Profile

Cover photo
Michael Kerrisk
252,762 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideosReviews

Stream

Michael Kerrisk

Shared publicly  - 
 
Linux 4.9 includes new features that allow introspecting of user namespace relationships. Here's a brief description, along with a small Golang program that illustrates their use in order to show the complete user namespace hierarchy on a system.
9
7
Jim Davis's profile photo
 
Interesting article, though "introspecting" is still jarring.
Add a comment...

Michael Kerrisk

Shared publicly  - 
 
Anyone who spent time around me in the 2000s will have an idea of what the picture below is about. As I wrote newer chapters TLPI, I constantly reread chapters that I'd already written, red pen in hand. For years, I'd always ...
29
1
Henrik Austad's profile photoSteve Johnson's profile photo
2 comments
 
OMG
Add a comment...

Michael Kerrisk

Shared publicly  - 
8
Michael Kerrisk's profile photoKam-Yung Soh's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Michael Kerrisk
Thanks for the explanation.
Add a comment...

Michael Kerrisk

Shared publicly  - 
 
Good summary article on how Europe:Greece got to the current point...
1
Add a comment...

Michael Kerrisk

Shared publicly  - 
 
I've scheduled another public "Linux/UNIX System Programming" course in Munich, Germany for 14-18 September 2015. (I'm also available to give on-demand tailored versions of the course onsite at customer premises, in Europe, the US, and further afield.)
            
The 5-day course is intended for programmers developing system-level, embedded, or network applications for Linux and UNIX systems, or programmers porting such applications from other operating systems (e.g., Windows) to Linux or UNIX. The course is based on my book, The Linux Programming Interface (TLPI) (http://man7.org/tlpi/ ), and covers topics such as low-level file I/O; signals and timers; creating processes and executing programs; POSIX threads programming; interprocess communication (pipes, FIFOs, message  queues, semaphores, shared memory),  and network programming (sockets).

The course has a lecture+lab format, and devotes substantial time to working on some carefully chosen programming exercises that put the "theory" into practice. Course participants receive printed and electronic copies of TLPI, along with a 600-page course book containing example code, exercises, and the more than 1000 slides that are used in the course. A reading knowledge of C is assumed; no previous system programming experience is needed.

Full details about the course are at http://man7.org/training/sys_prog/ . A list of course topics is at http://man7.org/training/sys_prog/sys_prog_course_outline.html .
Information about the trainer (i.e., me) is at
http://man7.org/training/reasons_to_choose_man7.html . A 2-page PDF containing the essential information about the course can be found at http://man7.org/training/sys_prog/man7.org_training_M7D-SP01.pdf .
                                                    
Questions about the course? Email training@man7.org
The Linux Programming Interface (published in October 2010, No Starch Press, ISBN 978-1-59327-220-3) is a detailed guide and reference for Linux and UNIX system programming. With 1552 pages, 115 diagrams, 88 tables, nearly 200 example programs, and over 200 exercises, TLPI is the most ...
8
3
Add a comment...

Michael Kerrisk

Shared publicly  - 
 
I've released man-pages-4.09; 550 commits, 8 new pages, and significant updates to many other pages;
http://linux-man-pages.blogspot.com/2016/12/man-pages-409-is-released.html
7
2
Add a comment...

Michael Kerrisk

Shared publicly  - 
10
Sergey Senozhatsky's profile photoSteve Johnson's profile photo
2 comments
 
Go you good thing....well done Michael 
Add a comment...

Michael Kerrisk

Shared publicly  - 
9
1
Add a comment...

Michael Kerrisk

Shared publicly  - 
 
I've long thought the key reason that Linux beat the BSDs was the license. Linus Torvalds seems to think so also.
"Over the years, I've become convinced that the BSD license is great for code you don't care about," said Linus Torvalds.
4
Trevor Woerner's profile photoNeil Brown's profile photo
2 comments
 
I believe Linus chose the license because it codified the so-called "golden rule" which is widely seen as a valuable ethic.  So I think he did choose it because he thought it would "work".
"defining factor" is certainly hyperbole - there are multiple factors, such as those you list, which were all necessary.  However I think GPLv2 can be seen as an important factor in the transition from "successful hobbyist project" to "successful commercial project" because it provided the legal framework for corporations to work together in the same way that hobbyists already did.
So it possibly is justified to claim that the GPLv2 was a defining factor in the "commercial" success of Linux.  Then there could be a separate discussion on whether the commercial success was necessary for the project to be "successful" in some absolute sense.
Add a comment...

Michael Kerrisk

Shared publicly  - 
 
The mass media presentation of Greece:Europe is distorted....
1
Add a comment...
Story
Introduction
I'm a New Zealander, living in Munich, Germany. I've contributed to the Linux man-pages project since 2000, and been the maintainer since 2004. My book, The Linux Programming Interface (ordering info), published in 2010 by No Starch Press, is a detailed description of the Linux kernel-userspace and glibc APIs.
Links
Other profiles
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Really competent, friendly service. (Thanks, Brad!) Good repair job on my cracked OnePlus One screen. They even kindly threw in a quick open and check on an old Nexus 4 of mine whose touchscreen had stopped working; it fixed the problem!
Public - in the last week
reviewed in the last week
Excellent pizza. Decent prices. Wonderful staff. I'll be back!
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Excellent! Three times now, I have got ~30 * 300 page spiral-bound training books printed here. Faultless work, with a quick turnaround, and careful, patient, and friendly service. And to boot, the prices are very decent.
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
5 reviews
Map
Map
Map
On the plus side: the location is quite handy and relatively free of street noise, and the staff are friendly and helpful. On the downside: the (single) rooms are TINY (and at 99 € in high season, rather overpriced), and the walls are very thin, so that my sleep was disturbed on a couple of occasions by goings on in the next room. On two or three mornings, there was no hot water to be had. And on my second stay, I arrived to find that they had lost my reservation during a heavily booked period, causing some anxiety about where I'd be staying. (Eventually, they solved the problem.) Also, the breakfast @ 13 euro is not great value: a somewhat meagre selection.
• • •
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
A superb place to stop with the family for a few days. We've stayed here many times while transiting through Bangkok. Great buffet, nice swimming pool, and very peaceful (for Bangkok) location.
Quality: ExcellentFacilities: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago