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Michael Atkinson
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Mulu, Borneo

Gunung Mulu National Park boasts the world’s largest cave system, and, as less than 10% of the world’s caves have been explored, it’s an area ripe for discovery. When compared to some of the more remote locations on this list, Mulu is relatively easy to reach: you have the option of traveling by airplanes that depart daily, slowly by boating up the river, or dangerously by foot. Despite this accessibility, once you reach Mulu, there’s plenty of exploration to be done, since most of the park’s caves and jungles remain undiscovered.
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Welcome to the future!: Significant progress in the use of 3D printing technology for the creation of organs and body parts

"QUT biofabrication team has made a major breakthrough by 3D printing mechanically reinforced, tissue engineered constructs for the regeneration of body parts.

In an article published in Nature Communications, the biomedical engineers outlined how they had reinforced soft hydrogels via a 3D printed scaffold.

Professor Dietmar W. Hutmacher, from QUT's Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, said nature often used fibre reinforcement to turn weak structures into outstanding mechanically robust ones.

"Such is the case with articular cartilage tissue, which is formed by stiff and strong collagen fibres intertwined within a very weak gel matrix of proteoglycans," Professor Hutmacher said."

Read more: http://phys.org/news/2015-04-breakthrough-d-body.html

The study: "Reinforcement of hydrogels using three-dimensionally printed microfibres." Nature Communications 6, Article number: 6933
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/150428/ncomms7933/full/ncomms7933.html

Image:  Cornell researchers create child's ear | courtesy: Cornell University
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I love this
The University of Southern California is planning to establish a new chair in LDS Studies. It will be named after Elder John A. Widtsoe.

Yesterday I had the privilege to be the keynote speaker at the first symposium (the full talk will be made available on LDS.org at a later date). I based my address on thoughts Harriet and I had during our recent visit to the Auschwitz concentration camp.

As we walked through Auschwitz, on the same paths that so many others marched along decades ago, I wondered how anyone could be so heartless to have done something so incomprehensible.
As I pondered this, three distinct insights entered my heart and mind:

First, humans are prone to dislike or hate those we do not really know. This is our human nature. But the more we get to know those who are different from us, the more we learn that perhaps they are not so different from us after all.

Second, we must speak up. We all have a responsibility to speak the truth. To stand for what is right. To lift up our voices in support of that which is good.

Third, divine love is always the answer. If we each learned to genuinely love God and to love our fellowmen as our brothers and sisters, we would have more compassion and the problems of the world could be more easily solved.

It is my hope that we will look past our differences and, instead, see each other with eyes that recognize who we truly are—fellow travelers, brothers and sisters, pilgrims walking the same path that leads to becoming more enlightened and more refined as our Father in Heaven intends us to become.
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2015-04-27
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2015-04-13
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What Comets, Parking Lots and Charcoal Have in Common

All the pictures we’ve seen of Rosetta’s target comet 67P/C-G show it reflecting brightly against the background of outer space. And well they should. Space is black as night.

But if we were to see the comet against a more familiar earthly backdrop, we’d be shocked by its appearance. Instead of icy white, Rosetta’s would appear the color of a fresh asphalt parking lot. Most comets, including Rosetta’s, are no brighter than the charcoal briquettes you use to grill hamburgers. 

Read more:

http://www.universetoday.com/114034/what-comets-parking-lots-and-charcoal-have-in-common/
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Perhaps the most important 45 seconds you'll spend today. All praise to the internet for giving us freeze-dancing Indian leprechauns.

Holiday Rap

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It is indeed possible that we love in a Matrix like simulation trillions of times smaller than an atom......

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A team of engineers is working on transparent solar panels that can double as windows, but that still capture enough light to generate power.
http://bit.ly/XQn1Jc
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