Profile

Cover photo
Michael LaTorra
Works at New Mexico State University
Attended New College, FL
738 followers|55,439 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideosReviews

Stream

Michael LaTorra

Shared publicly  - 
 
First step would be a science of consciousness. Second step then is engineering of computer consciousness.
 
A science of consciousness? Qualia Computing (Andres Gomez Emilsson) reports from Tucson 2016:
https://qualiacomputing.com/
Revealing the computational properties of consciousness
1 comment on original post
1
Michael LaTorra's profile photo
 
David Pearce writes:
The abstract of my talk is here ("extremely implausible" - David Chalmers):
http://www.physicalism.com/abstract.html
("Schrödinger’s Neurons")
A follow-up from my last visit (2010):
http://www.hedweb.com/philsoph/quantum-computer.html
("Quantum computing: the first 540 million years")

David Chalmers doesn't balk at considering panpsychism or even the possibility that experience discloses the intrinsic nature of the physical, i.e. non-materialist physicalism. Rather, Chalmers believes that what he (perhaps unwisely) calls "constitutive Russellian monism" cannot solve the phenomenal binding/combination problem. (cf. http://consc.net/papers/combination.pdf)
In my view, Chalmers is right to recognise that phenomenal binding is classically impossible. Where Chalmers is too quick (IMO) is in accepting the consensus wisdom that sub-femtosecond decoherence times of individual neuronal superpositions in the CNS are a reductio ad absurdum of quantum mind rather than an experimentally falsifiable prediction. (Tegmark’s paper is most commonly cited: http://hedweb.com/physicalism/quantum-computer.pdf) Yes, intuitively such superpositions (if they exist, as wavefunction monism dictates) are just "noise": no chance of a perfect structural match between phenomenology and physics here. Thermally-decoherence in the CNS is indeed insanely rapid. But before surrendering to dualism, let’s do the (fiendishly technically demanding) interferometry experiments to rule out the possibility that our folk chronology of mind is mistaken.

Stuart Hameroff was presiding at Tucson too. Although most people associate Hameroff's ideas with quantum mind, it’s fair to say Orch-OR is really a semi-classical approach involving a “dynamical collapse” story. No deviation from the unitary Schrödinger dynamics has ever been experimentally detected.
http://arxiv.org/pdf/0909.1469v3.pdf
Add a comment...

Michael LaTorra

Shared publicly  - 
 
The new creators on Google+ Create.
 
Introducing Google+ Create

Today we are launching Google+ Create (g.co/PlusCreate), a unique program that gives amazing content creators the recognition and audience they deserve.

When we introduced Google+ Collections last May, we were blown away by the amazing things people began sharing, from the beautiful (goo.gl/ryi0jv) to the breathtaking (goo.gl/n0KpR6), from the profound (goo.gl/XfBB0y) to the playful (goo.gl/zdDVsf), from the whimsical (goo.gl/zLOMgy) to the wonderfully eclectic (goo.gl/kgtI38).

And people on Google+ agree. Since launching the redesigned Google+ in November, Collection follows have more than doubled.

But these Collections don’t create themselves. Behind them are fascinating individuals who bring their flair, imagination and craft to engage and inspire others. There are food alchemists like +maria nasir in Lahore, Pakistan, writers and woodturners like +Ellie Kennard and +Steven Kennard in Nova Scotia, and daredevil acrobats like +Randy T on a mountain top near you.

We want to celebrate these inspiring creators and amplify their unique voices. Google+ Create members get a verified profile, early access to new product features, a private channel with the Google+ team, and special opportunities to build their audiences.

Visit g.co/PlusCreate to meet some of our members, learn about the benefits, and apply to join if you’re interested. Or just immerse yourself in the diversity of Collections already on Google+ (g.co/Collections).
194 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Michael LaTorra

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Michael LaTorra

Shared publicly  - 
 
Seven-of-Nine has your number.
 
represent.com/jeri
Hey gang, it’s finally here! My first ever official charity tee. Proceeds from every shirt sold benefit the amazing work of St Jude Children’s Hospital. Available for 2 weeks only and then gone forever! You know you want one ;-) Get yours here: represent.com/jeri
117 comments on original post
1
1
Add a comment...

Michael LaTorra

Shared publicly  - 
 
Making phone calls inside Google Hangouts is easier now.
 
Faster phone calls in Google Hangouts

Calling from desktop just got better. We're excited to announce: 

* Faster call connections right inside of Gmail and Inbox
* Quicker call answering for incoming Google Voice calls

Start a phone call by clicking the phone tab in Gmail, or by searching for a phone number in Hangouts. You can also try this in the Hangouts Chrome App: http://goo.gl/FujGNb

Look for these updates as we roll them out over the next few days!

#hangouts  
58 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Michael LaTorra

Shared publicly  - 
 
My favorite director. This examination looks at how Kurosawa constructs his scenes. Unlike most directors, Kurosawa also edited his films himself. It shows.
5
Add a comment...
In his circles
424 people
Have him in circles
738 people
Linda Dano's profile photo
John Smith's profile photo
Nicole Tin's profile photo
Gabriel So's profile photo
Pinay Ramblings's profile photo
Bobby Byrd's profile photo
Amara D. Angelica's profile photo
Maria Kareliusson's profile photo
Ted Coplan's profile photo

Michael LaTorra

Shared publicly  - 
1
1
Add a comment...

