Profile

Cover photo
Matthew Zelinsky
Worked at Vector Marketing
Attended Louisiana State University
Lives in Houston, TX
610 followers|120,309 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTubeReviews

Stream

Matthew Zelinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
INCREDIBLE homily from Pope Francis

My friends, Jesus is the Lord of risk, of the eternal “more”. Jesus is not the Lord of comfort, security and ease. Following Jesus demands a good dose of courage, a readiness to trade in the sofa for a pair of walking shoes and to set out on new and uncharted paths. To blaze trails that open up new horizons capable of spreading joy, the joy that is born of God’s love and wells up in your hearts with every act of mercy. To take the path of the “craziness” of our God, who teaches us to encounter him in the hungry, the thirsty, the naked, the sick, the friend in trouble, the prisoner, the refugee and the migrant, and our neighbours who feel abandoned. To take the path of our God, who encourages us to be politicians, thinkers, social activists. The God who asks us to devise an economy inspired by solidarity. In all the settings in which you find yourselves, God’s love invites you bring the Good News, making of your own lives a gift to him and to others.
...
God expects something from you. God wants something from you. God hopes in you. God comes to break down all our fences. He comes to open the doors of our lives, our dreams, our ways of seeing things. God comes to break open everything that keeps you closed in. He is encouraging you to dream. He wants to make you see that, with you, the world can be different. For the fact is, unless you offer the best of yourselves, the world will never be different.
The times we live in do not call for young “couch potatoes” but for young people with shoes, or better, boots laced. It only takes players on the first string, and it has no room for bench-warmers. Today’s world demands that you be a protagonist of history because life is always beautiful when we choose to live it fully, when we choose to leave a mark. History today calls us to defend our dignity and not to let others decide our future. As he did on Pentecost, the Lord wants to work one of the greatest miracles we can experience; he wants to turn your hands, my hands, our hands, into signs of reconciliation, of communion, of creation. He wants your hands to continue building the world of today. And he wants to build that world with you.
You might say to me: Father, but I have my limits, I am a sinner, what can I do? When the Lord calls us, he doesn’t worry about what we are, what we have been, or what we have done or not done. Quite the opposite. When he calls us, he is thinking about everything we have to give, all the love we are capable of spreading. His bets are on the future, on tomorrow. Jesus is pointing you to the future.
So today, my friends, Jesus is inviting you, calling you, to leave your mark on life, to leave a mark on history, your own and that of many others as well.
Life nowadays tells us that it is much easier to concentrate on what divides us, what keeps us apart. People try to make us believe that being closed in on ourselves is the best way to keep safe from harm. Today, we adults need you to teach us how to live in diversity, in dialogue, to experience multiculturalism not as a threat but an opportunity. Have the courage to teach us that it is easier to build bridges than walls! Together we ask that you challenge us to take the path of fraternity. To build bridges... Do you know the first bridge that has to be built? It is a bridge that we can build here and now – by reaching out and taking each other’s hand. Come on, build it now, here, this first of bridges: take each other’s hand. This is a great bridge of brotherhood, and would that the powers of this world might learn to build it... not for pictures on the evening news but for building ever bigger bridges. May this human bridge be the beginning of many, many others; in that way, it will leave a mark.
Today Jesus, who is the way, the truth and the life, is calling you to leave your mark on history. He, who is life, is asking each of you to leave a mark that brings life to your own history and that of many others. He, who is truth, is asking you to abandon the paths of rejection, division and emptiness. Are you up to this? What answer will you give, with your hands and with your feet, to the Lord, who is the way, the truth and the life?
...
As we were praying, I thought of the Apostles on the day of Pentecost. Picturing them can help us come to appreciate all that God dreams of accomplishing in our lives, in us and with us. That day, the disciples were together behind locked doors, out of fear. They felt threatened, surrounded by an atmosphere of persecution that had cornered them in a little room and left them silent and paralyzed. Fear had taken hold of them. Then, in that situation, something spectacular, something grandiose, occurred. The Holy Spirit and tongues as of fire came to rest upon each of them, propelling them towards an undreamt-of adventure.
...
But in life there is another, even more dangerous, kind of paralysis. It is not easy to put our finger on it. I like to describe it as the paralysis that comes from confusing happiness with a sofa. In other words, to think that in order to be happy all we need is a good sofa. A sofa that makes us feel comfortable, calm, safe. A sofa like one of those we have nowadays with a built-in massage unit to put us to sleep. A sofa that promises us hours of comfort so we can escape to the world of videogames and spend all kinds of time in front of a computer screen. A sofa that keeps us safe from any kind of pain and fear. A sofa that allows us to stay home without needing to work at, or worry about, anything. “Sofa-happiness”! That is probably the most harmful and insidious form of paralysis, since little by little, without even realizing it, we start to nod off, to grow drowsy and dull while others – perhaps more alert than we are, but not necessarily better – decide our future for us. For many people in fact, it is much easier and better to have drowsy and dull kids who confuse happiness with a sofa. For many people, that is more convenient than having young people who are alert and searching, trying to respond to God’s dream and to all the restlessness present in the human heart.
The truth, though, is something else. Dear young people, we didn’t come into this work to “vegetate”, to take it easy, to make our lives a comfortable sofa to fall asleep on. No, we came for another reason: to leave a mark. It is very sad to pass through life without leaving a mark. But when we opt for ease and convenience, for confusing happiness with consumption, then we end up paying a high price indeed: we lose our freedom.
This is itself a great form of paralysis, whenever we start thinking that happiness is the same as comfort and convenience, that being happy means going through life asleep or on tranquillizers, that the only way to be happy is to live in a haze. Certainly, drugs are bad, but there are plenty of other socially acceptable drugs, that can end up enslaving us just the same. One way or the other, they rob us of our greatest treasure: our freedom.
...
For us, here, today, coming from different parts of the world, the suffering and the wars that many young people experience are no longer anonymous, something we read about in the papers. They have a name, they have a face, they have a story, they are close at hand. Today the war in Syria has caused pain and suffering for so many people, for so many young people like our good friend Rand, who has come here and asked us to pray for his beloved country.
Some situations seem distant until in some way we touch them. We don’t appreciate certain things because we only see them on the screen of a cell phone or a computer. But when we come into contact with life, with people’s lives, not just images on a screen, something powerful happens. We feel the need to get involved. To see that there are no more “forgotten cities”, to use Rand’s words, or brothers and sisters of ours “surrounded by death and killing”, completely helpless. Dear friends, I ask that we join in prayer for the sufferings of all the victims of war and for the many families of beloved Syria and other parts of our world. Once and for all, may we realize that nothing justifies shedding the blood of a brother or sister; that nothing is more precious than the person next to us. In asking you to pray for this, I would also like to thank Natalia and Miguel for sharing their own battles and inner conflicts. You told us about your struggles, and about how you succeeded in overcoming them. Both of you are a living sign of what God’s mercy wants to accomplish in us.
1
Add a comment...

