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The patient — who can now chew and speak with ease — suffered from a chronic bone infection. Doctors were worried that at her age, reconstructive surgery could have caused complications.

The 3D-printed jawbone, which is made of titanium powder, was heated and infused together in layers. Once the design was created, it took only a few hours to print. The new jaw weighs slightly more than the previous one.

Do you think 3D printing of body parts will become increasingly popular in the future? What do you think about the concept?
An 83-year-old British woman is the recipient of the first-ever jaw replacement printed in 3D.
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Impressive! Can't wait to see where 3D printings brings up.

IRL Replicator?
In the near future plastic surgeon will print on you the face you want to have... hmmm today I feel that I would like to look like...
Amaaazing!! I suppose depending upon the materials used to print there could be an application in nanotech? If you could converge this and a standard device you could print your paper simultaneously to printing your text and avoid every having to lugg boxes of paper around again...
They printed a jawbone from a 3D printer. That's way beyond what my brain can process. I couldn't even begin to give an honest critique of the concept or how it will pan out.
Sure this is just the start of the advantages of 3D printing. A friend who is a maxillofacial surgeon has been talking about a number of practical uses for a while. Interesting times.
Jason F
3D Printer FTW!
I love technology! 3D printing for the win!
I'm all for it. I've had two shoulder reconstructions and a bone graft.
And the singularity draws closer...
Saw the TED talk about 3D printing a kidney...that's what i need them to hurry up with!
That's good news!
Karen M
I had cadaver bone placed in my jaw. That made me more squeamish than the idea of this.
This is only the beginning...
After do some study on 3d printing and understand how it is done on a small scale and large. I believe that this will in fact be the way for most bone replacement to be done. With laser scanner that can map the complete object then send that information to the printer, you will have an exact match each time. By the way you can make your own 3d printer at home, just do a search and see!
Like I said it for all the sciences start all over again.
Just think they could've printed out a nice full set of teeth for her at the same time.
Sooo neat, I wish I was teaching ITGS again, this is exactly what gets the students so into that class...if only IB had not saddled it with irrelevant nonsense.
I want to use this technique to gradually replace all of my bones with titanium. There are only 2 downsides that I can see:

1. I would gain some weight. A human skeleton is, by weight, half water and half calcium. Water has a density of 1 gram/cubic cm and Calcium 1.55 grams/cubic cm which averages out to 1.28 grams/cubic cm. Titanium has a density of 4.51 grams/cubic cm which is about 3.54 times as dense. The average human skeleton is roughly 20 lbs. So I would gain at least 50 lbs. probably more since some bones are spongy.

2. Without bone marrow I would die.
considering viagara and cialis, I suspect it won't be the face that gets constructed out of titanium.
This technique, and spinoffs yet to be developed, definitely will have a future.
Well, certainly, this tech is real good for everything, but, probably just can benefit the rich people.
I'm built with and held together by Titanium hip parts. Both hips. I'm a member of Titanium Club. The first rule of Titanium Club is we do not speak on Titanium Club. Ever again.
Incredible how far we've come with technology!
Just one more example of how technology and science betters the life of people ...
Sounds fantastic. If Jay Leno can have a custom motorcycle part made for him, why not bone replacements? Imagine people who have irreparably broken an arm or leg bone, or even delicate hand bones, being able to regain their faculties, versus amputation or being crippled..
I like the use of titanium alloys, are t
Wonderful - I wonder if they can work on other parts of the skull..I have two extra holes in my upper parietals LOL The bone regrew, of course, but they sometimes feel like wee horns!
I have to say something about it.But when we will find about it?.I'm full of work.
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