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Michael Goh
442 followers -
Landscape/astrophotographer in Western Australia
Landscape/astrophotographer in Western Australia

442 followers
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Astrophotography trip report – Lake Brown September 2016 I went for a trip to Lake Brown again – north of Merredin in Western Australia.  I assumed that there would be water in the lake.  After carefully considering weather conditions across multiple…

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Trip to the VLT

Last year, I received a great honour with winning the Nightscape category of the Photo Nightscape Awards – the prize being a trip to ESO’s VLT in Chile.  I managed to organise the time at the beginning of July to go between work and personal commitments…

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What does the milky way look like - what's with the colour and the archway?

What does the milky way look like? – or – does it really look like that? I think these are some of the more common questions I get.  Apart from “what settings?”  I think to break the answers into two categories. What does it look like? Is/why is it a…

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The Edge of Madness

Trip report for recent astrophotography expedition to Lake Dumbleyung in Western Australia. While it’s easy to plan for the milky way positioning in respect to the landscape and other celestial objects, other local conditions and weather conditions remain…

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Ever since I posted “Distant lands” – how I’ve done the lighting remains a regular question that I’m asked – How I take an astrophotography self portrait? The issue is around getting consistent lighting for a self portrait across a panorama with…

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Thanks apod :)
Milky Way over the Pinnacles in Australia
Image Credit: Michael Goh
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap160217.html

What strange world is this? Earth. In the foreground of the featured image are the Pinnacles, unusual rock spires in Nambung National Park in Western Australia. Made of ancient sea shells (limestone), how these human-sized picturesque spires formed remains unknown. In the background, just past the end of the central Pinnacle, is a bright crescent Moon. The eerie glow around the Moon is mostly zodiacal light, sunlight reflected by dust grains orbiting between the planets in the Solar System. Arching across the top is the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy. Many famous stars and nebula are also visible in the background night sky. The featured 29-panel panorama was taken and composed last September after detailed planning that involved the Moon, the rock spires, and their corresponding shadows. Even so, the strong zodiacal light was a pleasant surprise.
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experimenting with different panorama software programs 
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