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Michael Maraist
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Michael Maraist

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to put it bluntly
 
What's main difference between 'junior' and 'senior' developer?
Talent hits a target no one else can hit;
Genius hits a target no one else can see.
Arthur Schopenhauer



What's the difference between junior, middle, and senior developers?
There will be as many answers to this question as there are programmers.
But I judge them this way:
   A Junior developer will need near-constant help. Not only will they not know the business domain, but they may also struggle with the fundamentals of the language or the toolset. They don't know what they don't know, so without guidance, they will make frequent mistakes which, if not kept on top of, will derail the wider team.
    A regular Developer has some experience under their belt. They will be independently productive and will be able to tackle most tasks on their own, or understand when they need to reach out for help.
    A Senior Developer has even more experience and will be able to design solutions as well as completing tasks. However, they may need their proposed designs vetted before they start to implement, as they won't necessarily have an overall architectural vision. They will be able to mentor more junior members of the team.
Source:
http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/136163/whats-the-difference-between-junior-middle-and-senior-developers

https://teamtreehouse.com/forum/whats-main-difference-between-junior-and-senior-developer-or-designer-thanks
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Michael Maraist

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This is CSI system-engineer style.
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Now that was obsessive research to track the root of a glitch in the matrix. Job well done by PagerDuty.
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This was a very interesting read.  

If I interpret it correctly, our skin is a pattern recognition engine, just like our eyes and ears and taste-buds.   When something bad happens (e.g. the skin is broken), the surrounding skin does it's best to detect the types of chemicals that were present during the break-in.  If the body eventually goes into reaction mode, the skin 'learns' that the trace chemical is a harbinger of doom.  Thus if the skin ever detects that chemical signature again, it triggers an early warning system that shuts the whole body down (putting it into bacteria-fighting mode, for example).  The problem is that this happens all over the body, not just in the affected area.  The common most troublesome result is the restriction of the breathing passages.  *anaphylactic shock*

The research suggests worms invading our intestines is a common historic problem for humans, and a good use-case for this pattern detection system.

Things like peanut/laxative/pollen/dust/etc allergies, etc imply similar skin-response patterns.. At some point, you are not allergic, then later on in life (possibly still in child-hood) you are.  

A series of bee stings is an unfortunate good example.  many pricks by bees/hornets on different parts of the body.. A very unique chemical signature is detected, along the skin lesion - the body will be ready to globally react next time it detects even the 1st protrusion.

Now, to take a lesson from email spam scanning.  You don't treat an email flagged as spam as forever bad... You augment a probability model.  If you've historically flagged an email as ham then this on email may just be an anomaly.. But if there is a burst of spam, the probability model can swing.  But there is a manual ham button to compensate when the burst is over, swinging the probability back.

The human body should have such a trigger... If the FIRST experience with a chemical is bad.. Then sure, proteins are unique-enough, it may be the scent of a pathogen.   But if you've "been eating peanut butter your whole life", and one day you have a nasty pathogen, and there are traces of peanut butter around the damage point... The body SHOULD be able to quorum vote and tell the mast cell to go F itself.

But since we socially learn that peanut butter MIGHT cause anaphylactic shock, we keep our children away from potentially reactive chemicals.  Thus the first time they do encounter it, may be amidst a pathogen (say an allergy test) or some restaurant food that doesn't settle well with us.

I grew up dirty as a boy could be.  No anti-bacterial. And some other unspeakables.  I'd eat raw uncooked foods when my mother wasn't looking.  I grew up on processed foods; antibiotics, vaccines, what-have-you.  So I should be dying of cancer by this point according to Organic literature.  But I speculate the opposite.  The constant barrage of spam so to speak is training my body that certain chemicals are regularly present when I'm still healthy, and training them that they're also pre-present when I'm sick as a dog.  So my immune system is able to filter out the noise and attach legit pathogens.

I definitely lost some of this correctly targeted immune system when I left college and worked in the big city - using antibacterial soap, not being outside much, etc.   My allergies came out of no-where.  But now that I have "dirty" children surrounding me, I see my immunity getting better.   My throat-and-gum-swelling due to eating an entire carton of peanuts is starting to go lesson (I'm hamming that damn allergy out of existence - so to speak).

So like unwanted email, I believe our allergies are correctable. Helicopter parenting not withstanding.
</speculation>
The idea allergic reactions are bad is ingrained in physician minds—but is that right?
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Michael Maraist

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OSX Yosemite iCal slowdown

Delete cache.. sigh. has nobody heard of DB migration?
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Michael Maraist

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#Linus never fails to make me smile:

"And I have to say that I absolutely despise the BSD people.  They did
sendfile() after both Linux and HP-UX had done it, and they must have
known about both implementations.  And they chose the HP-UX braindamage,
and even brag about the fact that they were stupid and didn't understand
TCP_CORK (they don't say so in those exact words, of course - they just
show that they were stupid and clueless by the things they brag about). 

Oh, well. Not everybody can be as goodlooking as me. It's a curse.

Linus"
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Michael Maraist

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Excel functional programming hurts the brain:
=sumproduct( --(R1:R1000 <= vlookup(I1,F1:F10)), D1:D1000 )

Every character in the above is magic and special cased. This would have been like 20 lines of VBA.  It's kind of like fortran matrix-multiplation based programming.

