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VETERAN STRATEGIC I.T. TRAINING ALLIANCE
VETERAN STRATEGIC I.T. TRAINING ALLIANCE

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Industry Certifications - Michael is authorized to teach the following
MiCHael I. Kaplan is a Corporate Information Security Officer, certified Mile2 Cyber Security Instructor, and a passionate advocate for military veteran issues with 21 years of experience in the security industry.  After serving honorably in the US Army’s 1...

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OPM, Cybersecurity Resource Center, gov/cybersecurity/cybersecurity-incidents
Published by LinkedIn · January 31 at 8:53pm · OPM, Cybersecurity Resource Center “What Happened,” https://www.opm . gov/cybersecurity/cybersecurity-incidents 310.8 Integrity Principle (CIMA): The principle of integrity imposes an obligation on all members ...

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Focus Management: The New Normal for Project
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CompTIA Project+
http://certification.comptia.org/certifications/project
Find out more about the CompTIA Project+ certification.

https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/social-media-security
Boost your Career with a Certification

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Being part of the solution....

Developing the creation of long-term value for the United States from customers, markets, and relationships.
https://plus.google.com/106482978381735583531https://plus.google.com/106482978381735583531Total e Solutions Wilson
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE (DOD) CYBER STRATEGY

An engine of innovation and communication, the Internet connects billions of people, helps deliver goods and services globally, and brings ideas and knowledge to those who would otherwise lack access. The United States relies on the Internet and the systems and data of cyberspace for a wide range of critical services. This ...reliance leaves us vulnerable in the face of a real and dangerous cyber threat, as state and non-state actors plan to conduct disruptive and destructive cyber attacks on the networks of our critical infrastructure and steal U.S. intellectual property to undercut our technological and military advantage.

Rock on! IT Apprenticeship
An Innovative and Proven Skill Validation Process! IT Apprenticeship is a workforce development system that integrates education, certification and skill validation through an innovative coaching system, resulting in a more effective workforce. IT Apprenticeship web-based tracking system allows employers to track how training leads to achievement of business objectives. Become an IT Professional IT professionals work in every industry and have many career opportunities. IT Apprenticeship Concentrations identify the foundational knowledge objectives, vendor-neutral certifications and a unique on-the-job learning component built around industry standard competencies. Becoming an IT Professional IT professionals work in every industry and have many career opportunities More details... IT Apprenticeship helps Students & Individuals get started on a career in IT IT Apprenticeship helps IT workers develop and validate critical competencies. IT Apprenticeship helps Companies develop and validate worker abilities to make them more productive IT Apprenticeship helps Education Institutions & Training Providers bring their benefit beyond the classroom and into the workplace. Become an IT Professional IT professionals work in every industry and have many career opportunities. Apprenticeship We offer multiple IT Apprenticeship tracks ⦁ IT Generalist ⦁ Project Management ⦁ Information Assurance & Security ⦁ Help Desk ⦁ Network Infrastructure and Devices ⦁ Database Services Apprentice can be a student, unemployed worker or a full-time employee of a Sponsor company. Apprentices can: ⦁ Create their own profile of current credentials ⦁ Register for a particular Concentration ⦁ Start earning hours of classroom instruction and certifications ⦁ Work with a coach to obtain on-the-job learning ⦁ Apprentices can only complete their concentration after gaining full-time employment and sign-offs on all competencies Learn More Veteran I.T. Training, Apprenticeship & Employment Consultancy Specifically, as applicable to apprenticeship, recruitment and sourcing of veterans interested in and pursing, I.T. training, certification and apprenticeship. If veteran has an interest in employment or change of employer, successful placement by means of networking veterans with applicable job boards, HR managers, Recruiters and Staffing companies. Offer assistance to veterans on how to fine tune their skills with processes of interviewing techniques, proper development of their resume, networking, etc.




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Connecting Veterans With IT Jobs
We're proud to connect with the 100,000 Jobs Mission
At Modis, we are a proud member of the 100,000 Jobs Mission and support its goal of placing and assisting veterans in the jobs of their choice. America's military members and veterans have so willingly served our country, we want to return the favor and serve them. To show our appreciation for their sacrifice and commitment, we are proud to offer our network of resources to help transition them into exciting IT jobs at leading companies.
If You Are a Military Veteran Looking for an IT Job, Connect With Us
Whether you're looking to get your foot in the door in the industry, or you're transitioning back in, we have the resources to connect you with exceptional opportunities at over 2,000 leading companies, including two-thirds of the Fortune 100. Take the first step and learn more about the exceptional IT jobs we have to offer.
About the Mission
One of the biggest challenges facing those in the armed services is finding good jobs when leaving active duty. With that in mind, the 100,000 Jobs Mission was formed in 2011 with a commitment to place and support our veterans. It began as a coalition of eleven companies committed to hiring 100,000 veterans by 2020. Since then, the coalition has grown to more than 160 companies that represent almost every industry. With the support and growth of the companies involved, they have raised their goal of hiring a total of 200,000 veterans by 2020.
Learn more about the 100,000 Jobs Mission

