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Melissa Avery-Weir
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In case you were curious as to how I ended up needing shoulder surgery last year... it was the groceries.

It's always the groceries.

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So cute.

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Greg-the-cat was curled up just so very cutely with me Saturday afternoon that I couldn't resist taking this photo.

...Not that I tried very hard to resist.
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Now that I'm working from home for +FutureProofGames, this is generally how Jackie spends her day. If I stand still long enough (which is rare), she'll tip over and stretch out.
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Any python/Django/mock folks want to help me with this? I'm stymied.

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Tomorrow is my last day on contract at the bank. On Friday, I want to sleep for half a day and play Orcs Must Die 2 for the other half. (Endless mode is rocking my socks off.)

I'll probably work on +FutureProofGames​ stuff all day instead, but if wishes were horses, my apartment would be much more crowded. 

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Woot woot! happy dance
We released jobs system, along with a slew of enhancements and fixes. We're building our first set of jobs for players now, and they should show up in the game soon. If you already have an Alpha Zero code, you should make sure you've registered on the site with it. Once you have, you'll get an email when you have a new mission.

See the full set of updates in today's release at http://fpgam.es/1xd4XJZ

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Super-cute. 

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Are Jobs really going live this morning? I think they are! (Alas, I'm at my day job and won't be helping.) 
Yesterday we talked about our development and testing process. That process was put to the test today as we put the finishing touches on our "jobs" feature for Exploit: Zero Day.

Jobs let us give players missions and dispense story, but they are a pretty complicated system that is totally new functionality, as opposed to being an enhancement of existing code.

We use "git," a versioning system, for development, which lets us do this work separate from the known working code and keeps it all organized. However, when a titanic feature like the jobs system is ready to go, merging it into the rest of the code is still a major endeavor.

We've spent the evening finding and fixing issues in our private development version of the game, and each of us has come to at least one point where we were mystified by some arcane problem or another. Maybe one of us forgot to upload the code for a feature, or some stuff was written expecting the database to look one way but the data schema had changed by the time it was ready for merging.

But now we've smoothed out all the major roadbumps, and we're hopefully ready to do a release tomorrow with the biggest chunk of programming since we first opened the site up to select players.
Wish us luck!

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Since there are two of us here at Future Proof Games, we use a development strategy where when one person finishes a feature (or fixes a bug), the other person tests it before we reveal it to the world. Generally speaking, people just aren't great at testing their own stuff, and a second set of eyes is best.

We organize our work into weekly chunks -- every Monday night, we plan what each of us are doing until the next Monday night -- and we try not to change what we're working on in that week too much. This means that any feature we develop usually takes two weeks to go live: the first week is for any development, and the second week for the testing to be done. Any bug fixes that need to be done may extend that timeline.

It can be pretty hard to finish developing some cool new feature and it not get deployed to the world for a week or two after you're done. Something as substantial as the Jobs feature in Exploit: Zero Day (which was broken into smaller tasks over the course of a few weeks) then also sits for a few weeks while the other person tests it.

That said, while our alpha testers have found bugs in Exploit: Zero Day (thank you!), we catch plenty with this ping-pong method that they never see, which makes it a win for us. We've been doing this from very nearly Day 1 of our development practices as a company to good effect.
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