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Matthias Knab
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Based in Paris, KeyQuant started 2010 with $6 million and was able to attract a large institutional investor base and grow quickly. The two co-founders, trained in finance, aeronautics and statistics, graduated from top French engineering schools. They have been working together since 2004 and from 2006-2009 developed Key Trends, a medium-to-long-term systematic trading system which invests in the 50 most liquid financial futures markets.

Based on its innovative probabilistic model and auto-adaptility, Key Trends is able to detect establishing trends quickly, to characterize high potential established trends, as well as detecting trend reversals sooner, thus elevating Key Trends' profit potential versus its peers. Moreover, thanks to a proprietary, unique "Global Economic Factor" (GEF) indicator, Key Trends is able to assess the strength of global economic trends in order to optimize its portfolio exposure and improve the convexity of returns.

Hear the two co-founders Robert Baguenault de Viéville and Raphaël Gelrubin talk about:

The benefits of an “all weather”, fully systematic trading mode and the decisive role of systematization
How KeyQuant has redefined the way to look at risk and how tocapture market trends
How the model differentiates between normal and extreme risk
KeyQuant’s work environment: Autonomy & squeezing out low value-added tasks
How running a CTA from Paris helped KeyQuant achieve a flying start
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As financial firms become increasingly interconnected and globalized, their dependence on cyberspace has skyrocketed. While this amplified reliance on the infobahn has accelerated productivity and growth, it has also exposed firms to larger risks, such as hacking, malware, spyware and social engineering. The latter, which is the most disregarded element of an organization’s security program, is also the most dangerous.
Social engineering (e.g. phishing, pretexting, baiting, etc.) relies on the exploitation of human behaviors to breach an organization’s information security system. Hackers prey on propensities of human nature, including:
Trust: Some people are trusting to a fault; therefore, they do not question the intentions/identity of another person until proven to be false.
Ignorance: Disregard for the consequences of carelessness with sensitive business information.
Laziness: Willingness to cut corners, such as not filing away confidential paperwork and leaving it exposed for others to see.
Kindness: Employees want to feel that others can leverage them for their assistance and information because we’ve trained them to do so. However, this can lead to divulging too much information to the wrong person.
Social Engineering Techniques
During a social engineering scheme, criminals will typically attempt to trick victims into clicking on malevolent attachments and hyperlinks by promoting them as relevant, insightful and/or significant content. For example, a hacker sends the target firm a PDF attachment via email that appears to be an invoice. However, the PDF is actually an executable file (.exe) that runs a malicious program. The unwary employee downloads the authentic-looking PDF and unleashes the malware file into its organization’s network, granting it access to sensitive data and leaving the company at risk.
In many cases, the malware may be ransomware, meaning the compromised computer would be locked and victim demanded to make a payment in order to regain access to files. According to the FBI’s 2015 Internet Crime Report, ransomware was among the three major fraud types reported to the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) last year. The other two were business e-mail compromise and e-mail account compromise (targeting of personal email).
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In the week ending 09 September, 2016, stocks where hedge funds own a large percentage of the outstanding shares tend to outperform the S&P 500 by about 3.6% a year, research firm Symmetric said. However, a report by UBS Group AG and Campden Wealth has found that poor performance is pushing family offices away from hedge funds; a study by the Centre for International Finance and Regulation showed that hedge fund and private equity allocations are driving super fees; in a new white paper, professor Pascal Gantenbein said that the Swiss banking sector needs to evolve now; a study by Preqin showed that investors prefer computer-run hedge funds over traders; and two scholars at the University of Warwick, Warwick Business School have written a paper on “the benefits of friendship in hedge fund activism.

OP Investment Management has announced plans to launch a $250m emerging hedge fund program; Tribeca Investment has launched a Cayman vehicle to compete with overseas hedge funds; and Young Capital has announced the launch of fixed-income hedge fund that promises returns 60% a month to investors.

The Brexit could drive more UCITS fund launches; and Nedgroup has launched a UCITS global property fund called Global Property Fund.

Sumitomo Mitsui Trust is liquidating a Japan-focused hedge fund after investors withdrew money following poor performance; and Deimos Asset is closing its doors less than two years after its inception, citing a difficult fundraising environment.

