Profile

Cover photo
Maxx D
447 followers|416,483 views
AboutPosts

Stream

Maxx D

Shared publicly  - 
 
“Overclocked”
3
Maxx D's profile photoTheo van der Meulen's profile photo
5 comments
 
+Maxx D Thank you for that story. I love to talk about PC's and stuff xD I think Noctua is very good too but I don't really like that brown colors :p but it looks solid coolers maked from good quality :)

In my "first" game PC build I have the Cooler Master TX3 Evo. Small but it works :)) In my second PC I have the Thermaltake NIC C5. Big cooler and quite, works great.

Next week or something I start to build a game PC for my colleague. This time I have choice for the Be Quite Pure Rock cooler.
Add a comment...

Maxx D

Shared publicly  - 
 
Russian sage after sunset. I can't get close enough before sunset because it's guarded by a legion of jealous bees.

(Note that Russian sage isn't Russian and it isn't sage. It is, in fact, an Asian mint) 
3
Mike Daymon's profile photoMaxx D's profile photo
2 comments
Maxx D
+
2
3
2
 
On the plus side, I found all the bees that have been missing up until now. 
Add a comment...

Maxx D

Shared publicly  - 
 
Holy phishing expedition batman! I am so not reporting these one at a time.
10
Edward Morbius's profile photo
 
+Google+ Ping
Add a comment...

Maxx D

Shared publicly  - 
 
If companies started injecting ads into the SuperBowl without paying for the advertising space, they'd be held accountable. It is only a matter of time before it is realized that this is as true for any web site as it is for other prime advertising space.

+Stanford University would be well within their rights to demand the all the revenue that resulted in injection of ads while people viewed the Stanford web site. I expect they could also demand compensation if they have been associated with advertising they do not agree with.
 
+AT&T: The same company that cooperated with the NSA is now playing man-in-the-middle and manipulating your http connections to inject advertisements.
24 comments on original post
8
3
Chris Harpner (CSharpner)'s profile photoQuantum Pop's profile photoMatt Ballard (450nm)'s profile photo
 
"And if websites needed (yet another) reason to adopt HTTPS, here’s a good one."

Hear, hear!

Oh man, the list of problems with them doing this...
Clearly no one was thinking clearly over at AT&T.
Add a comment...

Maxx D

Shared publicly  - 
 
In the wild

Hey there little exploit... are you lost? You look like you might have a little stagefright. No worries little guy, I'm just going to dissect you.
7
2
Maxx D's profile photoDwight Goliday Jr's profile photoMichael Kuechenmeister's profile photo
12 comments
 
Dang. Well, I guess it's better to be safe than sorry!
Add a comment...

Maxx D

Shared publicly  - 
 
I miss the days when I could uninstall bloatware, wipe and clean install whatever operating system came with my computer, or even install a different operating system if I wanted to.
4
Chris Harpner (CSharpner)'s profile photoKen Starks's profile photoDianne Hackborn's profile photoMaxx D's profile photo
5 comments
Maxx D
 
+Dianne Hackborn and that's why I'm going back to Nexus devices. Never had a single problem doing what I want with those. Nexus should be the model for all tablets. 
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
447 people
FatWallet's profile photo
Lukas Herbst's profile photo
P. Mambwe's profile photo
Luís Pinto's profile photo
Bewaji Johnson's profile photo
Steve Krautkramer's profile photo
michel bres's profile photo
Thomas A. Knight's profile photo
Jordan Schnaidt's profile photo

Maxx D

Shared publicly  - 
 
Why MacPaint's Original Canvas was 416 Pixels Wide

The key to this really fast render operation was the use of the Motorola 68k's MOVEM command. MOVEM stands for Move Multiple. It can take a range of registers and move bits from an address into the M68k registers or do the reverse.
Back in the mid 80's after we had finished writing GATO for the Macintosh, I took some time to explore the underbelly of the Mac. One of these times I discovered that a single M68k operation determined the way MacPaint...
1
Maxx D's profile photoRich Freeman's profile photoMike Daymon's profile photo
4 comments
 
Interesting story. Thanks for posting.
Add a comment...

Maxx D

Shared publicly  - 
 
I should upgrade soon. Thinking about moving to DOS or CP/M. What do you think? It's really not that out of date, it has a touch keyboard after all. 
17
2
Jeffry Johnston's profile photoMike Daymon Gallery's profile photoMaxx D's profile photoOliver Herold's profile photo
7 comments
 
+Maxx D it definitely looks right-out-of-the-box pristine.
Add a comment...

