Profile

Cover photo
Matt Gage
Works at Piksel
Attended Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Lives in San Diego, CA
107 followers|227,347 views
AboutPostsPhotos

Stream

Matt Gage

Shared publicly  - 
1
Stephanie Schnack's profile photo
 
Such a creepy little hand! Nicely done, makes me want to carve an orange.
Add a comment...

Matt Gage

Shared publicly  - 
1
Stephanie Schnack's profile photo
 
More power tools! I think Jen needs a dremel. Ooo, and maybe a laser cutter.
Add a comment...

Matt Gage

Shared publicly  - 
 
Ahmed Zeeshan originally shared:
 
Circles: Dividing, Nesting and Prioritizing

There have been many articles and posts explaining the use and power of circles but there haven't been any decent and practical examples to demonstrate that. Therefore, inspired by the excellent ideas of +Chris Cho and +Jacqueline Passey Mason, I've reorganized, prioritized and nested my circles. This is to show you the true potential of circles.

First, we need to understand that a Google+ Circle has two main functions, sharing and streaming:

Sharing (output): This is content that you publish. Depending on your real-life relationship with your contacts, the information you share will not be the same for your different social circles. At the same time, your social circles may overlap. This means one person may be a part of two different circles at the same time.

Streaming (input): This is content that your contacts stream to your Google+ homepage. Streaming is different from sharing in the sense that streams depend more on your interests rather than your relationships.

Hence, to achieve more control over your circles, I believe it is necessary to divide them between sharing and streaming.

Since, my sharing circles can overlap, I decided to further nest and prioritize them based on my real-life relationships with the people in my contacts list. On the other hand, my streaming circles are interest based. Hence, they're sub-divided by interests and do not necessarily need nesting.

Now, to achieve all this in Google+ is simple. Here is how I did it:

Sharing Circles
1: Friends
1.1: Close
1.2: College
1.3: High School
1.4: Others

2: Family
2.1: Favorites
2.2: Immediate
2.3: Extended

3: Work
3.1: Department
3.2: Colleagues
3.3: Clients

4: The Internet
4.1: Added Me
4.2: Google+
4.3: Influential
4.4: Who?

Streaming Circles
s: Google+
s: Android
s: Influential
s: Movies
s: Tech Talk


This arrangement now makes my sharing and streaming a lot easier to manage:

- If I want to send out information I will only use the sharing circles. If I want to share with my College and Close friends, but not my High school friends, then I will tag 1.1, 1.2 but not 1.3. If I want to share with all my friends I will just tag 1 because it contains everyone from 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 and 1.4.

- Similarly, if I want to know what my contacts are saying about Android, I will click on the s: Android streaming circle in my stream. If I want to know what my Family has been upto, I will click on the s: Family circle and so on.

Using this method will give you all more control with how you share and view information on Google+. While other social networking sites have also offered similar subdivision of contacts, they are by no means as easy and simple to use as on Google+.

I have also attached a screenshot to show how the prioritizing and nesting looks on Google+.

**********************
Helpful Feedback

+Alma Whitten (regarding nesting automation): If you want Circle A to contain Circle B, it's easy to select all of Circle B and drag it into Circle A, and since it de-dups you can do this kind of mindlessly to keep it fresh. What you can't do is define Circle A as containing Circle B so that if you remove someone from Circle A they're automatically removed from Circle B. So far I'm finding that okay though because when I'm removing someone it tends to be person-centric and it's easy enough to manually remove them from both.

(an empty circle for note-taking): This idea has been widely publicized on Google+ so far. The concept is simple where you can use an empty circle to save any ideas/bookmarks/draft-shares/pictures/posts for easy access later as per your convenience.

**********************
1
Matt Gage's profile photoDonnie McNeal's profile photo
3 comments
 
ahh... I see. It would be cool if they had sub circles though... google you listening?
Add a comment...

Matt Gage

Shared publicly  - 
 
Christina Trapolino originally shared:
 
Google+ Tip for the day: Stop treating Google+ like Facebook.

When I got my Google+ invitation, I was already itching to shed my Facebook profile. I still feel that way, but I’m starting to realize something really surprising (at least for me): I don’t think Google is my Facebook stand-in. I think Google is far more than a measly “social network,” and that’s why some of my Facebook friends who are migrating over right now seem to be, as they say on the Internet, “doing it wrong.”

I've been a devoted Googlephile for many years, so if Google wanted me to use G+ instead of Facebook, it was gonna happen -- unless they really goofed it up, of course (I'm still not entirely over my breakup with Wave, Google -- but at least I've stopped leaving those creepy voicemails, right?). The push and pull factors were there. They were obvious: Facebook is for “moms” and spam robots -- Google was going to be my new social network.