The HFRX Global Hedge Fund Index gained 0.16% in August (+ 0.78% YTD);
The HFRI Fund Weighted Composite Index gained +0.4%, increasing the Index Value to 12,709 and bringing YTD performance to +3.5%;
The Lyxor Hedge Fund Index was flat, ending the week as of Aug. 30 at 0.0% (-2.0 YTD);
And the 2016 Preqin Alternative Assets Performance Monitor showed that hedge funds returned a meagre 1.09% for the first half of 2016.

Aristides Capital reported strong performance in August, up 8.0% (7.66% YTD).

Hedge funds saw three consecutive months where assets redemption is higher that new investments, with July outflow reaching $5.7bn; and new data showed that asset contagion is worse than 2008 as markets are held hostage to rates.
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In the week ending 26 August, 2016, Eurekahedge reported that hedge fund assets grew by $8.8bn during the first half of 2016, however eVestment data showed that hedge funds saw their biggest redemptions since 2009 as investors pulled $25.2bn in July. Folger Hill Asset lost a third of its assets from its 2015 peak through redemptions and losses; FS Investments said that its business development company direct lending platform committed over $830m to middle market companies; Context Macro Opportunities Fund passed $100m in assets under management on its one year anniversary; and Glencore recorded a $395m loss by hedging future production of the fuel before prices rallied.

Sihan Chu has left Paulson & Co., in June to launch his own hedge fund; David Fiszel has bucked the global trend and launched Honeycomb Asset Management; Andrew Manuel is preparing to start his own global macro hedge fund with two partners later this year; Lucas Kiely and Charles Firth are leaving Credit Suisse to start a macro hedge fund; Pennsylvania-based Context Asset is expanding its roster is expanding its roster of liquid alternatives and plans to launch three new products; Schroders has launched an externally-managed UCITS fund, called the Schroder GAIA Two Sigma Diversified fund; Scout Global Funds announced plans to launch a multi-strategy hedge fund; and BlackRock has announced the launch of the actively managed fund BlackRock Impact Bond Fund.

The Lyxor Hedge Fund Index was up a healthy 0.7% in mid-August (-2.0% YTD);
And the Barclay CTA Index gained 0.37% in July on the global equity rally (+2.12% YTD).

Ben Snider said that the strong performance of hedge funds in Q3 was due to buying the most popular stocks; Goldman Sachs said hedge funds are reporting positive returns by taking on more risk. On the negative side, Senfina Advisors fell about 5% in July (-20% YTD); Bill Ackman’s Pershing Square is having a pretty horrible summer; Parus Fund declined 1.9% in July as short positions hurt performance. A study by Northill Capital showed that focused active asset managers have outperformed; Yoshinori Nomura’s ‘hedge fund robot’ outsmarted his human master on Brexit. A number of hedge funds which snapped up Medivation’s stock made a lot of money after the drugmaker’s share prices rose; Boaz Weinstein’s Saba Capital lost 2% in its main hedge fund in July; the APS China A Share (Cayman) Fund rose 1.46% gross in July and 1.59% in 2Q (-6.38% YTD). South African hedge funds reported mixed results in July, either generally flat or moderately down; and hedge funds and other bearish speculators were rewarded after shares of Yirendai sank 35% in U.S. trading.
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Compliance concerns are driving more business decisions at hedge funds than ever before, according to the results of a survey done by Cipperman Compliance Services and hosted by Opalesque. Survey findings suggest that hedge fund managers overwhelmingly expect increases in compliance spending to continue over the next two years.
Eighty-one percent of hedge fund managers anticipate spending more on their compliance function over the next two years. Additionally, 71 percent said their greatest concern is "staying current on regulatory challenges."
The survey was conducted through Opalesque during the months of June and July.
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VIOLIN ASSETS, based in Bedburg, Germany, facilitates investments in premium stringed instruments, granting investors access to the finest musical instruments especially eligible for sustainable investment. Investors can also support some of today’s outstanding musicians in a meaningful way by making rare top instruments available to them.
Christian Reister, co-owner of Violin Assets GmbH, says that quality string instruments can be an attractive and stable asset. "Top instruments are extremely stable in value," says Reister. The young company is based at Schloss Bedburg near Cologne and has specialized in trading high-quality string instruments.
He added, "The value of stringed instruments decoupled from other asset classes such as stocks, bonds, gold or real estate." In addition, the instrument market is largely dominated by long-term investors. "This is certainly a reason for the tendency of top instruments to increase in value." Christian Reister continues. According to the Fuchs-Taxe benchmark, quality string instruments have over the past hundred years registered an annual value growth of between 5-8 per cent per annum, and some instruments even significantly higher.
Investment and patronage
With Violin Assets, it’s only a small step from investor to patron, as many highly talented young artists or already established virtuosos have demand for top instruments. Many owners of master violins, violas or celli provide their instrument as loan to an exceptional artist.
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The insider trading case against Leon Cooperman is eerily similar to the SEC's loss to Mark Cuban, by relying on a "he-said, she-said" claim of an oral promise not to trade - but is bolstered by Cooperman asserting his right against self-incrimination during SEC testimony. The gravamen of the case is the same: that Cooperman made an oral agreement not to trade stock based on information from a company executive.[1] But because Cooperman "took the Fifth" during his SEC investigative testimony, the SEC may have the upper hand this time.