Maxx D

Shared publicly  - 
 
Techno-archaeology

Just digging through some old stuff. Found a box of floppies I was saving for some reason:

AOL
Compuserve
Imagination
Prodigy
5
Tom Delmonte's profile photoMaxx D's profile photoChris Harpner (CSharpner)'s profile photoDennis D. McDonald's profile photo
13 comments
 
+Maxx D I remember how impressed I was that you could right-click on an object in OS/2 and its properties would display in a little window!
Add a comment...

Maxx D

Shared publicly  - 
 
Phenomenal change in different contexts

I looked up some information circa 1991 and found the going price of CompuServe "Connect Time" at the time. It was $12.50 per hour at a maximum of 2400bps. At that speed, you could get a megabyte of data (2/3rd of a 3.5" high density floppy disk) in about an hour.

With a 50Mbps connection running at full and constant speed, you can download about 22.5GB in one hour. If billed at the 1991 CompuServe rate of $12.50 per megabyte, that would be $281,200 USD or $492,694 in 2015 dollars (CPI inflation).

To download 22.5GB at the rate of the time, 2400bps, it would have taken just over 868 days or 2.3 years of downloading.

Now that's an overage fee.

Pot of Gold
by Jeremy Schultz
Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/tao_zhyn/442965594
2
Chris Harpner (CSharpner)'s profile photoKazriko Redclaw's profile photoMaxx D's profile photo
6 comments
Maxx D
 
+Kazriko Redclaw Compuserve as an Internet provider would make sense for 1994/1995 timeframe as would ITI2.net (registered for business April 25, 1995, verified offering unlimited dialup on a shared T-1 in 1996) but not for 1991. In 1991 the NREN was not available to the public.

It was the combination of the High Performance Computing and Communications Act of 1991 and Information Infrastructure and Technology Act of 1993 (42 U.S.C. § 1862(g) which legally opened the internet to commercial traffic in 1993) that resulted in the boom of small commercial ISPs such as ITI2, and Internet being added to various private online service providers.

Compuserve themselves did not offer general Internet access (other than an email gateway since 1989) until they acquired Spry in 1994 (launched August 1st 1996), though that did not include any Compuserve access:

Compuserve officials said a new business would be formed, possibly as soon as mid-September, to offer Internet services to commercial customers, including high-speed "T-1" leased-line Internet service, dial-up direct connection over regular phone lines and support for electronic publishing on the area of the Internet known as the World Wide Web.

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/08/31/business/company-news-compuserve-to-offer-link-to-internet.html

A number of articles confirming the numbers I found in the archive. (At the time, AOL gave you your first evening hour free, then $5 per hour after.)

https://www.google.com/search?tbm=bks&hl=en&q=Compuserve+1991+rate#hl=en&tbm=bks&q=Compuserve+Information+Services+1991+per+hour

"List Price: Compuserve, $12.50 per hour (at 1200 and 2400 bps), $22.50 per hour (9,600 bps); 30 cents per hour CompuServe connect charge or $9 per hour 800- number charge"
Add a comment...

Maxx D

Shared publicly  - 
 
Skeleton keys to the country

This is a preview of what will happen if the anti-cryptography crazies get their way but, instead of opening your luggage, they will provide access to all the infrastructure and businesses of the country. An Achilles Heel like none ever seen before.
The image above, published in 2014 in this Herald.net story and credited to The Washington Post, showed the keying patterns for all of the TSA-complaint "Travel Sentry" luggage locks.
4
James Mason's profile photo
 
Wow they published it with the bitting?

Time to change ALL the locks!!!!
Add a comment...

Maxx D

Shared publicly  - 
 
Mobile apps are dominated by Facebook and Google.

Google+ came in at 18th, just above Netflix and just below Snapchat. (This is measured by unique visitors age 18+ in June 2015) Google holds five positions in the top 10.

Google+ had 33.1 million unique users to Twitter's 41.3 million. Behind but, honestly, not that far. (These are people intentionally using Google+)
Facebook remains the king of the App Store.
2
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
447 people
FatWallet's profile photo
Lukas Herbst's profile photo
P. Mambwe's profile photo
Luís Pinto's profile photo
Bewaji Johnson's profile photo
Steve Krautkramer's profile photo
michel bres's profile photo
Thomas A. Knight's profile photo
Jordan Schnaidt's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Independent consultant
Skills
Electron wrangler
Contact Information
Home
Address
Island of Misfit Programmers
Story
Tagline
I fight for the user
Bragging rights
“I can teach you how to bottle fame, brew glory, even put a stopper on death.”
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Links
YouTube