Learn all about Modis, our history and our culture.
· Press Room
Read our articles, press releases and surveys.
· Fast Facts
Want the short version? Read the Modis Fast Facts.
· Contact
Let us know what you need and we can help.
· U.S. Olympic Team Sponsor
We are a proud sponsor of the U.S. Olympic Team.
· Veteran Jobs
We’re member of the 100,000 Jobs Mission.
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· Press Room
· Fast Facts
· Contact
· U.S. Olympic Team Sponsor
· Veteran Jobs
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5. About
6. Fast Facts
Fast Facts
Modis. The short version.
Our growth record and industry leadership is a result of our unique culture of treating every challenge as unique and delivering a solution that is perfectly suited. We listen. We innovate. We’re accountable. As such, the stats below should only be taken as a snapshot of our business today. Tomorrow, we’ll have accomplished more, solved more human capital management challenges and put more people in their perfect jobs.
Information Technology Staffing Services:
· Temporary
· Temp-to-Hire
· Direct Placement
· Project Management
· Consulting
Global Presence:
· Strong presence in the United States, Canada, and Europe
· More than 1 million IT candidates in our proprietary database
· Breadth of solutions to optimize client mix of contractors, staff and projects
Differentiators:
· Pre-screened, rigorously reviewed talent
· Only on-target candidates submitted for review
· Guaranteed Delivery Program with no-risk 40 hour trial period
· Faster time to performance
· Tremendous geographic reach
· Customized account management programs
Established:
· Serving Fortune 1000, mid-market and government clients in every industry
· Specialization in high tech
· Unique Guaranteed Delivery Program
· Recognized by all 50 states as approved or preferred vendor.
Capabilities:
· Web Development
· Mainframe Programming
· Enterprise Systems Analysis and Integration
· Business Analysis
· Software Development and Engineering
· Database Design, Development and Administration
· Network Design and Administration
· Help Desk and Technical Support
· Project Management
· Technical Support
· Technical Writing
· Security
Want to know more? Take a look at our national press releases to see just some of the clients we’ve been working with or contact the Modis Office in your area.
Stay Ahead of the Evolution
With 18% growth in tech jobs projected by 2022, the tech revolution has created significant competition for skilled talent within the sector. Our 2015 Salary Guide is an invaluable tool for every employer hiring within IT. Filled with the most up-to-date salary data and job descriptions for IT jobs, plus in-depth insight into the future of our industry, our Salary Guide is your blueprint for success
IT White Papers - Connect With Tech Knowledge
At Modis, we stay at the forefront of the evolving world of technology and the ever-changing IT industry. Our IT staffing experts have an unmatched understanding of their local job markets, trends in the IT sector, the state of the economy, current salary data and workplace issues. We're happy to share our knowledge, connecting you with relevant and influential information to keep you in the know and stay competitive. Feel free to download our IT white papers and be sure to check back frequently – we constantly update this page with our latest insights.
Download Your Free Copy of Our New White Paper:
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2016 Tech Employment Report by Region
Check out this white paper for the technical lowdown on tech employment, from recent and future unemployment trends, to the projected growth for specific IT jobs, to what U.S. political leaders think about our field.
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Fostering Diversity and Inclusion in the Tech Workforce
Get a demographic breakdown of tech, learn about the benefits of diversity, and learn how to build a diverse team of tech pros. Read our white paper and share it with your colleagues.
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Looking to the Future: How the Tech Industry is Changing
Our white paper reviews a survey that questioned working-age Americans about the future of our industry. Do they think the U.S. will continue to be a technology leader? Do they think job growth will continue for techies? Get your free copy to get answers to those questions and learn what you can do to attract top talent.
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Annual Employment Report by Region and IT Job Growth Projections
Long-term IT job growth projections indicate that tech jobs are on the rise, outperforming the overall U.S. employment market. Download the Annual Regional Employment Report provided by Modis to learn more.
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Meeting Exceptional Security Challenges
To combat cyberattacks, businesses must implement a cybersecurity strategy. Learn more about tips and best practices for stronger IT security in 2015 with our free white paper.
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What Startups Can Teach Us About Employee Engagement
Recent hiring trends show that IT departments are moving away from outsourcing their talent. Download our free white paper to find out why.
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Moving Away From Outsourcing: IT Department Trends
Startups are more than just a tech trend, they’re turning into a cultural phenomenon impacting hiring trends, HR and employee expectations. Download your free white paper to learn how your company can adapt.
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Create Your Dream Team
Whether you compete in the athletic arena or the business arena, assembling the right team can mean the difference between winning and losing. Explore our white paper to find out how you can put winners in your workforce and develop a winning approach to bringing them all together.