The SEC is relying on Mr. Cooperman's alleged oral promise not to trade because it has to prove that he had a "fiduciary or other similar relationship of trust and confidence" with Atlas Pipeline Partners, L.P. ("APL") not to use its confidential information about a merger with Elk City for his personal gain.[2] Mr. Cooperman was not an APL officer or employee, and thus he did not have a traditional fiduciary relationship with APL - he was merely a 9% stockholder. The alleged promise establishes a "similar relationship of trust and confidence" with APL under the "temporary insider" theory of liability.[3] Thus, the SEC had to rely on the alleged oral promise to keep Atlas's information about a pending merger confidential to prove liability.

I. SEC's Cuban Loss Shows "He-Said, She-Said" Allegations of an Oral Promise of Confidentiality Often Do Not Hold Up in Court

The obvious problem with the SEC's reliance on an alleged oral promise is that the SEC lost on the exact same theory in the Mark Cuban case. In Cuban, the SEC alleged that Cuban orally agreed on a June 28, 2004 phone call "that he would keep whatever information the CEO intended to share with him confidential," but then sold Mamma.com stock right after CEO told him about an upcoming PIPE offering.[4] Mamma.com's CEO testified at his deposition that Mr. Cuban orally agreed not to trade on information about the PIPE offering. But he did not show up a trial, because he was out of the country in Canada at the time, so the SEC had to rely on his deposition testimony. The Cuban jury rejected the CEO's testimony, and ruled that Cuban never agreed not to trade on the information he learned on the phone call.[5]

As with the CEO in Cuban, the "APL Executive 1" the SEC relies on in the Cooperman case may suffer from credibility issues. Importantly, the Executive is apparently unable to pin down the specific date and phone conversation when Cooperman allegedly "explicitly agreed that he could not and would not use the confidential information APL Executive 1 told him to trade APL securities."[6] The SEC Complaint cites three phone calls on July 7, 19 and 20, 2010, but only vaguely alleges that Cooperman orally agreed not to trade "during one of these conversations." Such vagueness and imprecision suggests that APL Executive 1 does not remember which call involved the alleged Cooperman oral agreement not to trade, and thus calls into question his memory of other details, such as whether there was any agreement not to trade. Similarly, the APL Executive has a motive to lie to avoid his own insider trading liability: He may have freely shared confidential information about the APL merger to induce Cooperman to hold onto APL stock (which was doing poorly) but is now making up the oral agreement to portray himself innocently to regulators.

In stark contrast, in Cuban, the SEC complaint identified the exact date of the call (June 28, 2004), and several internal Mamma.com memos and emails from that time period that explicitly referenced the call and Cuban's alleged promise not to trade.[7] Yet the jury still rejected the SEC's allegation of an oral agreement. The Cuban jury verdict suggests that the SEC's less detailed allegations in Cooperman may also be rejected by a jury.

