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Martin LaMonica
Works at The Conversation
Attended Cornell University
Lived in Cambridge, Mass
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Martin LaMonica

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Cities need a new approach to dealing with urban wildlife (coyotes, coons, cougars, etc.) An environmental historian tells us how we got here and where we should go next.
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California's top groundwater expert on how to avoid a catastrophe by overdrawing from state's aquifers. 
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A volcanologist talks about how lack of planning and poor understanding of volcanos made the eruption far more destructive than it could have been.
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Why Tesla's batteries will reshape how the grid is run and how people interact w/ their energy. 
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Home storage is better but for people who only need to travel 10 miles at a time they could 'sell' the extra juice in their batteries at peak demand for a healthy profit.
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Not many people may realize this but Europe's renewable energy mandate is putting new demands for US wood/biomass. That's changing the economics of forests in the south east US and raising questions over how sustainable forestry practices are. A professor from NC State explains: Burning wood for electricity: new demands, new questions http://theconversation.com/burning-wood-for-electricity-new-demands-new-questions-37954 
Europe's demand for biomass is putting new demands on US forests, raising questions over how working forests can operate sustainably.
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I wonder if they are doing the calculation for CO using electricity generated in the EU or the US. It's hard determine for this article the link to the source that is cited is broken.
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Global weirding - winter version
People in the eastern US have suffered two consecutive brutal winters, with cold air blasting large swathes of the country for weeks at a time.

Climate change is often associated with rising temperatures. But in this case, the opposite appears to be at work: there’s growing evidence that rapid warming in the Arctic is changing the typical wind pattern of the polar jet stream, says Rutgers University research professor Jennifer Francis. The result is persistent weather patterns – and this year and last it’s been dominated by 

Francis is clear that the results of her tests still need to be confirmed. But as society adapts to the effects of climate change, we need to understand what the latest science can tell us about our future. Read more at link below.
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That's why the better term is climate change rather than global warming. While correct, it seems to imply an almost gentle modest average increase. What we are finding is with more energy in the climate systems we get greater volatility and extremes.
And its not incremental (linear) but like many natural systems more logarithmic and sometimes even exponential with various feedback loops involved.
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Martin LaMonica

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Can the power grid survive a cyberattack? Why the latest US military command after air, land, sea and space is: cyber.
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Is it safe to drill in the Arctic? Top risk expert in US says Shell, Department of Interior plan is not good enough. 
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An area of Oklahoma had 25 earthquakes in the past six days! What's behind the sharp uptick in seismic activity in the lands of fracking? And what can be done about. http://theconversation.com/why-is-oil-and-gas-extraction-causing-earthquakes-and-can-we-reduce-the-risk-40810
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You've heard about the "rooftop solar versus utilities." Here's an explainer on what's at play -- it's not just big guys versus green homeowners. What is it? the future of who pays for the grid. 
https://theconversation.com/why-rooftop-solar-is-disruptive-to-utilities-and-the-grid-39032
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What we know about sea level rise and Florida is not pretty. A University of Florida prof and expert on coasts paints the picture of today and the future. 
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It’s long been known the neurotoxin mercury accumulates in large fish, including tuna, but many scientists believed that levels in ocean fish hadn’t gone up in recent decades. Because the ocean is so big, the thinking was that mercury would not accumulate in dangerous amounts. 

University of Michigan research scientist Paul Drevnick tested this idea and concluded it didn’t hold up. Reviewing previous studies, he and his colleagues found mercury levels have risen significantly in the ten-year period ending in 2008. The culprit? Air pollution. 

Having the best science on mercury poisoning is particularly important now because levels in ahi tuna are now reaching levels considered unsafe by the EPA. As for his study, it “will either quiet the debate or add more fuel to the fire,” Drevnick says. 

Read more https://twitter.com/us_conversation 
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Have him in circles
2,883 people
ia db's profile photo
David Tribe's profile photo
Semed Eshrefov's profile photo
Usman Kiyani's profile photo
Jen White's profile photo
Mark Keller's profile photo
Irish Peruela's profile photo
Ghenia Mercy's profile photo
olfa assoudi's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Journalist
Employment
  • The Conversation
    Deputy Managing Editor, 2015 - present
    Deputy editor and environment & energy editor at The Conversation US, a news analysis and commentary site written by academics for a general audience.
  • Xconomy
    National correspondent, 2015
    Reporter covering energy and technology at Xconomy.com
  • Independent
    2012 - 2015
    I write on science, technology, and business for different outlets, including MIT Technology Review, New Scientist, the Boston Globe, the Guardian, Greentech Media, and GreenBiz.
  • CNET
    Senior Editor, 2002 - 2012
  • InfoWorld
    Executive Editor, 1995 - 2002
  • IDG
    Boston, Paris correspondent, 1991 - 1995
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Previously
Cambridge, Mass - Paris, France
Story
Tagline
Journalist
Introduction
I'm the Deputy Managing Editor of The Conversation, a news analysis and opinion site written by academics. I also edit the Energy and Environment desk at The Conversation. martin.lamonica@theconversation.com

Previously, I was the national correspondent for business innovation site Xconomy and I wrote regularly for MIT Technology Review, IEEE Spectrum, Greentech Media, the Guardian, the Boston Globe, and others. For more about, www.martinlamonica.com. You can contact me via Twitter @mlamonica or email lamonicamartin(at) gmail.com
Bragging rights
CNET's Green Tech blog, which I ran, was nominated as best News or Political blog for the 2010 EPPY awards from Editors and Publishers. Treehugger voted Green Tech the top green science and technology blog and my feed @mlamonica the best Twitter feed. Mother Nature Network chose me as a Leading Voice in Sustainability on Twitter.
Education
  • Cornell University
  • Newton North
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Gender
Male