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Making Tomorrow’s Connections Today
With the end of the year quickly approaching, businesses are likely to put their IT hiring on hold. However, waiting until the New Year could be detrimental to your IT workforce and your organization as a whole. Our new white paper breaks down the importance of filling your tech positions with top talent today, and it gives you the inside info you need to get ahead on hiring – and your competition.
Archived White Papers »
Tech Jobs On The Rise
There's no question about it – the IT workforce is evolving quickly. At Modis, we continually track hiring, salary and industry trends to help you better understand and prepare for these changes, and navigate the complex technology job market. Based on our latest research and findings, we're forecasting some fantastic growth in the tech industry in the very near future.
If you’re interested in learning more, get your copy of our 2016 Modis Salary Guide for Tech Professionals. It's filled with industry insights, salary ranges by city and detailed job descriptions
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Security
Below are the typical Security job descriptions staffed by Modis. View our other positions by visiting Job Categories or to inquire about a specific need, fill our brief contact form.

Detailed IT Job Descriptions Across the Industry
The advent of new technologies has changed the makeup of the IT industry - and the IT workforce that supports it. New roles have emerged, old ones have faded away and some have blended together to reflect the convergence of technology itself.
Even for the most experienced IT and business leader, keeping track of all the professionals that comprise today’s IT departments can be a challenge, and understanding the specific talents required of each different employee can be downright impossible.
Our detailed IT job descriptions can help make it a little easier by breaking down the specific skills and experience requirements of thousands of IT positions. They also detail day-to-day responsibilities and expectations.
So whether you're looking to evaluate someone for a promotion or to fill in some skills gaps with new employees, you can find the job description templates you need to power up your IT team.
IT Job Descriptions By Category
Analysts >
These experts use their knowledge to evaluate existing applications, data, hardware and other systems in order to recommend enhancements.
Related job descriptions: Applications system analyst, business data analyst, business systems analyst, information technology auditor, quality control analyst
Database Development, Administration & Business Intelligence >
Data drives intelligent business decisions, and these employees know how to store it, manage it, interpret it and apply it.
Related job descriptions: Data Architect, Data Management Director, Database Analyst, Database Report Writer, Data Warehouse Manager
Enterprise Systems Analysis & Integration >
Companies have made huge investments in enterprise systems, and these professionals help those investments pay off.
Related job descriptions: CRM specialist, ERP analyst, ERP project manager, operating systems programmer, SAP Project Manager, Systems Architect
Health IT >
The HiTech Act, ICD-10/11 requirements and the growing reliance on Electronic Health Records demands professionals with expertise that encompasses both IT and healthcare. For providers and payers alike, these professionals deliver.
Related job descriptions: Ambulatory Systems Analyst, Clinical Systems Analyst, Health Information Management (HIM) Project Manager, Interface Analyst, Revenue Cycle Architect/Builder
Management & Project Management >
IT is fast paced. Using project management skills, these individuals help their teams keep up.
Related job descriptions: Data Center Director, IT Project Coordinator, IT Project Manager, IT Technology Manager, Project Engineering Manager
Network/System Design & Administration >
Your internal and external customers expect their experience on your network to be seamless. Professionals in this sector, relying on knowledge of GIS, Java, .Net and other techniques, make it happen.
Related job descriptions: Enterprise Infrastructure Architect, Messaging Engineer, Network Administrator, Network Control Technician, Network Engineer, Systems Administrator
Programming/Software Engineering >
Using their impressive technical skill sets, these experts design, develop and maintain software.
Related job descriptions: Applications Engineer, Applications Systems Architect, Mainframe Programmer, Software Architect, Software Engineer, Software Quality Assurance Analyst
Security >
Your intellectual property is valuable, and so is the consumer data you store. Protect it with the right experts.
Related job descriptions: Data Security Analyst, Data Security Manager Data Security Supervisor, IS Security Manager, Systems/Application Security Analyst
Technical Support >
Your systems, hardware and software can only provide value when it is working and fully functional. Technical Support professionals make sure it always is.
Related job descriptions: Computer Operator, Customer Service Representative, Help Desk Manager/Supervisor, Installation & Maintenance Technician, LAN/WAN Administrator, Technical Support Analyst
Technical Writing >
IT is a language all its own. These experts help interpret it, record it and translate it into business terms for your business’ leaders.
Related job descriptions: Documentation Specialist, Web Editor, Technical Trainer, Technical Writer
Web Development & Administration >
From content to design to UX, these pros can keep your web presence current and engagement.
Related job descriptions: Content Engineer, Designer, Graphical User Interface (GUI) Programmer, Interface Design Director, Web Applications Developer, Webmaster