II. SEC's Case is Bolstered by Cooperman Pleading the Fifth in S.E.C. Testimony and Allegations that He Tried to Influence an APL Executive's Testimony.
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In the week ending 16 September, 2016, HFR said that hedge fund launches and liquidations fell in the second quarter of this year from the first quarter; Rory Priday has launched a new hedge fund with $75m in assets; BlackRock has started a merger arbitrage hedge fund with a $200m investment from New Zealand’s sovereign-wealth fund; Westbeck Capital is seeking regulatory clearance for its energy fund and is targeting $100m in assets; Monsoon Capital is planning to launching its latest hedge fund, the Monsoon India Dynamic Alpha Strategy; Paulus Ingram has launched a sustainable investment fund; Alpha UCITS Platform has launched the Fair Oaks Dynamic Credit UCITS Fund; and Tages Capital has launched Tages Alternative Risk Premia Fund to focus on alternative risk premia.

Andrew Bazarian is shutting down his Asia-focused hedge fund that was backed by Alibaba Group.

The Lyxor Hedge Fund Index ended the week as of end Sept. 06, flat (-1.9% YTD);
The Eurekahedge Hedge Fund Index was flat in August, up 2.50% YTD;
The Preqin All-Strategies Hedge Fund benchmark returned 0.97%, taking overall industry performance to 4.67% YTD;
The SS&C GlobeOp Hedge Fund Performance Index for August 2016 measured 0.73%;
And the IQ Hedge Merger Arbitrage Index was up 1.12% (+3.57% YTD).

Capital Management is enjoying positive performance from energy troubles and is up 36% YTD through August; and CSAM said that commodities declined in August, largely driven by supply fundamentals.

Bridgewater Associates has attracted $22.5bn in fresh assets since it started a new strategy early last year, however, some of the biggest and best-known hedge funds can’t hang on to client capital and are bleeding cash. Perry Capital has lost 60% of its assets in less than a year after posting declines since 2014; London & Capital has tripled its private equity and hedge fund strategies to £250m;Thoma Bravo has closed its latest flagship fund, Fund XII, on $7.6bn; passive funds now account for a third of mutual fund assets, up from a quarter in just three years; and Preqin reported that California’s alternative assets industry expands to record $732bn in AuM.
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In the week ending 02 September, 2016, Preqin said that the hedge fund industry saw $34bn in asset withdrawals in the first half of 2016, as total AuM reached $3.11tln. However, separate data from eVestment showed that that investors siphoned off some $25.2bn in July ($55.9bn in H1), a scale comparable to 2009 global financial crisis; Preqin added that CTAs posted the highest net inflows in H1 with $16.6bn. Gemini Alternative said that assets on its Galaxy Plus Fund surpassed $500m; Kayne Anderson Capital has closed its newest energy-focused private equity fund, the Kayne Private Energy Income Fund on $1.55bn. Leda Braga’s Systematica Investments has increased its external assets by almost $2.5bn; and Visium Global Fund said it would return 95% of its assets to investors.

Takashi Makita is gearing up to launch his own computer-driven hedge fund firm, Niten Capital Management; Maj Invest is looking to boost acquisitions in the micro finance in the Andean region with $100m fund; James Spenceley is planning to launch a new fund that is focused in small-cap sector; OPIM, in association with OPFG, has announced its plans to invest up to $250m in emerging managers on its hedge fund platform; Mark Schulze and Jason Vogt are preparing to launch their own commodity-focused hedge fund; and Vista CTA launched the Vista CTA Freight Program on 1st August, a systematic statistical arbitrage trading program.

TPG-Axon Capital Management is shutting its office in Hong Kong and ending its presence in Tokyo in the coming months.

The Lyxor Hedge Fund Index was flat in the week ending Aug. 23 (-2.0% YTD).

