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Michael Deis
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Michael Deis

Geopolitics  - 
 
An exceptional essay underlining the notion that geopolitical analysis is not deterministic.
The world of quantum physics can provide useful guidance in the forecasting of global events.
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Michael Deis

Cyber & Space  - 
 
National Security Issues Raised by Hillary Clinton's Personal E-Mail Server

This report by MSNBC provides a thorough timeline of Secretary Clinton's statements regarding the use of her personal e-mail server for government business.  At the end of the report, Bloomberg's Mark Halperin provides an excellent summation of why Secretary Clinton's anomolous behavior matters broadly and to national security.  Excellent reporting by MSNBC.

#markhalperin    #hillaryclinton   +Morning Joe 
Joe Scarborough discusses reports that classified information may have been compromised due to Hillary Clinton's personal email use.
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Caroline Brown's profile photoRetribution Tactical 13:4 Discount Gear's profile photoDave Anderson's profile photoShawn Moody's profile photo
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How can someone who cannot handle classified information legally be qualified to run this country? 
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Michael Deis

Discussion  - 
 
Uber Gets Political:  Obama campaign veteran David Plouffe takes on New York's Progressive Mayor with a free market message.

#uber   #newyork   #capitalism  

http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/former-obama-adviser-david-plouffe-on-ubers-vision-and-critics/
The on-demand car app is taking to the airwaves in New York with a blunt message aimed at Mayor Bill de Blasio and the city's taxis. But that is just one front in the company’s worldwide fight to grow even bigger. Uber’s chief adviser and board member David Plouffe used to serve as President Obama’s campaign manager in 2008 before becoming a White House adviser. Plouffe joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss Uber's explosive growth and legal fights.
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Michael Deis

Discussion  - 
 
Fascinating  New solar model predicts mini ice age by 2030 
There will be a "mini ice age" in 2030, solar scientists have said.
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Michael Deis

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Grexit: European Elites Confront their Sovereign Obligations

Legitimate, constitutional government must satisfy three obligations: peace, justice, and defense. The negotiation over Greece’s status in the Eurozone has failed, thus far, to ensure Europe’s tranquility. Thus, Grexit calls into question the capacity of European political elites and technocrats to meet their sovereign responsibilities.

The disconnection between Europe’s ruling classes and Eurocrats, on the one side, and the average European, on the other side, has been building since at least the 2005 rejection of a European Constitution by French and Dutch voters and its consequent abandonment. Europe’s political elites nevertheless proceeded with their vision of a “United States of Europe” and in 2007 signed the Treaty of Lisbon that adopted many of the changes to the EU that had originally been incorporated into the European Constitution.

The rise of Euroskeptical parties across Europe is the most recent expression of popular discontent with the path European elites have pursued. These parties reflect not merely the poor economic performance of the EU, but manifest the disconnection between establishment parties and voters. Pan-Europeanism is giving way to national predispositions as citizens cast their ballots against pro-Europe parties in both national and European elections.

It is no doubt difficult to empathize with the average citizen when one sits in Brussels as a civil servant or in Berlin, Paris, or Brussels as a politician with every prospect of continued employment and regular salary rises. Europeans who suffer the daily marginalization associated with unemployment or the loss of hope as their businesses close and their life savings disappear are abstract statistics. Their plight is not personally felt. Government is far removed.

This is a distinguishing feature of the modern administrative state. Those who rule and regulate are separate from those who are ruled. But unlike the medieval king who was required to make justice for all, the bureaucratic impetus is to regulate what one can and overlook what one cannot. Political elites have forgotten that the preservation of unity, a foundation stone of peace, requires equity and justice. Peace (domestic tranquility) and justice go hand in hand. They are inseparable.

The consequences of the negotiations surrounding Greece's continued membership in the Eurozone are a profound affront to equity and justice both for Greece, a sovereign nation, and for the European Union. They lay bare the incapacity of the Greek government to meet the minimum requirements of the sovereign. Domestic peace and tranquility are not apparent when queuing up for one’s daily Euro ration or for the pharmaceuticals a loved one needs to manage their health. Nor is it visible in the kick the can down the road philosophy of European politicians that Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis has labeled “extend and pretend”. From the perspective of Europe, there is no equity in extending bailouts to historically profligate governments.

Financial Times reporting indicates that Greek savers may have as much as 30 percent of their savings over 8,000 Euro confiscated by banks in the coming days. CNN suggests that Greeks may lose one out of every two Euros in their bank accounts. Financiers and bankers euphemistically call this a “haircut”.

These policies are reminiscent of the sort adopted during the period of German hyperinflation when, in 1923, the Rentenmark was introduced, or after World War II when, in 1948, the Deutsche Mark was adopted. These extraordinary measures were born of extreme circumstances and the necessity of the sovereign to realize economic and social stability.

Those who will suffer as extreme economic measures are adopted are not Europe’s political elites or bureaucrats, or, even, Greece’s political class. Rather, it is the man on the street. The crisis of governance, expressed in the widening gap between those who rule and those who are ruled, is likely to be exacerbated in the coming weeks. The question arises will social disorder be the result. Or, will European elites reinvigorate the social compact? In either case, the European experiment is about to suffer a test it has not previously encountered. 