Chief Information Security Officer
Acts as the authority for enterprise security standards and policies. Develops information security standards and has ultimate responsibility for the security and functionality of information systems. Relies on extensive knowledge and professional discretion to achieve goals. Usually reports to senior management. Manages others. Significant ingenuity and flexibility is expected. Requires a bachelor’s degree with at least 12 years of experience in the field.
Data Security Analyst
Installs and maintains security software. Instructs computer users on security policies and procedures. Monitors network activity and ensures data is protected from unauthorized users. Identifies, reports and resolves security violations. Relies on established guidelines and instructions to perform daily job functions. Works under immediate supervision and usually reports to a supervisor. May require a bachelor’s degree and 0–2 years of relevant experience.
Data Security Analyst, Sr.
Installs and maintains security software. Instructs computer users on security policies and procedures. Monitors network activity and ensures data is protected from unauthorized users. Identifies, reports and resolves security violations. Relies on knowledge and professional discretion to plan and achieve goals. Works under general supervision and usually reports to a supervisor, though some ingenuity and flexibility is required. May require a bachelor’s degree and 2–4 years of relevant experience.
Data Security Manager
Manages and oversees systems to protect data from unauthorized access. Creates and implements policies and procedures for identifying, recording and addressing security violations. Relies on extensive knowledge and professional discretion to achieve goals. Usually reports to a department head. Manages others. Significant ingenuity and flexibility is expected. May require a bachelor’s degree in area of specialty and at least 7 years of field experience.
Data Security Supervisor
Supervises the data security team and related activity to protect systems from unauthorized access. Identifies, records and addresses security violations. Relies on knowledge and professional discretion to achieve goals. Usually reports to a department head. Manages others. Significant ingenuity and flexibility is expected. May require a bachelor’s degree in area of specialty and at least 4 years of field experience.
Information Security Administrator
Implements network security policies, protects network from unauthorized access, monitors network usage and resolves access issues. Relies on extensive knowledge and professional discretion to achieve goals. Usually reports to a supervisor. May manage others. Significant ingenuity and flexibility is expected. Requires a bachelor’s degree with at least 5 years of field experience.
Information Security Analyst I
Instructs computer users on security policies and procedures. Monitors network activity and ensures data is protected from unauthorized users. Identifies, reports and resolves security violations. Relies on established guidelines and instructions to perform daily job functions. Works under immediate supervision and usually reports to a supervisor. May require a bachelor’s degree and 0–2 years of relevant experience.
Information Security Analyst II
Monitors network activity and ensures data is protected from unauthorized users. Identifies, reports and resolves security violations. Mostly relies on established guidelines and instructions to perform daily job functions though some ingenuity and flexibility is required. Instructs computer users on security policies and procedures. Works under immediate supervision and usually reports to a supervisor. Requires a bachelor’s degree and 2 years of relevant experience.
Information Security Analyst, Sr.
Instructs computer users on security policies and procedures. Monitors network activity and ensures data is protected from unauthorized users. Identifies, reports and resolves security violations. Relies on knowledge and professional discretion to plan and achieve goals. Works under general supervision and usually reports to a supervisor, though some ingenuity and flexibility is required. May require a bachelor’s degree and 2–4 years of relevant experience.
Information Security Analyst, Lead
Monitors network activity for threats and ensures data is protected from unauthorized users. Conducts detailed security event analysis. Reviews security event activities to identify trends for potential efficiency and potential gaps with services Relies on knowledge and professional discretion to plan and achieve goals. Works under general supervision and usually reports to a supervisor, though ingenuity and flexibility is required. Instructs computer users on security policies and procedures Requires a bachelor’s degree and 7-8 years of relevant experience.
Information Security Director
Responsible for specific information security functions and the goals, budgets, team, policies and procedures within a security department. Manages direct reports to accomplish security initiatives. Reports to a security department VP, CISO or even CIO. Promotes information security initiatives and awareness. Requires a bachelor’s degree, security certifications, leadership experience and at least 8 years of information security experience.
Information Security Manager
Develops and oversees information systems security. Manages IT security analysts to ensure that all applications are functional and secure. Relies on extensive knowledge and professional discretion to achieve goals. Manages others. Usually reports to senior management. Significant creativity and latitude is expected. Requires a bachelor’s degree with at least 6–8 years of field experience.
Information Security Supervisor
Supervises the data security team and related activity to protect systems from unauthorized access. Identifies, records and addresses security violations. Relies on knowledge and professional discretion to achieve goals. Usually reports to a department head. Manages others. Significant ingenuity and flexibility is expected. May require a bachelor’s degree in area of specialty and at least 4 years of field experience.
Information Security Vice President
Responsible for specific information security functions and the goals, budgets, team, policies and procedures within a security department. Manages direct reports to accomplish security initiatives. Reports to CISO, CIO and or board of directors. Promotes information security initiatives and awareness. Requires a bachelor’s degree, security certifications, leadership experience and at least 10 years of information security experience.
Information Security Engineer I
Provides some technical security expertise across a broad range of security tools within an environment. Assists in oversight, and ongoing management of the information security programs and technical systems. Relies on established guidelines and instructions to perform daily job functions. Works under immediate supervision and usually reports to a supervisor. May require a Bachelor’s degree and 0-3 years of relevant experience.
Information Security Engineer II
Provides security expertise of security tools within an environment.. Assists in oversight, and ongoing management of the information security programs and technical systems. Relies on established guidelines and instructions to perform daily job functions. Works under general supervision and usually reports to a supervisor though some ingenuity and flexibility is required. May require a Bachelor’s degree and 4-6 years of relevant experience.
Information Security Engineer III
Provides security expertise of security tools within an environment. Planning, deployment, and management of network security devices. Creation of technically detailed reports, rules, change management and policies for security devices. Typically works under general supervision. Bachelor’s degree in related area plus 6-8 years’ relevant experience required.
Systems/Application Security Analyst
Evaluates information security systems and applications and suggests enhancements. Relies on extensive knowledge and professional discretion to achieve goals. Usually reports to a department head. Significant ingenuity and flexibility is expected. Requires a bachelor’s degree with at least 5 years of field experience.