Matthew Zelinsky

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Matthew Zelinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
Twitter is down during Kobe's last game & the Warriors going for NBA record wins, where do we go?! #Panic #FailWhaleWednesday 
1
Add a comment...

Matthew Zelinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
CSPAN has a really cool clipping tool, if I met someone who knew nothing about Christianity I might show them this. Incredible, courageous, & beautiful Christ-centered, hopeful, and consoling homily from a son to a father: joked about finding his dad in his confessional line, catechized on the Mass, funerals, public service, Jesus in the Eucharist; words don't do it justice but here they are: “Every funeral reminds us of just how thin the veil is between this world and the next. Between time and eternity. Between the opportunity for conversion, and the moment of judgment. So we cannot depart here unchanged.”

“Writing years ago to a Presbyterian minister, whose funeral service he admired, he summarized quite nicely the pitfalls of funerals – and why he didn’t like eulogies. He wrote: “Even when the deceased was an admirable person – indeed especially when the deceased was an admirable person – praise for his virtues can cause us to forget that we are praying for and giving thanks for God’s inexplicable mercy to a sinner.” Now he would not have exempted himself from that. We are here then, as he would want: to pray for God’s inexplicable mercy to a sinner. To this sinner: Antonin Scalia. Let us not show him a false love, and allow our admiration to deprive him of our prayers.”

“He was the father that God gave us for the great adventure of family life”

Transcript: “We are gathered here because of one man. A man known personally to many of us; known only by reputation to even more. A man loved by many, scorned by others. A man known for great controversy, and for great compassion. That man, of course, is Jesus of Nazareth.

It is He whom we proclaim. Jesus Christ, Son of the Father, born of the Virgen Mary, crucified, buried, risen, seated at the right hand of the Father. It is because of Him. Because of His life, death, and resurrection that we do not mourn as those who have no hope, but in confidence we commend Antonin Scalia to the mercy of God. Scripture says Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever.