Governments can only legitimately rule with the consent of the governed. The potential Grexit requires that European elites confront the questions of who are the governed, to what have they assented, and how is justice to be done.
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Grexit: European Elites Confront their Sovereign Obligations

Legitimate, constitutional government must satisfy three obligations: peace, justice, and defense. The negotiation over Greece’s status in the Eurozone has failed, thus far, to ensure Europe’s tranquility. Thus, Grexit calls into question the capacity of European political elites and technocrats to meet their sovereign responsibilities.

The disconnection between Europe’s ruling classes and Eurocrats, on the one side, and the average European, on the other side, has been building since at least the 2005 rejection of a European Constitution by French and Dutch voters and its consequent abandonment. Europe’s political elites nevertheless proceeded with their vision of a “United States of Europe” and in 2007 signed the Treaty of Lisbon that adopted many of the changes to the EU that had originally been incorporated into the European Constitution.

The rise of Euroskeptical parties across Europe is the most recent expression of popular discontent with the path European elites have pursued. These parties reflect not merely the poor economic performance of the EU, but manifest the disconnection between establishment parties and voters. Pan-Europeanism is giving way to national predispositions as citizens cast their ballots against pro-Europe parties in both national and European elections.

It is no doubt difficult to empathize with the average citizen when one sits in Brussels as a civil servant or in Berlin, Paris, or Brussels as a politician with every prospect of continued employment and regular salary rises. Europeans who suffer the daily marginalization associated with unemployment or the loss of hope as their businesses close and their life savings disappear are abstract statistics. Their plight is not personally felt. Government is far removed.

This is a distinguishing feature of the modern administrative state. Those who rule and regulate are separate from those who are ruled. But unlike the medieval king who was required to make justice for all, the bureaucratic impetus is to regulate what one can and overlook what one cannot. Political elites have forgotten that the preservation of unity, a foundation stone of peace, requires equity and justice. Peace (domestic tranquility) and justice go hand in hand. They are inseparable.

The consequences of the negotiations surrounding Greece's continued membership in the Eurozone are a profound affront to equity and justice both for Greece, a sovereign nation, and for the European Union. They lay bare the incapacity of the Greek government to meet the minimum requirements of the sovereign. Domestic peace and tranquility are not apparent when queuing up for one’s daily Euro ration or for the pharmaceuticals a loved one needs to manage their health. Nor is it visible in the kick the can down the road philosophy of European politicians that Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis has labeled “extend and pretend”. From the perspective of Europe, there is no equity in extending bailouts to historically profligate governments.

Financial Times reporting indicates that Greek savers may have as much as 30 percent of their savings over 8,000 Euro confiscated by banks in the coming days. CNN suggests that Greeks may lose one out of every two Euros in their bank accounts. Financiers and bankers euphemistically call this a “haircut”.

These policies are reminiscent of the sort adopted during the period of German hyperinflation when, in 1923, the Rentenmark was introduced, or after World War II when, in 1948, the Deutsche Mark was adopted. These extraordinary measures were born of extreme circumstances and the necessity of the sovereign to realize economic and social stability.

Those who will suffer as extreme economic measures are adopted are not Europe’s political elites or bureaucrats, or, even, Greece’s political class. Rather, it is the man on the street. The crisis of governance, expressed in the widening gap between those who rule and those who are ruled, is likely to be exacerbated in the coming weeks. The question arises will social disorder be the result. Or, will European elites reinvigorate the social compact? In either case, the European experiment is about to suffer a test it has not previously encountered. 

Governments can only legitimately rule with the consent of the governed. The potential Grexit requires that European elites confront the questions of who are the governed, to what have they assented, and how is justice to be done.

#grexit   #eu   #eurozone  
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Michael Deis

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"Impulse Drive" actually works, but scientists don't know why.
The British designed EM Drive actually works and would dramatically speed up space travel, scientists have confirmed
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Michael Deis

Discussion  - 
 
Details of this reporting are interesting 
The Carnegie Moscow Center used to be a hub of Russian liberalism. Now it stands accused of being a ‘trojan horse’ for Russian influence.
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Michael Deis

Discussion  - 
 
Myths about the "sharing economy" and the US workforce

Listening to TNT, one might think that companies like Uber and AirBnB have fundamentally changed America's workforce.  These charts present a different perspective based on empirical data.  

#sharingeconomy   #workforce  
Hillary Clinton and Robert Reich say the "rise of contracting" is a threat to workers. But is the premise even true?
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Michael Deis

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I, Pencil: My Family Tree:  A basic lesson in economics and cooperation

According to Milton Friedman, “I know of no other piece of literature that so succinctly, persuasively, and effectively illustrates the meaning of both Adam Smith’s invisible hand—the possibility of cooperation without coercion—and Friedrich Hayek’s emphasis on the importance of dispersed knowledge and the role of the price system in communicating information that will make the individuals do the desirable things without anyone having to tell them what to do.”

#ipencil   #economics   #hayek   #invisiblehand  
A Project of the Competitive Enterprise Institute
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Michael Deis

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The importance of "the rule of law" and "equality before the law" in binding societies together.
Greece's crisis reminds the United States that great civilizations usually decline because of increasing lawlessness and corruption.
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Michael Deis

Discussion  - 
 
Understanding the Issues of Backdoors to Encryption
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Let's not forget also, that some Countries convinced RIM (BlackBerry) to give it's keys away.

#Notobackdoors
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25 years of international public opinion research experience
Introduction
founder of Primer Research (formerly PRiMeR, Ltd.) - specialized in opinion, social and audience research on a global basis since 1994.  
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lifetime member of WAPOR, ESOMAR member
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Public Opinion & Marketing Research