Web Development and Administration
Below are the typical Web Development and Administration job descriptions staffed by Modis. View our other positions by visiting Job Categories or to inquire about a specific need, fill our brief contact form.
Content Engineer I
Determines content and structure for websites. Designs interface and navigation tools. Conducts page-level testing. Establishes code standards and oversees code reviews. Evaluates specifications and issues project timelines and schedules. Relies on established guidelines and instructions to perform daily job functions. Works under immediate supervision and usually reports to a supervisor. May require a bachelor’s degree in a related area and 0-2 years of relevant experience.
Content Engineer II
Determines content and structure for websites. Designs interface and navigation tools. Conducts page-level testing. Establishes code standards and oversees code reviews. Evaluates specifications and issues project timelines and schedules. Relies on knowledge and professional discretion to plan and accomplish goals. Works under general supervision and usually reports to a supervisor, though some ingenuity and flexibility is required. May require a bachelor’s degree in a related area and 2-4 years of relevant experience.
Content Engineer III
Determines content and structure for websites. Designs interface and navigation tools. Conducts page-level testing. Establishes code standards and oversees code reviews. Evaluates specifications and issues project timelines and schedules. Relies on knowledge and professional discretion to plan and accomplish goals. Usually reports to a department head. May manage others. Significant ingenuity and flexibility is expected. May require a bachelor’s degree in a related area and at least 5 years of relevant experience.
Content Manager
Manages all content and projects related to the website. Writes, edits and proofreads new content. Ensures that all documents meet established content standards and works with developers to assess any technical challenges in displaying the content. Relies on extensive knowledge and professional discretion to plan and accomplish goals. Usually reports to senior management. Manages others. Significant ingenuity and flexibility is expected. Requires a bachelor’s degree in a related area and at least 7 years of relevant experience.
Content Specialist
Helps with the development and implementation of content for websites. May assist writers and designers in producing a final layout in accordance with company standards. Relies on established guidelines and instructions to perform daily job functions. Works under immediate supervision and usually reports to a supervisor or manager. Requires a bachelor’s degree with 0-2 years of experience. May be expected to have knowledge of HTML, DHTML and JavaScript programming language.
Designer I
Develops graphics and designs and organizes copy for online publication. Ensures copy and graphics are appropriately arranged in accordance with company guidelines and visual best practices. May select font styles, sizes and other elements to enhance overall aesthetics. Relies on established guidelines and instructions to perform daily job functions. Works under immediate supervision and usually reports to a supervisor. May require an associate’s degree or its equivalent and 2 years of relevant experience.
Designer II
Develops graphics and designs and organizes copy for online publication. Ensures copy and graphics are appropriately arranged in accordance with company guidelines and visual best practices. May select font styles, sizes and other elements to enhance overall aesthetics. Relies on limited knowledge and professional discretion to plan and accomplish goals. Works under general supervision and usually reports to a supervisor, though some ingenuity and flexibility is required. May require an associate’s degree or its equivalent and 3 years of relevant experience.
Designer III
Develops graphics and designs and organizes copy for online publication. Ensures copy and graphics are appropriately arranged in accordance with company guidelines and visual best practices. May select font styles, sizes and other elements to enhance overall aesthetics. Relies on knowledge and professional discretion to plan and accomplish goals. Usually reports to a supervisor. Significant ingenuity and flexibility is expected. May require an associate’s degree or its equivalent and 4 years of relevant experience.
Graphical User Interface (GUI) Programmer I
Designs and develops web applications. Encodes, tests, debugs and supports new and existing programs. Has knowledge of C++ language programming, XMotif programming interfaces, GUI API packages and other GUI principles. Relies on established guidelines and instructions to perform daily job functions. Works under immediate supervision and usually reports to a project leader or manager. May require a bachelor’s degree in a related area and 0-3 years of relevant experience.
Graphical User Interface (GUI) Programmer II
Designs and develops web applications. Encodes, tests, debugs and supports new and existing programs. Has knowledge of C++ language programming, XMotif programming interfaces, GUI API packages and other GUI principles. Relies on limited knowledge and professional discretion to plan and accomplish goals. Works under general supervision and usually reports to a project leader or manager, though some ingenuity and flexibility is required. May require a bachelor’s degree in a related area and 2-5 years of relevant experience.
Graphical User Interface (GUI) Programmer III
Designs and develops web applications. Encodes, tests, debugs and supports new and existing programs. Has knowledge of C++ language programming, XMotif programming interfaces, GUI API packages and other GUI principles. Relies on knowledge and professional discretion to plan and accomplish goals. Usually reports to a project leader or manager. May manage others. Significant ingenuity and flexibility is expected. May require a bachelor’s degree in a related area and at least 5 years of relevant experience.
Interface Design Director - Web
Responsible for directing a team of interface designers in the design and implementation of online interfaces. Leads the design of interface systems, including standards, usability guidelines, design protocols, HTML layouts, GUI prototypes and development procedures. Ensures that interfaces function to achieve desired business goals. Relies on knowledge and professional discretion to plan and accomplish goals. Usually reports to a department head. Manages others. Significant ingenuity and flexibility is expected. May require an advanced degree with at least 5 years of relevant experience.
Interface Designer - Web
Create interfaces for a variety of web-based applications. Designs and evaluates visual human interfaces utilizing user-centric design principles. Works with the product development team to achieve desired user experience. Ensures that interfaces function to achieve desired business goals. Relies on established guidelines and instructions to perform daily job functions. Works under immediate supervision and usually reports to a supervisor. May require an associate’s degree with 0-2 years of relevant experience.
Interface Designer, Sr. - Web
Create interfaces for a variety of web-based applications. Designs and evaluates visual human interfaces utilizing user-centric design principles. Works with the product development team to achieve desired user experience. Ensures that interfaces function to achieve desired business goals. Relies on limited knowledge and professional discretion to plan and accomplish goals. Works under general supervision and usually reports to a supervisor, though some ingenuity and flexibility is required. May require a bachelor’s degree with at least 3 years of relevant experience.
Interface Developer
Designs the visual layout for websites or web-based products with the goal of enhancing appeal to the user while maximizing functionality. Designs graphics, pages, forms and navigation schema. Requires familiarity with HTML and various graphic design software packages. Has knowledge of commonly used concepts, practices and procedures within a particular field. Relies on instructions and pre-established guidelines to perform the functions of the job. Works under immediate supervision. Primary job functions do not typically require exercising independent judgment. Typically reports to a supervisor or manager. May require a bachelor’s degree and 0-2 years of experience in the field or in a related area.
Web Application Developer
Creates, maintains and implements web-based application systems. Resolves issues and recommends enhancements, when necessary. Has knowledge of HTML, Java and related concepts. Relies on knowledge and professional discretion to plan and accomplish goals. Usually reports to a department head. Significant ingenuity and flexibility is expected. May require a bachelor’s degree in a related area and at least 2-4 years of relevant experience.
Web Software Developer
Creates, maintains and implements software packages for websites. Performs troubleshooting and debugging activity. Implements software code. Has knowledge of SQL, C++, HTML, CGI, JavaScript and related concepts. Relies on limited knowledge and professional discretion to plan and accomplish goals. Works under general supervision and usually reports to a project leader or manager, though some ingenuity and flexibility is required. May require a bachelor’s degree in a related area and at least 2 years of relevant experience.
Web Software Developer, Sr.
Counsels internal team members and external customers on the design, development and management of websites. May negotiate with software vendors and other companies. Creates installation programs for websites. Has knowledge of SQL, C++, HTML, CGI, JavaScript and related concepts. Relies on knowledge and professional discretion to plan and accomplish goals. Usually reports to a project leader or manager. May manage others. May require a bachelor’s degree in a related area and 3–5 years of relevant experience.
Webmaster
Manages an organization’s overall web presence. Monitors web traffic and ensures website is prepared to meet traffic demands and performance expectations. Leads the development and design of the website to enhance appearance and usability. Requires a working knowledge of HTML, JavaScript and SQL. Relies on knowledge and professional discretion to plan and accomplish goals. Works under general supervision and usually reports to a supervisor, though some ingenuity and flexibility is required. May require a bachelor’s degree and 2-4 years of experience.




