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Michael Ray Brown
Works at Story Sense
Attended University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Lives in Santa Monica, California
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Story
Tagline
Writer-producer and founder of Story Sense® screenplay consultancy
Introduction
One of Hollywood’s top script doctors, Michael Ray Brown has more than 30 years’ experience helping writers create successful screenplays.  A story analyst for seven major studios, he contributed to the development of such films as Lethal Weapon, Braveheart, Red Corner, Contact, Hart’s War, and many more.  Since leaving MGM in 1999, he founded Story Sense script analysis, ranked “Highly Recommended” by Creative Screenwriting magazine, and is much in demand by writers, producers, and literary agents.  A working screenwriter and frequent lecturer, Michael discusses script analysis in a popular seminar on screenplay structure.
Education
  • University of Nebraska, Lincoln
    1975
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Work
Occupation
Producer, Screenwriter, Script Consultant
Employment
  • Story Sense
    Screenwriter, Script Consultant, present
  • Workaholic Productions
    Writer
  • Mike Mathis Productions
    Story Producer
  • GRB Entertainment
    Writer
  • Film Garden Entertainment
    Story Editor
  • New Dominion Pictures
    Writer
  • Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures
    Story Analyst
  • Universal Pictures
    Story Analyst
  • Warner Bros. Pictures
    Story Analyst
  • 20th-Century Fox
    Story Analyst
  • Metromedia Producers Corporation
    Story Editor
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Santa Monica, California
Previously
Urbandale, Iowa - Lincoln, Nebraska - London, England

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Michael Ray Brown

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An illuminating discussion of when "on-the-nose" dialogue is just what a script needs, contributed by my friend James Napoli.
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Stephanie Palmer, my former boss from MGM, discusses the value and expectations of script coverage in her blog.  Valuable reading for every screenwriter.
Script coverage services provide script coverage, but they are not all the same. A film executive explains what to avoid when buying script coverage.
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Michael Ray Brown's profile photoHeather Zack's profile photo
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I agree. I do follow the formatting rules, but before I submit I'm probably gonna have to rewrite my work because they won't be getting a white background, they'll get a mauve color background.  Or is there some way I can avert the b.g. white without rewriting?  There's maybe one or two times I've broken one rule, but not a formatting rule.  I was surprised when I wrote and told her about your format, and the way I was taught of how to format.
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Fifteen years after launching my script consultancy service, I decided the website was due for a makeover. Please check out the new, completely redesigned Story Sense site. It's a lot prettier and easier to navigate. Even if you have visited it before, you may find goodies there you missed. http://www.storysense.com
Screenplay consultant and script doctor offering screenplay analysis, script coverage, proofreading, a format guide, and script synopsis services.
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No problem.  I think the site's more easier to read now than it was before, and the guidelines are easier to follow as well. 
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All the thrills of the original, only slightly shorter.
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More than 800 students at Roosevelt Elementary School perform takeoffs of "Uptown Funk" and "Watch Me (Whip / Nae Nae)" in this music video celebrating their love of reading.  Directing and editing the production, I was inspired by their enthusiasm.
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Creative Screenwriting just posted an interview with me, revealing how I broke into the Industry, and covering my popular script Structure Checklist, along with lots of advice for writers.
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Is it possible to clone Final Draft with that?  If not, I might as well just stick with what I've on the new drive.   I'm not sure if it can be done and I don't want to clone old drive if it's going to paste over everything wiping it all clean for the old... at least that's what going to happen with the cloning program my brother has.
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Just wrapped editing the Roosevelt Elementary flash mob video for their annual "Read-a-Thon."  Books in hand, more than 800 kids performed a take-off of Taylor Swift's "Shake It Off."
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Kurt Broderson's profile photoMichael Ray Brown's profile photo
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+Kurt Broderson Thanks for watching, and for your kind words.  We use eight to ten cameras, mostly consumer camcorders like my Canon VIXIA or DSLR's like the Canon EOS 5D, recording 1080p at 29.97 FPS.  All the cameras are owned and operated by parents of Roosevelt students.  We capture two performances back-to-back.  The first one we stay on the periphery, and then go in close on the second performance.  That gives us 16-20 different angles.  I ingest the camera files into Avid Media Composer at low-resolution, group them, and select angles while in multicam mode.  Avid displays nine angles at once, which means I have to switch between two banks of nine to see all the choices.  (I eliminated two angles, due to technical issues.)  The audio on this one was tricky because there were only five singers in the studio, so I mixed in some of the natural sound to make it fuller, and give it more presence.  The choreographer was shouting directions part of the time, so I had to switch back and forth between the two performances to get the cleanest track.  Finally, I ingest the media at full resolution, correct the color (not an easy task with so many different cameras), and then output the finished video as an H.265 MP4 file using Sorenson Squeeze.  The Read-a-Thon is a month-long event at Roosevelt, and the flash mob is only a small part of it.  The kids put in lots of time writing the song, recording it, and rehearsing the dance.  Louis has devoted many hours to organizing it, and Kyrra our choreographer is very generous with her time.  For my part, I just want to capture all their hard work for everyone's enjoyment.
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