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Microbiology Society
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The Microbiology Society promotes microbiology to audiences including schools, policy-makers and the general public
The Microbiology Society promotes microbiology to audiences including schools, policy-makers and the general public

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Microbiology Society's posts

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Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola is a fungus killing snakes in North America. Now, the disease has been spotted in Britain and continental Europe. Becki Lawson from ZSL's Institute of Zoology tells us more about the international study into the fungus.

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Much of Parliamentary Links Day 2017 focused on Brexit's potential impact on UK science. Society member Dr Karen Robinson told us about her experiences at Parliament.

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We're pleased to introduce our new Council Shadowing Scheme, designed to help members get an insight into the internal workings of the Society.

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Scientists are testing thousands of wild animals around the world for the next potential disease pandemic – we spoke to Simon Anthony and Tracey Goldstein at the USAID PREDICT project about the work they are doing.

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The winner of our 2017 Prize Medal was Professor Michael Rossmann from Purdue University. You can watch his lecture on our blog, with an introduction from Dr David Bhella.

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FIS2017 will be taking place from 30 November–2 December this year at the ICC Birmingham. Register now for early bird rates, and if you are a member of the Society, you can also receive 10% off registration.

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There have been over 260,000 cases of infection in Yemen’s cholera outbreak. Find out more about "the worst cholera outbreak in the world" in our latest blog post.

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Professor Steve Busby was our 2017 Marjory Stephenson Prize Winner. You can now watch his Prize Lecture, given at our Annual Conference this year, on our blog.

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On this month's podcast, we find out from Professor Guy Poppy, Dr Sian Thomas and Professor Alessandro Vespignani about using Twitter to track the spread of disease.

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This is important emphasis on the One Health approach in tackling antimicrobial resistance in people, animals and the environment.
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