http://www.modis.com/it-insights/infographics/top-it-jobs-of-2016/#

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Certification, Training and Job Placement Assistance https://www.facebook.com/ITASVETERANS/?fref=nf
Published by Robert Wilson\l " · June 29 at 11:41pm · \l "
FACT SHEET: THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE (DOD) CYBER STRATEGY APRIL 2015
An engine of innovation and communication, the Internet connects billions of people, helps deliver goods and services globally, and brings ideas and knowledge to those who would otherwise lack access. The United States relies on the Internet and the systems and data of cyberspace for a wide range of critical services. This reliance leaves us vulnerable in the face of a real and dangerous cyber threat, as state and non-state actors plan to conduct disruptive and destructive cyberattacks on the networks of our critical infrastructure and steal U.S. intellectual property to undercut our technological and military advantage.
The purpose of the new Department of Defense Cyber Strategy, the Department’s second, is to guide the development of DoD's cyber forces and strengthen its cyber defense and cyber deterrence posture. It focuses on building cyber capabilities and organizations for DoD’s three cyber missions: defend DoD networks, systems, and information; defend the United States and its interests against cyberattacks of significant consequence; and provide integrated cyber capabilities to support military operations and contingency plans. The strategy sets five strategic goals and establishes specific objectives for DoD to achieve over the next five years and beyond.
What drove DoD to develop a new cyber strategy? Three major drivers required that DoD develop a new cyber strategy. First is the increasing severity and sophistication of the cyber threat to U.S. interests, to include DoD networks, information, and systems. The Department of Defense has the largest network in the world and DoD must take aggressive steps to defend its networks, secure its data, and mitigate risks to DoD missions. Second, in 2012 President Obama directed DoD to organize and plan to defend the nation against cyberattacks of significant consequence, in concert with other U.S. government agencies. This new mission required new strategic thinking. Finally, in response to the threat, in 2012 DoD began to build a Cyber Mission Force (CMF) to carry out DoD’s cyber missions. The CMF will include nearly 6,200 military, civilian, and contractor support personnel from across the military departments and defense components. The strategy provides clear guidance for the CMF’s development.
Building bridges to the private sector and beyond. To build the force of the future, DoD must attract the best talent, the best ideas, and the best technology to public service. To do so, DoD must build strong bridges to the private sector as well as the research institutions that make the United States such an innovative nation. The private sector and America’s research institutions design and build the networks of cyberspace, provide cybersecurity services, and research and develop advanced capabilities. The Department of Defense has had a strong partnership with the private sector and these research institutions historically, and DoD will strengthen those historic ties to discover and validate new ideas for cybersecurity for DoD and for the country as a whole.
Deterrence is a key part of DoD’s new cyber strategy. This strategy describes the Department of Defense contributions to a broader national set of capabilities to deter adversaries from conducting cyberattacks.
The Department of Defense assumes that the deterrence of cyberattacks on U.S. interests will be achieved through the totality of U.S. actions, including declaratory policy, substantial indications and warning capabilities, defensive posture, effective response procedures, and the overall resiliency of U.S. networks and systems. DoD has a number of specific roles to play in this equation; this strategy describes how DoD will fulfill its deterrence responsibilities effectively.
STRATEGIC GOALS AND KEY IMPLEMENTATION OBJECTIVES:
I. BUILD AND MAINTAIN READY FORCES AND CAPABILITIES TO CONDUCT CYBERSPACE OPERATIONS. In 2013, DoD initiated a major investment in its cyber personnel and technologies for the Cyber Mission Force. The Department of Defense must train its people, build effective organizations and command and control
systems, and fully develop the capabilities that DoD requires to operate in cyberspace. Key objectives of this goal include: • Build technical capabilities for operations, to include a unified and integrated operational platform. • Accelerate research and development to provide DoD with a significant advantage in developing leap-ahead technologies to defend U.S. interests in cyberspace. • Assess CMF capacity to achieve mission objectives when confronted with multiple contingencies.
II. DEFEND THE DOD INFORMATION NETWORK, SECURE DOD DATA, AND MITIGATE RISKS TO DOD MISSIONS. DoD must identify, prioritize, and defend its most important networks and data so that it can carry out its missions effectively. DoD must also plan and exercise to operate within a degraded and disrupted cyber environment in the event that an attack on DoD’s networks and data succeeds, or if aspects of the critical infrastructure on which DoD relies for its operational and contingency plans are disrupted. Key objectives of this goal include: • Build the Joint Information Environment single security architecture to shift the focus from protecting service-specific networks and systems to securing the DoD enterprise. • Implement a capability to mitigate all known vulnerabilities that present a high risk to DoD. • Identify, plan, and defend the networks that support key DoD missions. • Build a layered defense around the Defense Industrial Base through improved accountability, cybersecurity standards, counterintelligence, and whole of government efforts to counter IP theft.
III. BE PREPARED TO DEFEND THE U.S. HOMELAND AND U.S. VITAL INTERESTS FROM DISRUPTIVE OR DESTRUCTIVE CYBERATTACKS OF SIGNIFICANT CONSEQUENCE. The Department of Defense must work with its interagency partners, the private sector, and allied and partner nations to deter and if necessary defeat cyberattacks of significant consequence on the U.S. homeland and U.S. interests. The Department of Defense must develop its intelligence, warning, and operational capabilities to mitigate sophisticated, malicious cyberattacks. Key objectives of this goal include: • Develop intelligence and warning capabilities to anticipate threats. • Partner with key interagency organizations to prepare to defend the nation in cyberspace. • Work with DHS to develop continuous and automated mechanisms for sharing information. • Assess DoD’s cyber deterrence posture and provide recommendations for improving it.
IV. BUILD AND MAINTAIN VIABLE CYBER OPTIONS AND PLAN TO USE THOSE OPTIONS TO CONTROL CONFLICT ESCALATION AND TO SHAPE THE CONFLICT ENVIRONMENT AT ALL STAGES. During heightened tensions or outright hostilities, DoD must be able to provide the President with a wide range of options for managing conflict escalation. As a part of the range of tools available to the United States, DoD must develop viable cyber options and integrate those options into Departmental plans. DoD will develop cyber capabilities to achieve key security objectives with precision, and to minimize loss of life and destruction of property.
V. BUILD AND MAINTAIN ROBUST INTERNATIONAL ALLIANCES AND PARTNERSHIPS TO DETER SHARED THREATS AND INCREASE INTERNATIONAL SECURITY AND STABILITY. All three of DoD’s cyber missions require close collaboration with foreign allies and partners. In its international cyber engagement, DoD seeks to build partnership capacity in cybersecurity and cyber defense. • Partner capacity building will focus on priority regions, to include the Middle East, Asia-Pacific, and Europe. DoD will remain adaptive and flexible to build new alliances and partnerships as required.

CyberPatriot Center of Excellence – San Antonio (CP COE-SA) http://cybercityusa.org/home
Check out the Cyber Patriot video from AFA video on:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jVFe-zUQPac&feature=plcp
Published on Sep 26, 2012
CyberPatriot is the premiere national high school cyber defense competition created to inspire high school students toward careers in cybersecurity or other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines critical to our nation's future. Now in its fifth phase, CyberPatriot V is open to all high schools, Civil Air Patrol Units, JROTC Units, US Naval Sea Cadet Corps Units and accredited home school programs around the country.
Published on Aug 8, 2013
CyberPatriot is the premiere national high school cyber defense competition aimed at inspiring students toward careers in science, technology, engineering, and math. It is open to all high schools, Civil Air Patrol Units, JROTC Units, US Naval Sea Cadet Corps Units and accredited home school programs around the country. Sign up now at http://www.uscyberpatriot.org to join the CyberPatriot VI season beginning Fall 2013 and prove that YOU got what it takes!

Cyber War: U.S. Army Hackers
Published on Apr 16, 2013
Students and staff at the Air Force's Information Operations School at Hurlbert Field, FL explore training for battle on the new front lines of cyberspace. https://youtu.be/kdlXrAZ9K-k


Watch hackers break into the US power grid
https://youtu.be/pL9q2lOZ1Fw
Published on May 11, 2016
A power company in the Midwest hired a group of white hat hackers known as RedTeam Security to test its defenses. We followed them around for 3 days, as they attempted to break into buildings and hack into its network, with the goal of gaining full access. And it was all much easier than you might think. Based on our experiences, it would seem that power companies need to step up their game in the fight against cyber attackers or it could be "lights out."

