Profile

Scrapbook photo 1
Scrapbook photo 2
Scrapbook photo 3
Scrapbook photo 4
Matt Harmon
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

Matt Harmon

Shared publicly  - 
 
The rest of the world finally feels the pain and suddenly, the mood shifts. +Andres Soolo, I think you will particularly apprciate the term patent monetization entities  used in the second to last paragraph.
A Senate bill introduced on Wednesday was aimed at slowing so-called patent trolls, companies whose principal business is generating suits rather than producing products.
1
Matt Harmon's profile photoAndres Soolo's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Matt Harmon: I think these would be parent monetisation entities.
Add a comment...

Matt Harmon

Shared publicly  - 
 
When first asked about the bicycle tickets, Tampa police directed inquiries to Capt. Ruben Delgado, who provided reporters with a strategy created a few years ago to encourage cyclists to register their bikes so officers could identify them if they were stolen.

He denied bicycle law was being used primarily to root out drugs or fight crime unrelated to bikes.

"We want to see the thefts of bicycles go down. We want to see the safety get better so there are less crashes," he said. "Whether it leads to something else or not is going to be secondary."

He said when officers find people in violation of bike law, they hand out lights and give warnings. Tickets, he said, are a last resort.

But the Times found that the department has ticketed hundreds of black bicyclists each year for more than a decade.

And the Times would be right. I know of no police agency, in any jurisdiction, that genuinely considers bike theft to be an issue so grave it justifies random stops of people riding bikes.
 
In case there was any doubt, here's more proof that racism is alive and well in the U.S.A. In Tampa, Florida, "proactive policing" (euphemism for racial profiling) is being used to detain black cyclists. Disgusting practices in sheep's clothing. Get it together, America. 
If the tickets are any indication, Tampa residents must be the lousiest bicyclists in Florida.
8 comments on original post
5
Add a comment...

Matt Harmon

Shared publicly  - 
 
One step forward, two steps back.
Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian, who was detained nine months ago in Iran, is facing four charges including espionage, his lawyer says.
1
Add a comment...

Matt Harmon

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
My review of the recent Steve Jobs bio:

"I adore the early Apple Computer that Brent and Rick belittle, so I'm writing this piece to defend it."
From my days at Apple, I knew Steve pretty well. Here’s my take on the Schlender-Tetzeli bio.
5 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Matt Harmon

Shared publicly  - 
 
h/t +Andres Soolo​ for awareness of the story.

In audio recordings of police radio calls, one officer can be heard saying White is hyperventilating after arriving at the scene, according to ABC affiliate WPVI-TV. Minutes later, the officer exclaims "He's grabbing my gun!" Another minute after that, the cop confirms White is "under apprehension."

Must be something in the water. Though we can't blame it on the region, this time.
New Jersey police allowed a K-9 to attack Phillip White, who was reportedly being disorderly. He was later declared dead at a local hospital.
1
Add a comment...

Matt Harmon

Shared publicly  - 
 
YasYas.

That's 30,000 people she laid off. People with families. And what does she say she would have done differently?

"I would have done them all faster."
- Carly Fiorina

And on top of that, her tenure at the company was one of the worst in its history. Complete with unlawful surveillance of journalists and much evidence of her own insecurity.

Lean in and all that I guess.
1
Add a comment...

Matt Harmon

Shared publicly  - 
 
Well. For a long time, factory floor automation was discouraged - for reasons that should be obvious - by the Chinese government. According to some of the reading on this, an aging migrant worker population - which urban factories relied on for inexpensive labor - now makes automation less sensitive.

And this trend highlights what I first discovered about 1998, when I saw my first entirely automated finished fabric inspection station: headcount in manufacturing is falling globally, not just in the US. China's manufacturing headcount gains were more about having so much more manufacturing go there than bad (for the US worker) trade deals. Now the country is moving up the productivity curve, just as the US did 30 years ago.

So the bite for workers in China now sets in. It's unclear to me what the PRC's leadership will do to stabilize the country domestically once zero labor factories (what we call "lights out facilities" in the US) become the norm.

For decades, since worker displacement due to technological deployments became a measurable problem, economists and those in industry have said that the deployments do not happen fast enough to displace workers so quickly that they cannot retrain and move up the value chain. If the argument is familiar, it's because it's the same one that one hears when trade liberalization is debated.

What happens in China over the next ten to fifteen years will test that theory.

In the US, which is one potential model for the PRC, headcount in manufacturing decreased while per capita value output increased significantly. The US produces more for export in dollar value than it ever did before, though with fewer workers than ever before. Highly skilled workers have gone into financial and technology service industries. Low skilled workers are moving to healthcare.

But even that requires a large enough low or no cost to the student educational system to absorb and retrain those workers.

I never thought I would see factory floor automation in China in my lifetime. Perhaps I should see if they need any PLC programmers. I think I still have my ladder logic textbook around here somewhere.
 
If they hadn't raised the minimum wage to $15... oh, wait, what?
Construction work has begun on the first factory in China’s manufacturing hub of Dongguan to use only robots for production, the official Xinhua news agency reported. ...
3 comments on original post
3
Add a comment...

Matt Harmon

Shared publicly  - 
 
In which the ridiculousness of our "justice" system is highlighted.
 
"The entire financial sector is tied jail term-wise with the economy's equally critical 'Real Housewives of New Jersey' sector -- oh, actually, they're behind 2 to 1." -- Jon Stewart

Watch the episode: http://on.cc.com/1HxDiW9
17 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Matt Harmon

Shared publicly  - 
1

Matt Harmon

Shared publicly  - 
 
The moment you've all been waiting for, ladies and gentlemen -- Iran's walking away from the table! They almost had you this time, didn't they? Well, it sure was a magnificent run. Well played, guys, well played.

It probably isn't the end. But it sure is looking like they still don't have their stuff together.
1
Add a comment...

Matt Harmon

Shared publicly  - 
 
"The Throwdown" by Tom Curtis from the August 1979 edition of The Texas Monthly

Houston police said they shot Randy Webster because he pointed a gun at them. Randy’s father set out to prove they were lying.

Someone asked me about the term "throwdown" which has been in documented use (as this example demonstrates) since at least 1977, which is when Webster was shot by Houston police.
books.google.com - Since 1973, TEXAS MONTHLY has chronicled life in contemporary Texas, reporting on vital issues such as politics, the environment, industry, and education. A...
1
Add a comment...
Story
Bragging rights
I ride my bike to work five days a week (6.2 miles each way). I still use my BA in English from time to time.
Links
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Looking for
Friends, Networking