Profile

Cover photo
Martin Watson
Attended University Of Technology
7,602 followers|2,389,171 views
AboutPosts

Stream

 
Tell me, can you wait a whole year?

YOU WILL!!

I know I'm a day late, but ^&$% &^^@ #%# ^$# !!!  Yes, I ran out of words that can accurately describe how I feel.
1
Add a comment...

Martin Watson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Join me. Tell Congress that it's time to end the NSA's unconstitutional mass surveillance under the Patriot Act. https://fight215.org
3
Add a comment...

Martin Watson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Low maintenance people have a lot going for them.
Discover the real world of low maintenance people who are often overlooked. High maintenance people get all the attention which they do not really deserve.
View original post
4
1
Jeremy Bray's profile photo
Add a comment...

Martin Watson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
L+141-144: Logbook

Well, as you might have heard, Dragon’s arrival has been delayed a few days. Had the launch occurred on Monday, it would already be berthed to Node 2 right now and we would already have opened the hatch and started to get urgent cargo out.

But hey, in the space business flexibility is paramount! The launch slipped by one day, delaying arrival to ISS by two days… that’s orbital mechanics and phasing angles for you.

But if you think that we had two free days while waiting for Dragon to come knock at our door, I’m afraid you’re not acquainted with the folks who run the ISS ops: they always have a slip plan! A launch is delayed? Voila’, old plan is taken out, new plan is put in. Ready? Go! Yes, whenever things heavily depend on an inherently uncertain event like the launch of a rocket, mission managers, flight directors and planners always fully prepare two plans: that requires a lot of extra work on the ground, but it ensures that no precious crew time on ISS is wasted.

In this case they had pretty major plans in store for the case of launch slip. I kind of got that feeling on Tuesday already: when they give you one full hour to study a procedure you’ll do the next day and then they give you another hour to gather hardware you will need for that procedure and then they tell you not to bother taking tools out of the toolbox, just take the entire drawer instead… when all that happens you start to think that you’re going to get your hands dirty on some major work. Which I love!

While Terry and Scott were busy on their own major activity with the EVA suits, I spent the day in Node 3 reconfiguring the intermodule ventilation ducting in preparation of moving the PMM module later this year from Node 1 nadir to Node 3 forward. Basically, we need a way to get ventilation to PMM in its future new location. Never thought if would be possible to fit so many bags full of hardware in Node 3, in the pretty cramped space between ARED and the toilet cabin, but somehow it worked. And at 2 am Houston-time specialists on the ground were ready to support, with a ground model of the equipment to replicate any issues had we run into problems. Fortunately, with the exception of a couple of stuck fasteners , everything went smoothly: kudos to the team for having such a great, user-friendly procedure ready!

Dragon slip also carved some time to work on the European Modular Cultivation System in Columbus. I got to de-install a number of modules called Rotor Based Life Support Systems –self-contained boxes that are attached on the rotors of this facility. They will hitch a ride to Earth on Dragon and they will be refurbished and launched again in the future to support future plant experiments.

Ah, I also worked a little on a Kubik, the stand-alone centrifuge/incubators that we sometimes operate in Columbus for experiments on cell cultures. I wrapped up the experiment Stem Cells Differentiation by moving the experiment containers to cold stowage and downlinking Kubik data to the ground. As the name suggests, this experiment studies human mesenchymal stem cells, which can differentiate into several cell types to build bone, fat, cartilage, musles, tendons. Now, if you’re a stem cell and you have all this choice, how do you know into what you need to differentiate? What are going to be when you “grow up”? That depends on what kind of signals you get from so-called signaling molecules. Vitamin-D is one of those signaling molecules and in particular we know that it is involved in telling stem cells to turn into bone cells. Bone loss is a big issue in microgravity, as you know, so this experiment observes the effectiveness of the Vitamin D signaling by comparing stem cells differentiation in presence or absence of Vitamin D. Pretty cool, ah?

By the way, not sure how much sunlight you get where you live (we don’t get much up here), but if you haven’t done so already and get a chance, at your next blood draw it can’t hurt to check you Vitamin D levels!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

  #SamLogbook +futura42 

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS 
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio 
aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
 
 
37 comments on original post
3
Add a comment...

Martin Watson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
I am not really crazy about this idea.. but I figure if I don't try, then I didn't try hard enough. If you can't help, share, if you can't share but read why I am asking, THANK YOU. 
#cancersucks  
As many of you know, the last three years have been one medical issue after another.  Diagnosed with endometriosis, adenomyosis, intersistual cystistis, hip burtitis, arthritis in lower lumbar, and then the newest addition. Ned. Ned is what I have named the small Adenocarcinoma tumor in my small...
24 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Martin Watson

Shared publicly  - 
 
via +CyberPunk 
 
Watercooled Computer (Corsair Air 240)
1 comment on original post
5
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
7,602 people
Yandile Manana's profile photo
green light's profile photo
Luis Valdes's profile photo
Leneia Weston O'Hara's profile photo
JeffTheWatchman's profile photo
Jenn Miller's profile photo
Peter Anderson's profile photo
SHARIQUE SRQ's profile photo
akhilesh singh's profile photo
 
Break links and you break the Internet. Help us save these critical building blocks of the web.
5
2
Matthew Strain (Matt)'s profile photoAlex “Styromaniac” Goven's profile photo
Add a comment...

Martin Watson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Spring is here! Don't forget to get some fresh air over the weekend. ;-)
22 comments on original post
10
Add a comment...

Martin Watson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Guess what these are?

Image © CERN - for terms of use see http://cern.ch/copyright

(Answer will be posted on Monday.)
36 comments on original post
3
Add a comment...

Martin Watson

Shared publicly  - 
17
2
tina narak's profile photoIvan Ramos's profile photoEddie Dexter Stewart's profile photo
 
hahaha I like this ^__^
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
7,602 people
Yandile Manana's profile photo
green light's profile photo
Luis Valdes's profile photo
Leneia Weston O'Hara's profile photo
JeffTheWatchman's profile photo
Jenn Miller's profile photo
Peter Anderson's profile photo
SHARIQUE SRQ's profile photo
akhilesh singh's profile photo
Education
  • University Of Technology
    Enterprise Computing, 2010
Story
Tagline
Stranded on the wrong planet
Introduction
Martin is a defective sentient being with humanoid form that was not assessed by quality control officers at the sentient life manufacturing facility.  As a result, he is an over observative, over thinking, extremely awkward non-human humanoid citizen of the Multiverses with a severe chronic allergy to reality and sports and is also prone to panicking in social situations.
Bragging rights
I was not born. I was manufactured.
Basic Information
Other names
ReplicantX3R0, Martin JM Watson, RX3R0, ReplicantZERO