the products) with talented bead and tapestry weavers from around the world. By connecting these gifted artists, quality weaving equipment and the networks of both, the hope is to simultaneously increase ...
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One of the biggest problems beginning tapestry weavers have is that, as they weave up, they begin to pull in the edges of their piece. In the language of tapestry we’d call this drawing in your selvedges. This can cause the piece to look sloppy and uneven. For some tips on how to prevent this, check out this blog post: http://bit.ly/1eVYfjF
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Contact Information
Contact info
Phone
603-547-6278
Email
Address
1097 Bible Hill Rd. Francestown, NH 03043
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Mirrix Looms manufactures high-quality tapestry and bead weaving looms.
Introduction

Mirrix Tapestry and Bead Looms LLC makes portable, metal looms that have a variety of uses (from tapestry and bead weaving to wire weaving) and can be used from beginners to professional artists alike. They are manufactured in the United States of America out of copper, aluminum, threaded steel rod and finished with handmade wooden clips.