David Einhorn’s Greenlight Capital reported a performance increase of 5.4% year-to-date; Bill Ackman’s Pershing Square gained 5.8% in August, boosted by strong gains at Valeant. The Geneva Global Macro hedge fund is up 75.7% YTD, after returning 2% in July. Generally, macro strategies were the best performers over the past 12 months, Preqin data showed; and Vanguard Group said it "has hit a home run" with its Vanguard Alternative Strategies Fund.
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In the week ending 18 August, 2016, it was reported that hedge funds are increasingly agreeing to hurdle rates which would be becoming the norm and more creative. While many investors are unhappy with underformance, hedge funds have also broadly avoided big losses despite the Brexit shock. However, Barry Rosenstein’s Jana partners suffered its worst performance in its 15-year history with its main fund in negative territory; Horseman Global lost -2.68% for the month of July (+3.13% YTD); Crispin Odey has emerged as the worst performing European hedge fund manager so far this year; distressed debt hedge funds have missed out on bond rebound, data showed. Meanwhile, Senvest Management has surged back into the black for the year on bets on small, out-of-favour companies; and Matrix Capital returned 8.3% net in the second quarter, outperforming the S&P 500 index which returned 2.5%.
Preqin Hedge Fund Index up 2.17% in July (+3.67% YTD) as industry marks 5th consecutive months of gains;
The HFRI EM: Latin America Index surged +8.9% in 2Q (+24.4% YTD);
The Barclay Hedge Fund Index gained 1.99% in July (+2.99% YTD);
The IndexIQ Hedge Index Family ended last month with all six indexes up;
And the UCITS HFS Index has bounced back with gains of 0.75%.
Eurekahedge said that investors pulled out $5.7bn in hedge funds assets last month; investors pulled out money from Tudor Investment and Brevan Howard because of poor performance; China-focused hedge funds declined in the first seven months of 2016 but still beat their benchmark by a margin of almost 10% for the year; the SS&C GlobeOp Forward Redemption Indicator for August measured 3.86%, up from 2.95% in July; Carl Icahn is losing nearly $500m daily after UBS threw in the towel and turned bearish on his investment vehicle; new data showed that Och-Ziff Capital explored a partial sale of the firm earlier this year; and Paul Tudor Jones has raised his hedge fund’s assets to show his investors he has not lost his mojo.
On the legal scene; Steven Cohen has settled with the CFTC to refrain from engaging in commodities trading until at least Dec. 31, 2017; Point72 and Glenview Capital have cut ties with Anthony Cirillo because of his alleged ties with the mob; a bankruptcy trustee has sued PricewaterhouseCoopers for a record $5.5bn for negligence in mortgage fraud case; the SEC has filed fraud charges against Eden Arc Capital and Donald Lathen over an alleged scheme targeting terminally ill patients; Beachwood Re said it cut ties with Platinum Partners because of the kickback scandal; Jason Thorell was granted immunity for helping authorities build case against Visuim Asset; U.S. authorities said that Samuel Mebiame charged with paying bribes while working for a company set up by Och-Ziff Capital; and U.S. hedge funds sued four big Australian banks over alleged artificial fixing of BBSW-based derivatives prices.
Anna Raytcheva will be leaving Citigroup to launch her own macro hedge fund.
A record number of Chinese managers were forced to liquidate their funds in the first six months of the year; and JPMorgan’s investment unit said it will liquidate a Japan-focused fund after a surge of investor withdrawals.
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In the week ending 12 August, 2016, a survey by Barclays has found that hedge funds assets are declining on insufficient returns because of overcapacity; the Barclays study added that the number of hedge funds are on track to shrink this year. The industry is slowing as returns are down and investors are pulling their money out of the funds. However, data from Eurekahedge showed that hedge funds grew by $19.9bn in 1H despite losses of $5.2bn during the period. Total capital invested in Asian hedge funds decreased to $109.7bn in 2Q, bringing Asian hedge fund capital to the lowest level since 3Q13;

Bill Ackman made $113m as Valeant share prices jump. North Castle Partners has closed its sixth focused fund on $300m, after just over six months; and Mariner Investment has announced the closing of a $503m collateralized loan obligation.

Starwood Capital Group is raising capital to launch a new $6bn ‘panic fund’; Somar Global Fund soft-launches an equity hedge fund with focus on secular changes; Bill Miller is severing ties with Legg Mason after more than three decades to focus on his new hedge fund; Nuveen and Artivest have formed a partnership to launch a new alternatives platform; Parantoux is launching in mid-August a China-centric event-driven long/short fund; and Shaunak Khire has developed Emma AI to start a new fund designed to outsmart humans and computers.

