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Matt Harmon
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Matt Harmon

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Presumably, this means that commenting on a Youtube video in Google+ will not result in a comment showing up in Youtube...
 
Everything in Its Right Place

It’s been a little more than a quarter since I took on leadership of a newly formed team, which we’ve christened SPS: Streams, Photos, and Sharing.

In that short time, I’ve had some time to reflect on the products we’ve built over the last few years, and also the opportunity to oversee the launch of our new Google Photos product. I’ve concluded that it’s time for a “pivot”... or more precisely time to talk more openly about a pivot that’s been underway for some time (and in fact is reflected in the name of the new team). We're going to continue focusing Google+ on helping users connect around the interest they love, and retire it as the mechanism by which people share and engage within other Google products.

Four years ago when we conceived of the “Google+ Project”, we made it clear that our goals were always two-fold: Google+ aspired to be both a “platform layer that unified Google’s sharing models”, and a product / stream / app in its own right.

This was a well-intentioned goal, but as realized it led to some product experiences that users sometimes found confusing. For instance, and perhaps most controversially, integration with YouTube implied that leaving a comment on YouTube (something users had obviously been doing successfully for years) suddenly and unexpectedly required “joining Google+.”

We decided it’s time to fix this, not only in YouTube, but across a user’s entire experience at Google. We want to formally retire the notion that a Google+ membership is required for anything at Google… other than using Google+ itself.  

Some of the consequences of this shift in thinking have already been deployed. Others we’re rolling out as fast as possible (e.g. the changes to YouTube we referenced today). And many more will roll out over the rest of the year.

What does this mean for Google+ the product? Relieved of the notion of integrating with every other product at Google, Google+ can now focus on doing what it’s already doing quite well: helping millions of users around the world connect around the interest they love. Aspects of the product that don’t serve this agenda have been, or will be, retired. But you’ll also see a slew of improvements that make this use case shine (like the recent launch of Collections - https://plus.google.com/collections/featured).

It’s been incredibly gratifying to see how this strategy has played out as realized in the recent Google Photos launch, a product which in many ways embodies and telegraphs the changes discussed above. Google Photos not only doesn’t require a Google+ account, but as much of the functionality as possible doesn’t even require an account at all. It was important to me that when we launched Google Photos, we stressed the product implements sharing by any means a user prefers… without compromise or agenda. This is the right thing for users and the feedback and usage has been extremely validating.

I’m excited to share this strategy with the world, excited about what it means for Google+, and most of all for all of Google’s users.
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I made the mistake of sharing videos publicly which means they're available for all the "blue head" trolls on Youtube to comment on and thus end up in my G+ stream with all of their childish, boorish, b.s. I've taken to posting any video I want to share as visible ONLY to my circles so as not to have any comments of mine or reference to the video be on Youtube in a public manner, thus not opening to flood gates to the aforementioned trolls.
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Yeah. Mostly. But the sport has big, big problems. Too much money, too wide a gulf between what winning and second place mean.

And yes, Armstong remains a pretty dubious individual.
LES BLAYES, France — In his biography, Chris Froome recounts how his two elder brothers used to amuse themselves by locking him in a dog kennel with an angry, scratching turkey. "Only when I was in absolute floods of tears...
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Matt Harmon

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Kiss kiss!!
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+Matt Harmon thanks Matt appreciate that
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He said slogans of "Death to America" and "Death to Israel" chanted at demonstrations in Iran this week supporting the Palestinian cause showed what Iranians think and "shook the atmosphere of the country".

[...]

"We have repeatedly said we don't negotiate with the U.S. on regional or international affairs; not even on bilateral issues. There are some exceptions like the nuclear program that we negotiated with Americans to serve our interests ... U.S. policies in the region are diametrically opposed with Iran’s policies."

So, clearly not the end of "Death to America" but the beginning of a new era of ideological contortions in which they try to pretend they did not literally shake hands with the "Great Satan."

Yeah. I think we all know this thing isn't changing until his generation has served its term. (And possibly until the one after it has, as well.)
Iranian opposition to the "arrogant" United States will not change despite a nuclear deal with world powers, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said on Saturday, adding Tehran remains
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Matt Harmon

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And here we go....
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Well, it looks like the Iranian negotiators finally got over their problems with the color of John Kerry's shoes and the size of the negotiating table. Let's see if it survives the Supreme Leader's scrutiny. And then let's see if the Iranian political system survives a challenge from its conservatives (which we know is coming, since the generation already put into place to succeed this one is even more hard line).