And that sets a good course for our thoughts and our prayers here today. In effect we look in three directions. To yesterday in thanksgiving. To today in petition. And into eternity with hope. WE look to Jesus Christ yesterday, that is to the past, in thanksgiving for the blessings God bestowed upon dad. In the past week many have recounted what dad did for them. But here today we recount what God did for dad. How He blessed him. We give thanks, first of all, for the atoning death and life giving resurrection of Jesus Christ. Our Lord died and rose not only for all of us, but also for each of us. And at this time we look to that yesterday of His death and resurrection and we give thanks that He died and rose for dad. Further we give thanks that Jesus brought him to a new life in Baptism, nourished him with the Eucharist, and healed him in the confessional. We give thanks that Jesus bestowed upon him 55 years of marriage to the woman he loved, a woman who could match him at every step. And even hold him accountable. God blessed dad with a deep Catholic faith. The conviction that Christ’s presence and power continue in the world today through His body, the Church. He loved the clarity and coherence of the Church’s teachings. He treasured the Church’s ceremonies, especially the beauty her ancient worship. He trusted the power of her sacraments. As the means of salvation. As Christ working within him for his salvation.

Although one time, one Saturday afternoon, he did scold me for having heard confessions that afternoon, that same day. And I hope that is come source of consolation if there are any lawyers present that the roman collar was not a shield against his criticism. The issue that evening was not that I had been hearing confessions, but that he had found himself in my confessional line – and he quickly departed it. As he put it later: ‘like heck if I’m confessing to you’. The feeling was mutual. God blessed dad, as is well known, with a love for his country. He knew well what a close run thing the founding of our nation was. And he saw in that founding, as did the Founders themselves, a blessing. A blessing quickly lost when faith is banned from the public square or when we refuse to bring it there. So he understood that there is no conflict between loving God and loving one’s country. Between one’s faith and one’s public service. Dad understood that the deeper he went in his Catholic faith the better a citizen and public servant he became. God blessed him with a desire to be the country’s good servant because he was God’s first.

We Scalia’s however give thanks for a particular blessing God bestowed: God blessed dad with a love for his family. We have been thrilled to read and hear the many words of prayer and admiration for him; for his intellect, his writings, his speeches, his influence and so on. But more important to us, and to him, is that he was dad. He was the father that God gave us for the great adventure of family life. Sure, he forgot our names at times or mixed them up, but there are nine of us. He loved us. And sought to show that love. And sought to share the blessing of the faith he treasured. And he gave us one another. To have each other for support. That’s the greatest wealth parents can bestow. And right now we are particularly grateful for it.

So we look to the past, to Jesus Christ yesterday. We call to mind all of these blessings. And we give our lord the honor and glory for them, for they are His work. We look to Jesus today in petition. To the present moment, here and now, as we mourn the one we love and admire. The one who’s absence pains us. Today we pray for him. We pray for the repose of him soul. We thank God for His goodness to dad, as is right and just. But we also know that, although dad believed, he did so imperfectly – like the rest of us. He tried to love God in neighbor, but like the rest of us did so imperfectly. He was a practicing Catholic. Practicing in the sense that he hadn’t perfected it yet. Or rather – Christ was not yet perfected in him. And only those in whom Christ is brought to perfection can enter Heaven.

We are here then to lend our prayers to that perfecting. To that final work of God’s grace. From freeing dad from every encumbrance of sin. But don’t take my word for it. Dad himself, not surprisingly, had something to say on the matter. Writing years ago to a Presbyterian minister, whose funeral service he admired, he summarized quite nicely the pitfalls of funerals – and why he didn’t like eulogies. He wrote: “Even when the deceased was an admirable person – indeed especially when the deceased was an admirable person – praise for his virtues can cause us to forget that we are praying for and giving thanks for God’s inexplicable mercy to a sinner.” Now he would not have exempted himself from that. We are here then, as he would want: to pray for God’s inexplicable mercy to a sinner. To this sinner: Antonin Scalia. Let us not show him a false love, and allow our admiration to deprive him of our prayers. We continue to show affection for him, and do good for him, by praying for him. That all stain of sin be washed away – that all wounds be healed – that he be purified of all that is not Christ. That he rest in peace.

Finally we look to Jesus forever, into eternity. Or better: we consider our own place in eternity and whether it will be with the Lord. Even as we pray for dad to enter swiftly into eternal glory, we should be mindful of ourselves. Every funeral reminds us of just how thin the veil is between this world and the next. Between time and eternity. Between the opportunity for conversion, and the moment of judgment. So we cannot depart here unchanged.

