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Matthew McQuilkin
Works at PCC Natural Markets
Attended Washington State University, Pullman, WA
Lived in Seattle, WA
142 followers|1,143,076 views
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Story
Tagline
I am a beautiful person.
Introduction
I am a beautiful person.
Bragging rights
I know who I am.
Education
  • Washington State University, Pullman, WA
    English, 1994 - 1988
  • John R. Rogers High School, Spokane, WA
    1994 - 1990
  • Garry Middle School, Spokane, WA
    1988 - 1990
  • Longfellow Elementary, Spokane, WA
    1987 - 1988
  • Cooper Elementary, Spokane, WA
    1986 - 1987
  • Bemis Elementary, Spokane, WA
    1985 - 1986
  • Temple Baptist, Olympia, WA
    1981 - 1985
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Birthday
April 30
Work
Occupation
"Merchandising Specialist," whatever that means
Employment
  • PCC Natural Markets
    Assistant Merchandiser, 2002 - present
  • Communications Center, Inc
    Telephone Interviewer, 1995 - 1996
  • Cleaning Consultants
    Clerk II, 1999 - 1999
  • Seattle Gay News
    Staff Writer, 1999 - 2000
  • Seattle Gay Standard
    Managing Editor, 2000 - 2001
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Seattle, WA - Pullman, WA - Spokane, WA - Olympia, WA

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Matthew McQuilkin

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Don't settle for acceptance. That's settling for crumbs, which is bullshit. Demand to be celebrated.
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Click on the latest Savage Lovecast, move forward to 41:50, and just listen. Please. Just do it. #blacklivesmatter
With Wonkette's Rebecca Schoenkopf Dan Savage, America's only advice columnist, answers your sex questions on the Internets. To record a question for Dan to be answered in a later podcast, call 206-302-2064.
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This is the driver’s license issued to my paternal grandfather a decade ago. I always marveled that they even let him take the photo in his Santa costume.

He was the last of my living grandparents and he died yesterday.

It’s sad, but not a tragedy. He was 87 years old. He lived a long, good life, taken care of by someone else for nearly all of it. In my lifetime, it was first by Grandma, to such an extent that he lasted far longer after Grandma passed — four and a half years — than any of us expected. Things were touch and go a few years ago until Dad and Sherri found a home in Olympia for him to live in, in which he flourished because now they were the ones taking such good care of him.

Real talk: through most of my life, although I generally liked him, and I did love him, Grandpa was kind of an asshole. In the past couple of years, to my amazement, he became far less so, a decent, pleasant human being. This is a guy who went out with a sort of sense of redemption. He was a massive irritant for many years, though occasionally fun and funny, but in the end he left me with a positive memory of him. He left the world with an impression of him as a good man.

He will of course be forever intertwined with Grandma as a unit, the beacon for the entire extended family, the center around which we all revolved. I have an incredibly strong sense of family and it’s because of them.

And now some fun facts!

*You can see on the license that his middle name was Ashley. When asked why his mom called him Ashley, Grandma would pipe in: “She really wanted to call him Asshole!” Grandma never swore, and thus she said this very sparingly, which gave it massive impact.

*I only noticed this today: You can see Grandpa himself in this photo. That’s his giant belt buckle in the background. (When he wasn’t dressed as Santa, he was always in jeans, flannel shirts and a cowboy hat.)

*Details that come to mind when I think of Grandpa through the years: The way he’d belch and immediately say, “’Scuse the pig!” The way he would fall asleep sitting up in front of the television he constantly watched literally all night, and if you turned it off he would immediately wake up and say, “I was watching that!”

*And my favorite: Grandma’s ashes have been sitting inside a gift box on a shelf in Dad’s office for the past four and a half years, just waiting for Grandpa’s passing, so that their ashes can be joined for the scattering. Grandma actually stipulated that their ashes be scattered together at Twanoh State Park, on the southern shore of Hood Canal in South Puget Sound, during a full moon. Sherri always theorized this must mean they once had, uh, a “special time” at that park.

*So! There is a full moon on Friday, September 16, and that is when this is going to happen. Grandma and Grandpa were big on picnics. And cookies. An idea is taking hold that we all bake and bring way too many cookies, just like Grandma and Grandpa always had. I cannot tell you how much I love this idea, and how much I look forward to this day, which is shaping up to be way different from your standard memorial service. It’ll be a beautifully personalized sendoff for these two members of our family.
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And then there's this -- the video I made after Grandma's passing in October 2011. I realize this is very much from my own personal perspective and thus won't be anywhere near as interesting to anyone but me, but it does also prominently feature Grandpa. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnfPOeqLqvs
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Well, this update to Google+ has once again caused the app on my phone just to crash every time I open it. Although it's been a while, this is an issue I've had with Google+ many times before and I'm about to give up on this social media platform, which this time around feels like they're just giving me an excuse to do. In my day to day experience Google+ is nothing more than a redundancy anyway.
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1997: 21st birthday. I always exuded warmth.