But something didn't feel quite right about treating my Google+ profile like my Facebook profile, nor treating my Circles like the Facebook social groups I wished I'd always had. There was content everywhere, written by people I’d heard of -- and many I hadn’t. Something about this space was very different than anything Facebook has ever allowed me to experience. It felt like something else, something... bigger, maybe more important. Something collaborative, perhaps. How very Google!

My friends, however, don’t seem to be having the same Google+ experience I am. My tendency so far has been to add as many people with as many interesting views as possible to my Circles, and then to read voraciously and respond all over the place. Meanwhile, my real-life friends are complaining that there’s not enough content to appease them, and I’m the only one dominating their Streams. Why is this happening for them? I think it comes from a fundamental set of expectations about moving from Facebook to Google+. People are treating their Google+ accounts just like Facebook accounts. And I think that’s a doomed approach.

Here is how I think Google+ can be most fully enjoyed and utilized, at this early stage:

Think about what you use Facebook for. If it’s for keeping up with old friends and for keeping up with current, local friends, great. You can use Google+ for that, and it’s definitely got a leg up on Facebook for filtering content.

Interact with content created by users you don’t know personally. If you don’t follow people you don’t already know, you’re going to get bored, and not just because your friends aren’t all here yet. You’ll get bored even after they’ve all arrived. Why do you think Facebook started implementing games and applications? Well, to make money, obviously, but what was the draw for the userbase? I’m willing to bet Facebook figured out that simply reading your friends’ thoughts all day long gets old, and let’s be honest: very few of us have enough friends with enough interesting posts to keep us engaged.

If you like the social games on Facebook, well...you’re not really my target audience. Sorry. For the rest of you -- if you don’t like how Facebook allowed third party junk to start bombarding you with game requests and access to your information, embrace its absence here so far!

I realize that at some point, developers may come up with cool ways to implement games on Google+, but I expect that Google will have learned from the clunky, disorganized, and downright invasive way developers approached this in Facebook. And the best way to keep Google+ rich in content and devoid of lame, invasive apps is to let go of your old ideas about what it means to be on a social network.
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
107 people
Sonny Pham's profile photo
Brian Hill's profile photo
Dean Hart's profile photo
Chris Meadows's profile photo
Donnie McNeal's profile photo
Barbara Newton's profile photo

Matt Gage

Shared publicly  - 
1
Stephanie Schnack's profile photo
 
Aw, Jen can not help but be ambitious when she has such cute to produce. Hard core cute.
Add a comment...

Matt Gage

Shared publicly  - 
 
After reading though this long presentation, it convinced me that the default "Friends" and "Family" circles Google+ set up for you are meaningless. I've since deleted those two circles and now only create circles based off interests or topics.
1
Add a comment...

Matt Gage

Shared publicly  - 
 
Google+ for iPhone
1
1
Matt Gage's profile photoChanga Damany Imara's profile photo
3 comments
 
Ah. Thanks for the 411 on Huddles. 
Add a comment...

Matt Gage

Shared publicly  - 
 
Vincent Mo originally shared:
 
Many of you have asked for this, and now it's here!

Now, when you disable resharing (from the arrow at the top corner of your post), it also disables +mentions. That way, you can really clamp down on who's allowed to see the post.

There were reasons why we originally allowed +mentions even when sharing was disabled, but your feedback convinced our team to change that. Keep sending feedback! We're listening.

Let me tell you, sometimes it's hard to answer your feature requests without giving away the fact that we're already working on them. =)

#googleplustips
1
Add a comment...

Matt Gage changed his profile photo.

Shared publicly  - 
 
Matt Gage changed his profile photo.
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
107 people
Sonny Pham's profile photo
Brian Hill's profile photo
Dean Hart's profile photo
Chris Meadows's profile photo
Donnie McNeal's profile photo
Barbara Newton's profile photo
Education
  • Worcester Polytechnic Institute
    Computer Science, 2000 - 2004
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Work
Occupation
Technical Lead
Skills
Web Development
Employment
  • Piksel
    Technical Lead, 2010 - present
  • IFX Online
    Web Developer, 2006 - 2010
  • Titan - an L-3 Communicatons Company
    Computer Scientist, 2004 - 2006
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
San Diego, CA
Previously
Haverhill, MA - Lexington Park, MD - Worcester, MA
Links
YouTube
Other profiles
Contributor to