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Mathieu Comandon
568 followers -
I code using Open Source technologies and cook Burritos. Alpacas and capybaras rock my house.
I code using Open Source technologies and cook Burritos. Alpacas and capybaras rock my house.

568 followers
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#rtotd or rather rtotn, you may have heard this one in a Linux game, Osmos
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Yes! Gimme!
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First time I make it to second place on Fortnite, and it was while running the game on the TV, playing with a joypad. Just was lucky and sneaky, didn't manage to make a kill with the controller yet XD

Also tested in-game voice chat and it works beautifully! So far zero complaints with running Fortnite on Linux, hope it stays that way.
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If you ever wondered what Black Metal is, this is what Black Metal is. #rtotd
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Songs your mind wakes up to #rtotd
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Talk from Keith Packard at DebConf 18 about getting good support for games on Debian and Linux in general
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Cool. #rtotd

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Linus and Wendell release a gaming on Linux video… which was both very enjoyable but also concerning.
They start off by stating that the overall state of gaming on Linux has improved over the years, that the drivers (both Nvidia and AMD) are pretty good and all the usual business.
But then they go on to show some actual games running on Linux and this is where it gets interesting. Of all the games that could have been shown, they go with The Witcher 3, running with Lutris/Wine/DXVK. This might come as a surprise, but only if you haven't been paying attention to the Linux gaming world lately. I would have preferred if they had shown some of Feral's amazing work on Rise of the Tomb Raider before going straight for The Witcher 3 or maybe go with… wait that's the only game from a big studio that we've got this year!

This video made some Linux gamers angry, but there was nothing wrong with the video itself, it just puts them in a position where they have to face reality and be confronted by a Windows gamer to what is the gaming industry on Linux today.

Trust me on this one, I'd rather not be in a position where my software is the 1st thing used to demo a game on Linux in 2018 on a general tech channel. Over the past few years, we have lost support from huge publishers such as 2K Games, Warner Games, CD Projekt Red… I would add THQ Nordic to the list but they've recently released Desperados, so yay for an 18 year old game I guess? (Where are the Darksiders ports, THQ?).
The problem now is that we have very good tech: Mesa, Nvidia drivers, Vulkan… and engine support has gone way better: UE4 runs okay (no thanks to Epic), Unity games now run great and look amazing but also, we lost the trust of most major publishers that where willing to experiment with Linux (which was a risky bet to begin with).
Not sure there is anyone to blame, should we blame Valve for messing up the commercial release of Steam machines? Should we blame the technology for being to immature in 2012? Should we blame the community for being immature as well and make companies like CD Projekt completely lose interest in the market?
I don't believe that blaming anyone will get us anywhere, we just have to admit that the industry itself is at a weak point while the tech has never been this good.

Here we are today, with DXVK being the best piece of software released this year, filling the gaps of a deserted gaming land. I believe that tools like this one are what may one day revive the industry. Why? Because Linux needs users to gain the interest and trust of publishers back. The fear that if Wine games run so well on Linux then why bother making a native port is nonsense. Whenever there's a sizable user base, there's a native port, just look at the console market, those are completely different architecture and yet they get ports. Porting games to Linux has never been a technical issue, if a publisher gives the green flag there will be a port (whether it's a good port or not is a whole different matter), case where a port couldn't be finished because of technical issues are extremely rare.

The last Linux gaming boom was with the release of Steam and thus was dependent on Valve handling the situation well, which they did not, preferring to focus on more important things like VR headsets and not making 3rd games in a series. The next Linux gaming boom will be caused by a sheer number of users on the platform along with high quality tech. People can post "no tux no bucks" all day long in comment sections, it doesn't make our software ecosystem better, plus it's not putting any pressure on any game publisher since it's pretty clear that we're not an interesting segment to them already.
Right now, we do need to accept that native ports (or I'd rather just say native games, I'd rather not have 'ports') are going to be fewer for a while. But at the same time, we should not be limited in what games we can play. The Linux environment is extremely powerful and we should make use of that power, and improve it.
Videos like this one are showing that we are indeed gaining traction and it might not be long before Linux becomes a viable platform for publishers!
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