Michael LaTorra

Shared publicly  - 
 
When the replicator's down...
 
William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy having lunch on the set of Star Trek.
16 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Michael LaTorra

Shared publicly  - 
 
How bad is the potential threat of massively targered cybercrime for the average person? Probably a lot worse than you think, argues Cory Doctorow.
 
Cory Doctorow:

In the USA, virtually every merchant I deal with wants to make a copy of my ID. Not one of them has ever been able to show me their data-handling practices. My daughter's martial art studio wanted a copy of my fingerprints to sign her up for after-school classes. Social Security Numbers are used as identifiers and authentication tokens by phone companies and banks, and can be trivially derived from public data sources. The public school system wants to give your home address to private contractors and the US military. You can't open an account with a public utility or a private mailbox without handing over copies of your ID and your home address.

Most services you authenticate to want to use a "security question" for password recovery. These security questions -- date of birth, mother's maiden name, etc -- are matters of public record and things you can't change when they breach.

All of this is retained indefinitely and secured indifferently. What's more, a savvy fraudster can build from one or two pieces of this information into a takeover of some of your accounts. Once they're inside your phone, they can use that to leverage a takeover of something harder, like your utilities. From there, they can get the paper statements used to interact with the government or the banks.

Schools are another locus of this. When I do author visits, the schools routinely require scans of my identification, and never, ever, ever know what their data-handling practice is. I feel like a dick making a big deal out of this, but I do it anyway, because when you do get the school board's CTO on the phone, find out who the supplier is who stores those scans, and discover what their privacy policy and data-handling practices are, the inevitable outcome is, "We store everything forever, and badly. You indemnify us for all losses arising from our negligence. We can sell this data. We can show it to anyone we want to."

Migrants get all of this and more. We have to deal with private government contractors who routinely require us to transmit all this information, along with things like copies of our passports, long-form birth certificates, biometric identifiers, all using low-to-no-security methods, for retention by yet more third parties whose own data-handling practices are no better than anyone else's, which is to say, fucking awful.

Everyone knows that these procedures are terrible, and no one gives a shit. It's above everyone's paygrade. The major risk analysis undertaken by firms isn't "Will we destroy someone's life?" It's "Are we indemnified or insured?" The UK story is telling: a woman rented her income property to a tenant who then listed it for sale with a fat-commission-taking real estate broker called Foxtons, who stand out in a field known for sleaze and misery as particularly terrible. Foxtons let this person sell someone else's house without any checking even though the sale was so dodgy its badness could be seen from orbit.

There is structural, society-level, existential risk in this calculus, and I think it's probably worse than the risks that led up to the 2007 crash. We are approaching an era of automatable, mass-scale attacks of the sort presently used to gain access to things like your online dating profiles or home security cameras, except these ones will piece together multiple forms of compromise and direct them to automated attacks on your whole bank balance, your home, and your retirement funds.

If you're thinking about getting into a life of crime, you should definitely become an identity thief and steal houses. It has never been easier, and it will get easier still, every day, for the foreseeable future.

http://boingboing.net/2015/12/14/cybercrime-3-0-stealing-whole.html#more-439824
Articles in the UK and US press describe fraudsters who used public document registries to steal entire houses, using forged documents to list the houses for sale, transferring title to them, and d...
8 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Michael LaTorra

Shared publicly  - 
 
Dungeons & Dragons & Philosophers.
And that was the day that Utilitarians, Objectivists, Communists, and Egoists all united as one: to kill Nietzsche. And also they told him that their group was really hardcore and didn't allow re-rolling characters, so once you died you had to wait outside and not talk. Didn't get the joke?
1
7
Add a comment...

Michael LaTorra

Shared publicly  - 
 
Enjoyed having lunch and discussing a tiny fraction of the universe of subjects that David Brin can discuss with erudition and discernment.
3
Christy Johnson's profile photo
 
Awwwww, great pic +Michael LaTorra 
Add a comment...
People
In his circles
424 people
Have him in circles
738 people
Linda Dano's profile photo
John Smith's profile photo
Nicole Tin's profile photo
Gabriel So's profile photo
Pinay Ramblings's profile photo
Bobby Byrd's profile photo
Amara D. Angelica's profile photo
Maria Kareliusson's profile photo
Ted Coplan's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Retired Assoc. Professor of English
Employment
  • New Mexico State University
    Asst. Professor of English, present
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Zen Transhumanist
Introduction

Devotee of Adi Da Samraj, Transhumanist, Zen Buddhist, teacher, author.

Awakening is the most important thing.

Bragging rights
I bought Scotty of STAR TREK (actor James Doohan) a drink!
Education
  • New College, FL
  • New Mexico State University
  • Stony Brook University, NY
  • Antioch College, OH
Links
This is my go-to Starbucks in Las Cruces. It's convenient to home, to shopping (for groceries and the local enclosed mall), and to a movie theater (10 screens). I go there a lot, so they know me. It's my "third place" between work and home -- the place where they know my name.
Public - 9 months ago
reviewed 9 months ago
1 review
Map
Map
Map