// what I actually want (imperative programming)
var input = Cell( I1 )
var filterValue = Cell( input )
var accum = 0
for ( Row r in Rows(1,1000) ) {
   if ( r.cell( R ) <= filterValue ) {
       accum += r.cell( D )
  }
}
return accum

// what this actually does
var input = Cell( I1 )
var filterValue = Cell( input )
var accumVector = [ 1, 1, 1, 1, ... ]
for ( Cell c in Cells(R1, R1000) ) {
       var cmp = c <= filterValue
       var cmpM = ( - cmp ) // converts boolean to number
       var cmpMM = ( - cmpM ) // flips sign
       accumVector[i] *= cmpMM;
}

for ( Cell c in Cells(D1,D1000) ) {
       accumVector[i] *= c;
}

var total = 0
for (var a in accumVector) {
   total += a
}
return total
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Michael Maraist

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IRS scam call this afternoon.
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The RNA world hypothesis.

DNA is a double-stranded informational macromolecule that encodes the complete set of instructions (the genome) that are required to assemble, maintain, and reproduce every living organism. (http://goo.gl/Ygwyq8). 

RNA is a single-stranded, multifunctional macromolecule that can twist and fold into more complex shapes than DNA. Hydrogen bonds can form between nucleotides on the same RNA strand, different strands, or even between proteins. This flexibility lets RNA molecules perform a variety of functions, of which the most important is to make proteins. (http://goo.gl/tRc68k

DNA has three primary attributes that allow it to be far better than RNA at encoding genetic information. First, it is normally double-stranded, so that there are a minimum of two copies of the information encoding each gene in every cell. Second, DNA has a much greater stability against breakdown than does RNA. Third, highly sophisticated DNA surveillance and repair systems are present which monitor damage to the DNA and repair the sequence when necessary. Analogous systems have not evolved for repairing damaged RNA molecules.  (goo.gl/Ygwyq8)

The RNA world hypothesis.
In 1968, Francis Crick suggested that the first enzyme might have been made from RNA, and from this idea came the 'RNA world' hypothesis, in which life began with an RNA molecule that gained the ability to self replicate. (http://goo.gl/JD8Nrp)

Many biologists hypothesize that this step led to an "RNA world" in which RNA did many jobs, storing genetic information, copying itself, and performing basic metabolic functions. Today, these jobs are performed by many different sorts of molecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins, mostly), but in the RNA world, RNA did it all. Self-replication opened the door for natural selection. Once a self-replicating molecule formed, some variants of these early replicators would have done a better job of copying themselves than others, producing more "offspring." These super-replicators would have become more common — that is, until one of them was accidentally built in a way that allowed it to be a super-super-replicator — and then, that variant would take over. Through this process of continuous natural selection, small changes in replicating molecules eventually accumulated until a stable, efficient replicating system evolved. (http://goo.gl/P1TdGz)

Replicating molecules became enclosed within a cell membrane. The evolution of a membrane surrounding the genetic material provided two huge advantages: the products of the genetic material could be kept close by and the internal environment of this proto-cell could be different than the external environment. Cell membranes must have been so advantageous that these encased replicators quickly out-competed "naked" replicators. This breakthrough would have given rise to an organism much like a modern bacterium. (http://goo.gl/P1TdGz)

Some cells began to evolve modern metabolic processes and out-competed those with older forms of metabolism. Up until this point, life had probably relied on RNA for most jobs, but everything changed when some cell or group of cells evolved to use different types of molecules for different functions: thanks to its stability, DNA became the genetic material, proteins (which are often more efficient promoters of chemical reactions, or catalysts, than RNA) became responsible for basic metabolic reactions in the cell, and RNA was demoted to the role of messenger, carrying information from the DNA to protein-building centers in the cell. Cells incorporating these innovations would have easily out-competed "old-fashioned" cells with RNA-based metabolisms, hailing the end of the RNA world. (http://goo.gl/P1TdGz)

As early as two billion years ago, some cells stopped going their separate ways after replicating and evolved specialized functions. They gave rise to Earth's first lineage of multicellular organisms. (http://goo.gl/P1TdGz)

How did life originate? Berkeley tutorial, http://goo.gl/P1TdGz
RNA World, Wikipedia, http://goo.gl/BFw8Zy
The chemical structure of DNA (infographic), http://goo.gl/zLnUz0
Larger view: Nature, http://goo.gl/LM8Odl
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Ruby Falls, Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA, photo via www.unmotivating

In 1928, Leo Lambert and a team of excavators found a breathtaking waterfall located over 1,120 feet below the surface of Lookout Mountain in Chattanooga, TN. Lambert named the falls after his wife, Ruby, and opened the area as a public attraction in 1930. Today, Ruby Falls welcomes thousands of visitors each year.

#amazingplacestosee  , #amazingphotosfromaroundtheworld  , #amazingphotography  , #amazingphotos  , #amazingplaces  , #travel  , #travelaroundtheworld  , #traveldestinations  , #aesholding  , #bucketlist  , #bucketlistideas  , #bucketlisttravel   #bucketlistdestinations  , #wonderfulworld  , #beautifulworld  , #amazingworld  , #nature  , #naturephotography  , #waterfall  , #waterfallphotography  , #photography  , #landscape  , #landscapephoto  , #theworldofphotography  , #topphotosong+  , #beautifulpictures  , #beautifulplanetearth  , #beautifulplaces  , #beautifulnature  , #nationalgeographiceducation  , #placestoseebeforeyoudie  , #flowersandnature  , #50mmphotography  , #earth  
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Pretty cool animated gif. Js versions are nicer, but this is a lot of info.
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Why learn when you can explore?
Introduction
conversationalist, technofile, politician, eager to please, function over form (to a fault), post-modern geek, dad-in-chief, if it's got bits I'll byte. linux-or-die, laughter-is-the-best... everything.
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