Anandar Capital Management is shutting down its hedge fund due to a disagreement between the partners.

The HFRI Fund Weighted Composite Index advanced +1.7% in July (+3.0% YTD);
The Lyxor Hedge Fund Index was down -0.7% as of Aug. 2 (-2.7% YTD);
The eVestment Hedge Fund Performance Report said that hedge funds gained +1.89% in July and +3.29% year-to-date;
And the Wilshire Liquid Alternative Index gained 1.17%.

Renaissance Technologies and Viking Global posted positive performances in July as hedge funds extended their rebound; Violin Assets co-owner Christian Reister has proven that string instruments can provide a stable investment with 8% yield per annum; Brevan Howard's main fund was down 1% in the year to the end of July; for the first time since it started 15 years ago, Adage Capital Management is trailing the stock market; Astenbeck Capital lost about 16% in July as crude oil prices fell; Maverick Capital’s Levered fund was up 5.4% in the second quarter; the SS&C GlobeOp Hedge Fund Performance Index for July 2016 measures 1.83%; Lyxor AM said that the post-Brexit market rally in July fuelled directional hedge fund strategies such as L/S equity and event-driven; Magellan Financial Group booked a 14% lift in annual profit, reaching $198.4m for the year through June; King Street Capital has produced unaudited gross returns for the second quarter and first half of 2016 of 1.46% and 1.4% respectively; and Brummer & Partners’ flagship $5.7bn multi-strategy fund is back in the black in 2016.

Ascalon Capital is seeding Hong Kong-based multi-strategy hedge fund Seyon Asset.
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In the week ending 05 August, 2016, hedge funds and alternative investment managers continued making inroads into Asia's institutional investor community with the South Korean government announcing it will gradually raise the overseas and alternative investment proportion in seven state-run pension funds. Likewise, Korea Post will buy more U.S. assets as the state-run fund joins a global hunt for returns amid record-low interest rates. South Korea’s alternative investments had exceeded $233bn last year, and short selling is resurging in South Korea despite rules on disclosure. Hedge funds in Korea are attracting wealthy investors – leading to a surging market, while in Japan the Japan Post Bank said it would extend its hedge fund-of-funds allocations to three managers.

In the US, things look different with the New Jersey Investment Council saying it would cut its $9.1bn hedge funds investment by half. It was also reported that BlackRock’s fund-of-hedge funds unit will get $1bn from New Jersey pension as part of an effort to tap lower fees from asset managers. The Ohio School Employees Retirement System, Columbus, made a direct hedge fund investment of $50m; ING’s pension fund is planning to ramp up its inflation-risk hedge to protect the pensions of its 71,500 participants. U.S. college endowments are poised to take the worst slide in performance since the 2009 recession; the Massachusetts Pension Reserves Investment Management Board returned 2.3% in the fiscal year ended June 30; the Rhode Island state pension fund lost $466m over the past fiscal year, and Goldman Sachs’ retirement plan is liquidating a $350m hedge fund run by Och-Ziff Capital. AIG has reduced bets on event-driven and long-short strategies as it also scaled back hedge fund investments; and Dutch pension SPH will reduce its managers as it switches to passive investment.

Aurelia Lamorre-Cargill is aiming to raise $300m in initial funding to launch a commodity hedge fund; John Pereira is back and is planning to raise $50m for his new India Fund; Blue Pool Capital is in the final talks to seed a new pan-Asia hedge fund to be launched by Avinash Abraham; Schonfeld Strategic is backing a new quant fund from Eric Tavel; Franklin Templeton and K2 Advisors will launch a liquid alternative global macro fund; and Kenneth Brody has come out of retirement to launch a new money management firm.

Nikko Asset Management plans to launch a Luxembourg-domiciled Global Credit UCITS fund.

Balyasny Asset Management is shutting down a $250m "discretionary" portfolio run by Torbjorn Andreassen who is leaving the firm.

The HFRX Global Hedge Fund Index gained +1.45% in July (+0.62% YTD);
The Lyxor Hedge Fund Index was up;
The MVIS Global Long/Short Equity Index rose 3.95%, down 2.2% YOY;
And the Parker FX Index returned 0.15% in June (+0.97% YTD).
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