#throwbackthursday 
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Holy shit!
"When I first came in, there were legislators who couldn't even look me in the eye or didn't want to shake my hand," the mayor-elect and former state lawmaker said.
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I have sent emails to representatives in the past but I have never made actual phone calls – until today: I called both of my senators’ local offices for the first time in my life. This Steve Bannon thing is just too important, and calls make by far the most difference.

Senator Patty Murray’s local office phone numbers can be found here: https://www.murray.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/contactme (drop down menu on the right for actual phone numbers). The man who answered the phone was very forthcoming, and assured me without prompting that the senator herself (not just a staffer, he said) sees the numbers of calls that come in about this very issue, and that they have received over 330 phone calls about it so far. He also directed me to a recent Facebook post she made (https://www.facebook.com/pattymurray/posts/10154767641923872) that I see now refers to him vaguely but not specifically.

Maria Cantwell’s local office phone numbers can be found here: https://www.cantwell.senate.gov/contact/locations. The man who answered this one did so after just one ring, which impressed me. He was slightly more vague about what Senator Cantwell plans to do about this – he literally said “I don’t know” more than once – but he said both that “she takes this very seriously” and, like Senator Cantwell’s staffer, assured me she would see the large numbers of calls coming in about this and would be happy to add my voice to the list. He even asked me what my zip code was, which I found kind of interesting.

Please. Do this as well, and make sure your representatives in Congress are opposing Steve Bannon. The man is widely known to be a white nationalist who is openly supported by the Ku Klux Klan (http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/15/opinion/turn-on-the-hate-steve-bannon-at-the-white-house.html?_r=0) and he has no place on the White House staff.
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I got some rather unsettling news last night. The attempted suicide of a family member. Today the first of three days in medical stabilization. I don't have a lot of detail beyond the most important detail -- that the attempt was not successful.

I'm not as close to this person as I could be. I don't know if I ever will be. Lives diverge, attitudes and beliefs -- these things ebb and flow. I am open to possibilities, some of which were reopened recently, and always have been. When I felt possibilities had been closed off, I simply accepted them. This is how I deal with life. We all have our own coping mechanisms and mine work for me.

The news still rattled me. For a brief moment, I actually felt a little like I wanted to throw up. I don't mean that snidely but literally. But consider the pain being experienced by closer family members. Spouse. Children. And this should never, ever be discounted: consider the pain being experienced by the one with years logged struggling with clinical depression.

There's a movie, a documentary from 2006, that I've mentioned before and am bound to mention again. It's called THE BRIDGE, and is about the Golden Gate Bridge as the most popular suicide destination in the world. It is the one movie I have ever seen in my life that literally changed what I previously thought to be a deeply held conviction. Before that movie, I was tethered to being judgmental against anyone who committed or attempted suicide. After that movie, I felt compassion for them, and realized that judgment helps no one.

I have never been clinically depressed, which makes genuine empathy difficult in this context. I've gained enough understanding, though, to know that depression isn’t a fucking joke. It's not something to be dismissed or scoffed at. It can be genuinely dangerous and it should be taken seriously. I have no solutions to offer -- I'm not a medical professional, and depression is a medical condition -- but I do think that considering it a force to be reckoned with is a step in the right direction.

Words matter. "A cry for help" is not the same as "trying to get attention." Sometimes a person is trying to escape what is perceived (rightly or wrongly) to be a truly hopeless situation, and it's just as simple as that. If there is any chance the rest of us can shed light on what hope there is, or perhaps even create some hope where previously there was none, then it's worth trying. This applies to doctors and medicine as much as friends and family.

Do I have a point here? I guess it's only that we should take pains to avoid making someone feel bad about their depression -- or any mental illness, for that matter. I have a remarkable (arguably rare) ability to lead a pleasantly experienced life, and even I still know that. It's not enough to tell someone who is depressed that they are loved, that they would leave behind a swath of emotional devastation in their wake if their suicide attempt succeeded. They must also be offered empathy for their pain, and if that's not possible, at the very least, understanding. Anger is not constructive here; only compassion. That's what we can work from.

That is my conviction now.

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Anyone who supports Donald Trump is a traitor to the American idea.​
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It's the last day of my thirties! And they were THE BEST. 
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This woman appeared on FOX News and it's my new favorite use of the American flag, equal parts patriotism and "fuck you".

The world needs to see more bold women like this, Muslim or otherwise.
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God damn it, I wanted to know how my weekend was going to be! 
With our latest addition to Google we try to experiment with fortune-telling. Based on your previous search results and your profile, we try to make a good prediction of your future.
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