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Michael Muller
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So yesterday, though I was very sad to lose one Cornell, I was very happy to gain another.

https://music.amazon.com/albums/B06VSSKQC9?ref=dm_sh_dm_wcp_share_albm_ad_h

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From this past Winter, though I don't think I posted it at the time.
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One of the things I've noticed in conjunction with my own recent practice of alternate-day fasting is that I seem to get sick a lot less, and when I do my symptoms are greatly reduced. This study suggests that this is a common result of the practice.

"Eating less and more than needed on alternate days prolongs life" (2006) http://hn.premii.com/#/article/13825676

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More evidence pointing to the benefits of fasting.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-39070183

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Project Unicorn: a prosthetic arm that shoots glitter #WearableWednesday
https://blog.adafruit.com/2017/02/22/project-unicorn-a-prosthetic-arm-that-shoots-glitter-wearablewednesday/

This might be my favorite 3D printed prosthetic arm I’ve seen yet! Via MAKERS

Eleven-year-old Jordan Reeves has an arm that shoots glitter.

Born with an arm that stops above her elbow — a condition called limb difference that affects around 1,500 babies per year in the U.S. — Reeves became an inventor, creating a selection of cool prosthetics which she revealed to “Shark Tank” investors during Rachel Ray’s daytime show.

“You can never be sad with sparkles,” Reeves said on “Rachel Ray.”

The Columbia, Mo., native has been inventing the device since she was 10 years old, calling her glitter arm shooter, “Project Unicorn.” The device uses compressed air to activate the glitter. She also created a small tool that helps her use a two-handed paper towel dispenser with the help of a 3D printer.

Reeves is aware that her newfound device does draw attention.

“If they are staring, I’ll say ‘Don’t stare, just ask.’ I actually have a shirt that says that,” she said. “I want them to come up and ask me. I want them to know it’s OK. It’s not a bad thing. We all find our own way to do stuff.”

A year ago, Reeves campaigned to get the American Doll company to make a doll with a limb difference so that girls with a limb difference could have dolls that looked like them. The petition has just under 25,000 signatures.

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https://blog.adafruit.com/2017/02/22/project-unicorn-a-prosthetic-arm-that-shoots-glitter-wearablewednesday/
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6-year old and 2-year old are play-fighting:
6-yo: Fire!
2-yo: Fire ona mountain!
(mom and dad applaud)
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