"At least the tourism industry will be boosted since Iran is no longer an outlaw regime in the international community," said Siamak, a tour guide in Tehran who, along with some other people interviewed, asked that his full name not be given when discussing the deal reached by the government.

Uh, not likely, since Europeans (or really anyone) can't rest assured that they would be allowed to return once they've arrived. Certainly, even after hell freezes over and the US government allows travel to Iran for tourism, most Americans won't come. They wouldn't want to be detained as hostages....And clearly Siamak is worried about this happening to him, too, since he didn't give his last name.

Vahidreza Haqparast, 38, remained skeptical about the agreement, which limits Iran's nuclear program in exchange for easing economic sanctions. For more than a decade, he said, Iranian leaders told the public that the international restrictions facing their country "meant nothing" and were worth "less than shredded paper." Now, he said, the leadership has changed its tune.

"Have I been told lies for the past 12 years?" he asked.  "I never cared about nuclear energy, but was told that we gave so much for this."

Uh...If you have to ask the question...But yes, they did and they will continue to, because that's what fundamentalists do. I guess they haven't gotten to Irving Kristol yet...Who in that moment of candor admitted that political elites on the right agree that:

“There are different kinds of truths for different kinds of people. There are truths appropriate for children; truths that are appropriate for students; truths that are appropriate for educated adults; and truths that are appropriate for highly educated adults, and the notion that there should be one set of truths available to everyone is a modern democratic fallacy. It doesn’t work.”

And who suggested that modern conservatives must make use of religion as a means of imposing social discipline:

Kristol and his colleagues may worry that once this one thread is pulled from the fabric of religious belief, perhaps the whole will become unraveled, with grave social consequences. Without the strictures and traditions imposed by a religion that promises to punish sinners, the moral controls that moderate our base desires will lose their validity, leading ultimately to moral chaos. Ironically, today many modern conservatives fervently agree with Karl Marx that religion is "the opium of the people"; they add a heartfelt, "Thank God!" from http://reason.com/archives/1997/07/01/origin-of-the-specious

How odd to think that the political and social philosophy adopted by hard line Iranian clerics is essentially the work of Leo Strauss (a son of Abraham) put into practice.

I doubt this will lead to further engagement with the US. In fact, when the conservatives come back (they always do) it will become a point of contention and something that must be fought, as the ACA is in the US, tooth and nail by all good conservatives. After all, the US will not drop its support of Israel. Ever.

And apparently, the treaty is already something of a sensitive issue, since only "hundreds" of people came out.
Hundreds of Iranians poured into Tehran’s streets on Tuesday night, waving flags and honking their horns to celebrate a nuclear agreement between their nation and six world powers.
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Matt Harmon

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A hummingbird has taken up residence conveniently in front of a building cam in the University of Arizona campus.
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+Matt Harmon This is so cool!   A live broadcast!
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Abdulazeez, an engineer, wrote about having suicidal thoughts and "becoming a martyr" as far back as 2013 after losing his job due to drug use, both prescription and non-prescription, the family representative told ABC News.

Depression, easy access to guns and a convenient ideological framework to justify what one is about to do.

The root causes are almost always mental health issues (an individual somewhere on the depression spectrum)...But they become public security issues when they are not addressed and whatever ideological framework suggests the problem is outside rather than inside (in this case, IS...In the previous case, white supremacy).
The man suspected of killing five members of the U.S. military in Tennessee last week was in Qatar at least once during a 2014 trip to the Middle East, according to two U.S. government sources who
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Onyx: Thanks for the foods Oreo.
Oreo: Eat up Onyx and then I’ll teach you how to make Monday faces like this…
Onyx: I don’t do Mondays
Oreo: Honestly, kids these days…

#MondayMemories #catlogic #theoreocat #cats #catsofgoogle #catsofgoogleplus #tuxedocat #monday
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Matt Harmon

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Mister @delmontecanada, I am the sunshine of your life!
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Cat  looks like a muppet.
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