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Matthijs Holter
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Matthijs Holter

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I fall asleep during action sequences. Especially prolonged chases. To me, they're like guitar solos: pointless and boring filler that I'm unable to focus on.
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Ara Kooser's profile photoJason Godesky's profile photoPaul Mitchener's profile photoElin Dalstål's profile photo
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I like guitar solos. Drum solos on the other hand...

Oh, yes, I'm with you on long action sequences, and chases being the worst example.
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Matthijs Holter

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I've played, and watched my son play, "Goat Simulator" for the past few days. It's just really good, stupid, gonzo fun. Lots of crazy big and little things to explore and laugh at. 

A candy shop of a game. 
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"Just buy beef from TESCO."
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Narrative puzzles

I used to like playing Call of Cthulhu and trying to figure out what had happened - the backstory, the mystery. It was often frustrating, and I didn't really always like the constant fear of dying or going mad, which, you know, is the whole idea of the game. But piecing together a narrative from fragments, that's fun.

I loved Cathy's Book, which is a "simple" ARG that uses the book as an entrance. You can just read it from start to finish, or you can figure out all the little clues and hints and understand what's REALLY going on - the extra level in the narrative.

And I super-loved True Detective. For so many reasons, and one of them was all the little hints and references to Certain Other Works, and wondering and speculating how it would all fit together. 

How about you? Favorite media with narrative puzzles?
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I might sound like a broken record player, but my answer is the larp campaign Post Mortem. Each autumn it runs pervaisivly for 2-3 months as a 24/7 larp with ARG elements.

Each autumn there is always a mystery to solve, and there is this wonderful collaborative gamism to it as everyone tries to solce it.

One autumn the players hade teory about that Edgar Allan Poes works held an important key clue and everyone collaborated in reading his works. Which proved to be wrong.

But that's the charm of a mystery. The solution should be a struggle to find.
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Anyone remember "Lexicon"? It's a wonderful game. Is it still being played?

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This is kind of neat. It's a webpage, widget, and / or an app that helps you plan things with folks in disparate time zones.
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Matthijs Holter

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Sales of "Society of Dreamers" still trickling, maybe one game a month. I wonder if people are playing it, or just buying it. This game is the closest I've come yet to a goal I don't entirely understand, but which seems to have to do with releasing the soul or something.
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Ezio Melega's profile photoDina Ramse's profile photoMatthijs Holter's profile photoSteve Hickey's profile photo
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+Steve Hickey The PDF is here: http://www.lulu.com/shop/matthijs-holter/society-of-dreamers/ebook/product-17466165.html. I haven't done much large-scale game design (as in, publishing new books) for a while, due to focusing on Playground and then The Devil's Cub & its sequel - but Play With Intent which I co-wrote with +Emily Care Boss is in some ways the next step, generalizing some ideas from SoD (along with many other things).

A new edition/version of SoD is something I've been thinking/talking about for years.
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Random navel-gazing about self-publishing

"The Devil's Cub", the first novel I've self-published (I've also had books published by Real Publishing Houses), has been out for a little over 3 months.

1. People seem to like it. The feedback I get is very positive, which is great.
2. Very few people buy it, and they're mostly my friends :) I think I've sold around 30 copies (!), and probably know the names of more than half the buyers.
3. The next book is aaaalmost finished; I need to do some more editing before I put it out there. It's going to be good.
4. The greatest thing about it is when people tell me they like the book.
5. The second greatest thing is having the physical object (Lulu POD). I like physical books.
6. I have no idea how to do marketing.
7. I'm not putting a lot of energy into marketing, either; I prefer the work of writing etc to marketing. No idea how wise this is. At the end of the day, I think I'd rather have written three books that sell abysmally than one book that sells semi-acceptably.
8. ...as long as I feel good about the actual books. And I do, in general - although, you know, I sometimes think everything I do is worthless crap etc, which I guess is pretty common.
9. Surprisingly, I make less money from the book than from my games, I think. So if I want to get rich, I'd better put more games out for sale.
10. I still have no idea if what I'm writing is Literature or not. Sometimes it feels like pure adventure and fun, sometimes it feels like I'm saying stuff about the world.
11. I like writing.

(Obligatory link: http://matthijsholter.wordpress.com/chapters-from/)
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I'm pretty sure that using a Norwegian publisher (assuming I'd written in Norwegian) to publish a physical book would help sales. First of all, a lot of Norwegian-language novels get picked up by "innkjøpsordningen", which basically means the gov't buys 1500 books and gives them to libraries etc. Second, they tend to have solid distribution networks (some publishers even own chains of bookstores, I think), so they're guaranteed exposure.

E-books in Norwegian sell very, very little.

I've never worked with an American publisher, so I have no idea there.
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I'd love some input on this:

I'm thinking of putting out several versions of the same book on Amazon, with different covers and - possibly - blurbs etc, to see which one sells best. Good idea? Bad?


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at least a cool idea.
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I'm looking for good articles/books on how Eiffel managed the construction of the Eiffel Tower. I think there are important project management lessons there, but it's hard to find details. Any tips?
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The extraordinary life and work of Monsieur Gustave Eiffel by Marrey
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I really need to kick my internet addiction.
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And at the $80 tier Mattijs will review your game and tell you why it's wrong!
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RPG person. Project facilitator.
Introduction
I work with agile project management and facilitation, trying to keep a Kanban mindset. My main hobby is roleplaying - both game design, theory and actual play. Complex/dynamic systems interest me, on an abstract level. I also like basic human things like food.
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