Produced by Chris Snyder and Paul Szoldra

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As presented at the cybersecurity conference held at Texas A&M University-San Antonio's Brooks City-Base campus in March ‘13, it is estimated that 4.9 million cybersecurity professionals will be needed by 2017 to properly defend global infrastructures from malicious attacks. “We have a problem — we have a demand and supply problem,” said Robin “Montana” Williams, director of the National Cybersecurity Workforce division at the Homeland Security Department. He cited a recent Frost & Sullivan study that estimates governments and companies across the globe will need to hire an additional 1.6 million cybersecurity professionals in the next four years to meet demand — on top of the existing 3.3 million cyber workers. “Even if I took every school in the world and had them (train) every student as a cybersecurity professional ... we still can't get there,” stated Williams. (read more at http://www.mysanantonio.com/default/article/Forum-takes-look-at-cyber-concerns-4390119.php by nhicks@express-news.net)
San Antonio has stepped up to this challenge and is increasingly becoming known as “Cyber City, USA” by leading the way to secure military, commercial and public technology assets and infrastructure in the new century. From major research projects to advanced training and one of the largest populations of trained, experienced professionals in the industry, San Antonio is becoming increasingly important to our nation’s cyber security posture.
One way in which the city and community leaders continue to excel in this endeavor is by working to increase our nation’s cybersecurity assets and trained workforce via the Air Force Association's highly successful CyberPatriot (CP) program. CP is the premiere national high school cyber defense competition created to inspire high school students toward careers in cybersecurity or other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines which are all critical to our nation’s future. San Antonio was been named a CP “Center of Excellence” in 2011 and in 2012 the national championship team from San Antonio’s own INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SECURITY ACADEMY (ITSA) was crowned the national champion of the CP-IV competition consisting of over 800 teams.

Mentor request
San Antonio’s track record is strong and growing; however we desperately need help to meet this critical need for trained cybersecurity professionals

Training Cyber Warriors
What Can Be Learned from Defense Language Training?
by Jennifer J. Li, Lindsay Daugherty
· Related Topics:
· Cyber Warfare,
· Information Security,
· Military Education and Training,
· United States,
· Workforce Management
· Citation

Document Details
· Copyright: RAND Corporation
· Availability: Available
· Print Format: Paperback
· Paperback Pages: 96
· List Price: $22.50
· Paperback Price: $18.00
· Paperback ISBN/EAN: 9780833087287
· Document Number: RR-476-OSD
· Year: 2015
· Series: Research Reports
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· Cyber Warfare
· Information Security
· Military Education and Training
· United States
· Workforce Management

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Conquest in Cyberspace: National Security and Information Warfare

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Research Questions
12. What is the current state of the U.S. cyber defense workforce and training?
13. What aspects of defense language training are viewed as successful, and which areas remain challenging?
14. What key issues should be considered in planning training to expand the U.S. cyber defense workforce?
15. What preliminary lessons can be drawn from U.S. defense language training?

As the importance of cyber operations in national security grows, the U.S. military's ability to ensure a robust cyber workforce becomes increasingly important in protecting the nation. A particular concern has been the growing need for cyber warriors: highly trained and specialized individuals who engage in offensive and defensive operations. The authors seek to help those planning future training for cyber warriors by highlighting what can be learned from another specialty: defense language. While there is no perfect analogy between cyber personnel and another segment of the national security workforce, a number of similarities exist between the need for language skills and cyber warrior expertise, including the need for a highly specialized skill that requires extensive training, the critical role of the skill in mission effectiveness, a need to quickly build capacity, and a potentially limited pipeline of qualified candidates. In this exploratory study, the authors examine what the military services and national security agencies have done to train linguists — personnel with skills in critical languages other than English — and the kinds of language training provided to build and maintain this segment of the workforce. They draw from published documents, research literature, and interviews of experts in both language and cyber. Among key findings, the authors find that shared definitions and metrics are an important first step, training must be closely aligned with mission needs, efforts should focus on building a strong pipeline of candidates, and training must be aligned with overall workforce management efforts.
Key Findings
Language Training Has Had Some Successes
· The field has shared definitions and metrics around which training and workforce management are structured.
· Training has been tailored to a variety of needs and levels.
· Screening tools have been created to identify candidates who are more likely to succeed.
· The range of training options generally meets the diverse needs of many stakeholders.
Language Training Also Continues to Face Challenges
· The pipeline of skilled personnel is limited.
· Training to high levels of proficiency is time consuming.
· Institutions rarely share resources.
· Most university-based language training is regarded as weak or lacking practical orientation.
· Concerns remain about cost and return on investment.
The Authors Identified Preliminary Lessons from Language Training for Cyber Training
· Shared definitions, training standards, and metrics are an important first step in ensuring efficient training and workforce management.
· Close alignment with mission needs is important to effective training.
· Training may benefit from a variety of training providers and delivery methods to enable responsiveness to diverse mission needs and diverse groups of trainees.
· Training individuals from a zero skill level is costly and often inefficient, so building a strong pipeline of candidates may be beneficial.
· Cyber training may benefit from the development of validated screening tools or processes that can be used across the field.
· Alignment between workforce management priorities and training plans is important to ensure a return on the investment.
Table of Contents
· Chapter One
Introduction
· Chapter Two
Understanding Cyber Workforce Needs and Cyber Warrior Training
· Chapter Three
Overview of Defense Language Training, Successes, and Challenges
· Chapter Four
Key Considerations for Developing an Effective and Efficient Training Strategy for Cyber Warriors
· Chapter Five
Preliminary Lessons from Language Training for Cyber Training
Research conducted by
· Forces and Resources Policy Center
· National Defense Research Institute
· RAND National Security Research Division
This research was conducted within the Forces and Resources Policy Center of the RAND National Defense Research Institute, a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Staff, the Unified Combatant Commands, the Navy, the Marine Corps, the defense agencies, and the defense Intelligence Community.
This report is part of the RAND Corporation research report series. RAND reports present research findings and objective analysis that address the challenges facing the public and private sectors. All RAND reports undergo rigorous peer review to ensure high standards for research quality and objectivity.
Permission is given to duplicate this electronic document for personal use only, as long as it is unaltered and complete. Copies may not be duplicated for commercial purposes. Unauthorized posting of RAND PDFs to a non-RAND Web site is prohibited. RAND PDFs are protected under copyright law. For information on reprint and linking permissions, please visit the RAND Permissions page.
The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.

