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Matt Crain
148 followers -
Software Engineer, Gamer, Tech Enthusiast
Software Engineer, Gamer, Tech Enthusiast

148 followers
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Free and unlimited is what we claim and that's what the system I worked on has to support. Looking forward to the enormous firehose of data that's coming my way.
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I seemingly won the lottery because my high school had a CS program 10 years ago. I don't want kids to have to win the lottery to have relevant courses that can improve their ability to succeed in the world.
I just signed this Change.org petition asking the US. Congress to fund computer science education in every K-12 school, and I urge you to consider signing it as well.

I signed it, and added the following comments:

I am a computer scientist. I believe strongly in the ability of computing to change the world, and also that every person, regardless of their school, socioeconomic background, or other factors should have the opportunity to be exposed to computer science and computational thinking. Our field needs a diversity of opinions and backgrounds, and our world will be a better place when more people understand the power and capabilities of computing.

Exposing all students to computer science at an early enough age will go a long way to ensuring that the field of computer science reflects the diversity of the world's people.
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I'm still amazed that this is happening. I remember my AI textbook claiming it would take about another 100 years before computers could play Go competitively. This was assuming a similar approach to what they use when playing chess and Moore's law for exponential computing capacity. They obviously had no idea what advances in machine learning were just down the road.

Can't wait to see what happens.

#GoAlphaGo
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I generally avoid much political kerfuffle, but this one seems like it deserves attention. The people trying to make these policies don't understand the underlying technology nor the implications of what they're trying to impose on it. We already have enough information leaks without weakening the core of our digital information security.

Imposing these encryption backdoors on companies won't yield information about the criminals these policies intend/claim to. Strong encryption technology exists already, and criminals can simply use their own encryption procedures which ignores these mandates. If encryption is weakened, all we'll have done is lost privacy to the vast majority of our law abiding citizens.

Providing backdoors into physical locks didn't work too well (http://www.wired.com/2015/09/lockpickers-3-d-print-tsa-luggage-keys-leaked-photos/). Doing the same thing with our digital locks won't either.
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Seeing the various scenarios the driverless car can handle is quite impressive.  Keep up the fantastic work +Chris Urmson.  I'd like to be able to bike one day knowing that cars will reliably respect my existence.
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Originally shared by ****
"What Google’s doing, in these cases, is using its deep pockets in the interest of broader social ends, with seemingly little concern for short-term returns. This strategy has historical precedent. In the early years of the American republic, there was little appetite for government spending on public works, like roads and canals. But the country needed better roads to facilitate the growth of trade and commerce. So the states turned to private companies, which built turnpikes that they then operated as toll roads. In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, hundreds of these companies invested millions of dollars in laying thousands of miles of road, in effect providing the basic infrastructure for travel in the United States.

What’s interesting about these companies is that while they were, in theory, for-profit, and while they had shareholders, in most cases there was no expectation that they would actually turn a profit in operating the roads—tolls were kept low enough to encourage traffic and commerce. Instead, the shareholders—who were typically local merchants and manufacturers—saw their investments in turnpikes as a way to collectively provide a public good that, not incidentally, would also deliver benefits to them as business owners and consumers. They knew, of course, that other businesses would benefit from these roads even if they didn’t invest in them (the nature of a public good being that everyone can use it). But that didn’t mean the investment wasn’t worth making. It’s hard not to see a similar logic underlying much of what Google does"

h/t +Chris Jones
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The day I spent wandering around SF. The Fit app claims I cracked 16 miles. The photos are mostly from the lovely Golden Gate Park area.
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Can't wait to see them driving around.
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Amazing detail of my favorite planet.
Europa / Jupiter, by NASA Voyager. (credit: NASA/Kinetikon Pictures) via +reddit.
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Amazing innovation in bee keeping. Sounds boring, actually awesome. They basically reduced the process to the bare minimum amount of required effort while improving both the bee keepers' and the bees' well being.
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