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Martin Pugh
472 followers -
The Network Guy, Scifi fan, reasonably good cook.
The Network Guy, Scifi fan, reasonably good cook.

472 followers
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Why brain, why? Why do you insist on wanting to work at stupid o'clock in the morning just because you were randomly woken by a laptop that was playing a YouTube videos last night that was left on pause that decided to wake up at 1am.
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3:45. Body clock, we need to have a word... Oh, you woke me up because you knew I'd forgotten to turn the radio alarm on for the morning. Well that's ok then. So why am I still awake half an hour later? Because of the internet, that's why. Oh, and because I still haven't got out of bed to set the alarm. I'm doing it now already.....

Edit: 4:50 and still awake. It's going to be a long ass day.
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Arrrgghhh, this stupid shoulder is driving me crazy. As soon as we're confirmed at the new doctors I'm heading in to get it checked out.
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Up and atem already on a bank holiday Monday. I must be mad.
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Getting the day off to a good start.
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I tell you what, just getting one application to work with two companies is a bloody challenge. We've tried three different apps a there's always someone that has a problem.
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You can't beat a great looking rocket launch photo.
TESS Launch Close Up
Image Credit & Copyright: John Kraus
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180421.html

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) began its search for planets orbiting other stars by leaving planet Earth on April 18. The exoplanet hunter rode to orbit on top of a Falcon 9 rocket. The Falcon 9 is so designated for its 9 Merlin first stage engines seen in this sound-activated camera close-up from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. In the coming weeks, TESS will use a series of thruster burns to boost it into a high-Earth, highly elliptical orbit. A lunar gravity assist maneuver will allow it to reach a previously untried stable orbit with half the orbital period of the Moon and a maximum distance from Earth of about 373,000 kilometers (232,000 miles). From there, TESS will carry out a two year survey to search for planets around the brightest and closest stars in the sky.
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The weekend ritual begins.
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And we're off... It's house move day. First car load delivered and now in the cafe loading up on energy, I hope. We both feel like it's 3am and our taxi has just arrived to head to the airport on holiday (that knackered), only without the luxury of spending the day sat on our arse going on holiday. We're going to be dead by 10am, let alone tonight.
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