It makes no sense to celebrate God’s goodness and mercy to dad if we are not attentive and responsive to those realities in our own lives. We must allow this encounter with eternity to change us. To turn us from sin – and towards the Lord. The English-Dominican Father Bee Jared (sp) put it beautifully when he prayed: ‘Oh strong Son of God, while you prepare a place for us, prepare us also for that happy place. That we may be with you, and with those we love, for all eternity. Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever.

My dear friends this is also the structure of the Mass – the greatest prayer we can offer for dad because it’s not our prayer, but the Lord’s. The Mass looks to Jesus yesterday, it reaches into the past, reaches to the Last Supper, to the crucifixion, to the resurrection, and it makes those mysteries – and their power – present here on this altar. Jesus Himself becomes present here today, under the form of bread and wine, so that we can unite all our prayers of thanksgiving, sorrow, and petition with Christ Himself as an offering to the Father. And all of this with a view to eternity, stretching towards Heaven where we hope one day to enjoy that perfect union with God Himself and to see dad again, and with him rejoice in the communion of Saints.” – Father Paul Scalia homily for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia
The essence of the Christian faith, incredible eulogy from a son to a father trusting him to God the Father, through Jesus Christ, and by the love of the Holy Spirit
1
Add a comment...
In his circles
307 people
Have him in circles
610 people
Dan Soto's profile photo
Mrs.Carley Rose's profile photo
Amanda Hawkins's profile photo
Baby Cate's profile photo
Donna LeGore's profile photo
Coach Berry's profile photo
Steven Ziegler's profile photo
Bekah Johnson's profile photo
Stephanie Strong's profile photo

Matthew Zelinsky

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...
6
Erik Epp's profile photoMiguel G.'s profile photo
3 comments
 
+Erik Epp he's actually worst than that... He's corrupting the WORD. Going against GOD's word... Dont trust that snake.
Add a comment...

Matthew Zelinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
Donald Drumpf (his real family name) is the kind of leader Americans defeated in 1945, because order simply never comes out of disorder. But a pendulum does eventually stop swinging. That principle is written in the stars. Will our future also be found by looking up, or down into the sewer of mob rule?
1
Add a comment...

Matthew Zelinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
What the British writer's 1904 novel teaches us about today's political climate.
1
Add a comment...

Matthew Zelinsky

Shared publicly  - 
 
Just going to re-watch this before all my interviews now (2:50 & 6:20 specifically): Encountering God fundamentally changes you: "one of the problems today is we turn Christianity into a self help program 'follow these steps', no! Christianity is allowing Christ to live His life in you - that's what it means to be holy!"

#BeASaint: "the Saint is someone who has surrendered her life to someone else, has given his life over to a higher power"

Discernment & action: "I become passive before the one who now lives His life in me", "if love is truly willing the good of the other as other it's not something we can do on our own", "love which is a complete abandonment of your own program or project, it's re-centering your life so that the other is more important than you", living out our Baptismal call to holiness, being radically content in God's timing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7a7MFs0cQc
1
Add a comment...
People
In his circles
307 people
Have him in circles
610 people
Dan Soto's profile photo
Mrs.Carley Rose's profile photo
Amanda Hawkins's profile photo
Baby Cate's profile photo
Donna LeGore's profile photo
Coach Berry's profile photo
Steven Ziegler's profile photo
Bekah Johnson's profile photo
Stephanie Strong's profile photo
Education
  • Louisiana State University
    Bioengineering, 2010 - 2013
  • Stratford HS
    2006 - 2010
  • University of Dallas
    Pastoral Ministry, 2013 - 2016
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
  • Kingdom Rush
  • Pac-Man 256
Story
Tagline
Faith. Family. Friends. Pastoral Ministry Undergraduate @ University of Dallas. Pittsburgh Steelers, LSU Tigers, Stratford Spartans Fan. God Bless!
Bragging rights
Eagle Scout
Work
Occupation
Associate Director of Youth Faith Formation - St. Michael Catholic Church (Youth Minister)
Employment
  • Vector Marketing
    Sales Representative, 2011 - 2011
  • The Pines Catholic Camp
    Counselor, 2014 - 2014
  • St. Michael Catholic Church
    Associate Director of Youth Faith Formation, 2016 - present
    Youth Minister
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Houston, TX
Previously
Baton Rouge, LA - Fort Worth, TX - Rome, Italy
#AYCHouston #Catholic
Public - in the last week
reviewed in the last week
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
21 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago