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MedicalXpress.com
2,124 followers -
Medical Xpress is a web-based medical and health news service that is part of the renowned PhysOrg.com network. Based on the years of experience as a Phys.org medical research channel, started in April 2011, Medical Xpress became a separate website.
Medical Xpress is a web-based medical and health news service that is part of the renowned PhysOrg.com network. Based on the years of experience as a Phys.org medical research channel, started in April 2011, Medical Xpress became a separate website.

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Researchers find genetic vulnerability to menthol cigarette use - A genetic variant found only in people of African descent significantly increases a smoker's preference for cigarettes containing menthol, a flavor additive. The variant of the MRGPRX4 gene is five to eight times more frequent among smokers who use menthol cigarettes than other smokers, according to an international group of researchers supported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health. ...

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Introduction of flat-rate payments accompanied by an increase in readmission rates - Seven years after the introduction of flat-rate payments at Swiss hospitals, a major study has revealed a slight increase in readmission rates. Researchers from the University of Basel and the cantonal hospital of Aarau reported the findings in the journal JAMA Network Open.

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3-D protein structure reveals a new mechanism for future anti-cancer drugs - A research team at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) has discovered a new mechanism for a class of anti-cancer drugs known as E1 inhibitors.

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Weight cycling does not adversely affect cardiovascular outcomes in women with suspected myocardial ischemia - In a recently published study, Vera Bittner, M.D., professor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Division of Cardiovascular Disease, and colleagues have demonstrated that weight cycling is associated with a lower rate of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in women with suspected ischemia, such as stroke, heart attack and heart failure.

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Suspicious spots on the lungs do not behave like metastases of rhabdomyosarcoma - Small spots on CT scans of the lungs of children with muscle cancer do not have an adverse effect on survival, according to an international research team in the Journal for Clinical Oncology. This conclusion has direct consequences for the treatment of the disease.

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Can being born blind protect people from schizophrenia? - A study carried out by The University of Western Australia has provided compelling evidence that congenital/early cortical blindness – that is when people are blind from birth or shortly after—is protective against schizophrenia.

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'Cellular barcoding' reveals how breast cancer spreads - A cutting-edge technique called cellular barcoding has been used to tag, track and pinpoint cells responsible for the spread of breast cancer from the main tumour into the blood and other organs.

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Get fit for a fit gut: Exercise might improve health by increasing gut bacterial diversity - Bacteria, often synonymous with infection and disease, may have an unfair reputation. Research indicates there are as many, if not more, bacterial cells in our bodies as human cells, meaning they play an important role in our physiology. In fact, a growing body of evidence shows that greater gut microbiota diversity (the number of different species and evenness of these species' populations) is rela...

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Researchers reveal brain connections that disadvantage night owls - 'Night owls' - those who go to bed and get up later—have fundamental differences in their brain function compared to 'morning larks' , which mean they could be disadvantaged by the constraints of a normal working day.

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It doesn't take much for soldiers to feel cared for - A soldier named Jerome Motto received caring letters from home in World War II. They helped boost his spirits and later led to one of the nation's first successful suicide interventions.
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