Document Details
· Copyright: RAND Corporation
· Availability: Available
· Print Format: Paperback
· Paperback Pages: 96
· List Price: $22.50
· Paperback Price: $18.00
· Paperback ISBN/EAN: 9780833087287
· Document Number: RR-476-OSD
· Year: 2015
· Series: Research Reports
Explore
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· Cyber Warfare
· Information Security
· Military Education and Training
· United States
· Workforce Management
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Conquest in Cyberspace: National Security and Information Warfare

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Health Information Privacy
Newsletter
Ransomware Hackers Are Coming for Your Health Records
Apr 27, 2016
Cybercriminals may be preying on hospitals because cyber protection measures likely have not kept pace with electronic data collection and because hospitals typically do not have backup systems and databases in place. These kind of attacks can strain health care systems and potentially put patients' lives at risk.


Consumer Attitudes Toward Data Breach Notifications and Loss of Personal Information
by Lillian Ablon, Paul Heaton, Diana Lavery, Sasha Romanosky
· Related Topics:
· Banking Infrastructure Security,
· Cybercrime,
· Health Information Privacy,
· Information Security,
· The Internet,
· Science and Technology Legislation
Data breaches continue to plague private-sector companies, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies. Despite the mounting rate of these breaches, the continuing harms imposed on consumers and firms, and over a decade of breach notification laws, very little research exists that examines consumer response to these developments. This report sets out the results of a nationally representative survey of the consumer experience with data breaches: the frequency of notifications of data breaches and the type of data taken; consumer attitudes toward data breaches, breach notifications, and company follow-on responses; and perceived personal costs resulting from the breach, with the goal to establish a baseline of information about consumer attitudes toward data loss and company practices in responding to such events. Key findings include: (1) Twenty-six percent of respondents, or an estimated 64 million U.S. adults, recalled a breach notification in the past 12 months; (2) 44 percent of those notified were already aware of the breach; (3) 62 percent of respondents accepted offers of free credit monitoring; (4) only 11 percent of respondents stopped dealing with the affected company following a breach; (5) 32 percent of respondents reported no costs of the breach and any inconvenience it garnered, while, among those reporting some cost, the median cost was $500; and (6) 77 percent of respondents were highly satisfied with the company's post-breach response.
Key Findings
Twenty-six percent of respondents, or an estimated 64 million U.S. adults, recalled receiving a breach notification in the 12-month period before the survey.
· Higher-income and better-educated respondents were more likely to remember experiencing a breach; younger adults (ages 18–34) and senior citizens (ages 65+) were less likely.
· More than one-half of those people (51 percent), or an estimated 36 million individuals, received two or more notifications in the year preceding the survey.
Of those who received a notification in their lifetime, 44 percent were already aware of the breach from a source other than the affected company; typically media reports or notifications from a third party.
Sixty-two percent of respondents accepted offers of free credit monitoring.
· According to respondents, three main factors influenced their decision: (1) time and effort required, (2) quality perception and trust (both of the affected company and of the breach notification service), and (3) whether the offer duplicated other services the victim had.
Only 11 percent of respondents stopped dealing with the affected company following a breach.
· Thirty-two percent of respondents reported no costs of the breach and any inconvenience it garnered; among those reporting some cost, the median cost was $500. Median dollar values were higher if health information ($1,000), social security numbers ($1,000), or other financial information ($864) was compromised.
· Just under 6 percent said that the inconvenience cost them $10,000 or more. For these, the breach typically involved credit card or health information.
Seventy-seven percent of respondents were highly satisfied with the company's post-breach response.
· Most respondents (77 percent) were highly satisfied with the company's breach response. The greatest difference was with ethnic minorities, who were less likely to be satisfied with the company's breach response and more likely to both place a higher dollar value on the inconvenience caused by the breach and cease doing business with the company.
Respondents recommended several steps companies could take to better protect their data.
· The steps that would highly satisfy most respondents were (1) take measures to ensure that a similar breach cannot occur in the future (68 percent), (2) offer free credit monitoring or similar services to ensure that lost data is not misused (64 percent), and (3) notify consumers immediately (63 percent). All three of these actions were valued more highly than receiving financial compensation for the inconvenience.
Related Products
\l "\l "
· News Release
News Release
One-Fourth of American Adults Notified of Data Breach in Past Year; Few Consumers Penalize Hacked Companies
Apr 14, 2016
· Infographic
Infographic
Data Theft Victims, and Their Response to Breach Notifications
Apr 14, 2016
Table of Contents
· Chapter One
Introduction
· Chapter Two
Survey Results
· Chapter Three
Conclusions and Implications
· Appendix A
Survey Instrument
· Appendix B
Supporting Tables and Charts
Research Questions
16. How frequently do consumers receive breach notifications and what type of data are typically lost or stolen?
17. What is the typical consumer response toward the notification, the company, and the company's follow-on actions after a breach?
18. What are the perceived personal costs resulting from a breach?
19. How satisfied are consumers with breach notifications?
20. What actions, if any, do consumers take following a breach notification?
21. What is the average rate of customer attrition following a breach notification?


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· http://www.rand.org/pubs/corporate_pubs/CP22-2016-07.htmlhttp://www.rand.org/pubs/corporate_pubs/CP22-2016-07.html
· http://www.rand.org/pubs/corporate_pubs/CP22-2016-07.html
· http://www.rand.org/blog/rand-review/2016/06/the-digital-underworld.htmlhttp://www.rand.org/blog/rand-review/2016/06/the-digital-underworld.html
· http://www.rand.org/blog/rand-review/2016/06/the-digital-underworld.html
· http://www.rand.org/blog/2016/06/rands-lillian-ablon-presents-lessons-from-a-hacker.htmlhttp://www.rand.org/blog/2016/06/rands-lillian-ablon-presents-lessons-from-a-hacker.html
· http://www.rand.org/blog/2016/06/rands-lillian-ablon-presents-lessons-from-a-hacker.html
· http://www.rand.org/multimedia/video/2016/05/02/getting-to-yes-with-china-in-cyberspace.htmlhttp://www.rand.org/multimedia/video/2016/05/02/getting-to-yes-with-china-in-cyberspace.html
· http://www.rand.org/multimedia/video/2016/05/02/getting-to-yes-with-china-in-cyberspace.html

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Keeping pace with the sophistication of cyber-attacks demands that physicians strengthen their capabilities, build resilience and invest in new technologies to support a foundation of digital trust with patients

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