Profile

Cover photo
Martin Andersson
AboutPostsCollections

Stream

Martin Andersson

Shared publicly  - 
 
This is a very interesting article with a scope that goes far beyond what the title implies. It is also a lot less dense than the impression given by the original posters quote.
 
"Reanalyses of Randomized Clinical Trial Data" https://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1902230 is an interesting citation:

"Results  We identified 37 eligible reanalyses in 36 published articles, 5 of which were performed by entirely independent authors (2 based on publicly available data and 2 on data that were provided on request; data availability was unclear for 1). Reanalyses differed most commonly in statistical or analytical approaches (n = 18) and in definitions or measurements of the outcome of interest (n = 12). Four reanalyses changed the direction and 2 changed the magnitude of treatment effect, whereas 4 led to changes in statistical significance of findings. Thirteen reanalyses (35%) led to interpretations different from that of the original article, 3 (8%) showing that different patients should be treated; 1 (3%), that fewer patients should be treated; and 9 (24%), that more patients should be treated."
Major flaws in two massive trials of deworming pills show the importance of sharing data — which most scientists don't do.
View original post
1
Greg Metcalfe's profile photoHenk van der Gaast's profile photo
5 comments
 
WE.. are all of us and not just a US centric notion of we.  After all we have had to cop this ridiculous fairy fundamentalism from the US as well.

You'll find the spin on "just sufficient" research is monstrous if you trowell the EB literature.  I am sure I have gone over it earlier.

The reviewers in journals part of we should hav a bigger case of the smarts.  In health aspects, leading organisations such as WHO should have a bigger case of the smarts.

I think this business of negotiating facts that is dirt common all the way through our conversations should take a bit of a review.

But then maybe my "chackras arent aligned".

How often each day do we hear such ridiculous notions being drooled into our day to day conversations?

"We" have a problem when we go question begging about "Us" just to establish "Phew, I'm not part of this problem"..

Yes we are..  You only have to look at the raving anti science commentary that resounds from luddism
Add a comment...

Martin Andersson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Time for reflection....
 
New York-based artist Ray Bartkus has created a beautiful mural in the Lithuanian city of Marijampolė designed to use the surface of the water as its true canvas. Bartkus intentionally painted it upside-down so that the swimmers, rowers and swans he depicted would be reflected right-side-up onto the river Šešupė, which flows through the city's center.
1 comment on original post
6
1
Greg Metcalfe's profile photoCharles Filipponi's profile photo
7 comments
 
Yup - it's a funny thing, an expectation. Meeting it can be boring, or enjoyable, or irritating (like someone constantly poking you in the shoulder). And not meeting it is the same thing. It all depends on the set-up and one's mood/expectation-value.

Art, music is like that. If you think of the Pink Panther theme, there is this moment of tension rising and then a relief and for various reasons, it is pleasing. The rise in tension and then the release.
Add a comment...

Martin Andersson

Shared publicly  - 
 
It's samurai-monkeys and paisley hummingbirds all the way down.
 
A visualisation of what's happening inside the mind of an artificial neural network.
View original post
2
1
Martin Andersson's profile photoHenk van der Gaast's profile photoDenis Poussart's profile photo
3 comments
 
Ive not undone the kids blocks whn they owned this "hand dad up"..  Winternet is only 10Gb and I chew that up within 2 months on just searches..

Thanks for the Link tho..  its a scream!  With that level of pareidolia the network will be a shaman in no time flat!


What a lovely world.. where machines do all the believing for you..  Thanks for the comedy douglas adams and thanks for the post +Martin Andersson 
Add a comment...

Martin Andersson

Shared publicly  - 
 
"And WebAssembly is indeed a compressed AST encoding, not a stack bytecode. Shhh, don't tell anyone. You can still call it bytecode if you like."  -BrendanEich  
[https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9733762]
1
1
george oloo's profile photo
Add a comment...

Martin Andersson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Ain't no particular sign....
I'm more compatible with
I just want your extra time and your....
.....
[Guitar goes: Bada-bada-bada ]
.....
2
Martin Andersson's profile photoHenk van der Gaast's profile photo
6 comments
 
They take all the fun out of things in other countries..
Add a comment...

Martin Andersson

Shared publicly  - 
 
When you put it that way.... 
3
Martin Andersson's profile photoGreg Metcalfe's profile photo
3 comments
 
Martin shoots and scores! I guess we wouldn't really care about length, would we. 
Add a comment...

Martin Andersson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Torolf Sauermann cleaning his Blender lint filter.

I thought this blender fractal image was pretty neat. Then the pareidolia kicked in, and now I can't unsee the skull trapped in moldy growth.
 
mandelbulb3d voxel stack image 1024 x 1024 blender cycles demo
13 comments on original post
3
Greg Metcalfe's profile photoMartin Andersson's profile photo
2 comments
 
Glad I could introduce you to the wondrous world of pareidolia +Greg Metcalfe. I am only vaguely aware of the Däniken guy that you mention, and I don't have time to look him up at the moment. Is he the 'German Accent Guy' pairing up  with  'Wild Hair Dude' on History Channel saying they are 'not saying it is aliens', but it probably is anyways?
Add a comment...

Martin Andersson

Shared publicly  - 
 
The tyranny of algorithms
 
Funny story of a software design issue:  Failure to anticipate the existence of bald people in automatic image framing.
A simple errand to get a passport photo exposes the blinkered logic lurking in the rule-bound technologies that pervade our lives.
View original post
3
Add a comment...

Martin Andersson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Spin doctors having fun
 
What the The Magnus Effect lacks in a cool name - it sure bounces back with some neat features. Check out this video and be aware of Magnus! 
View original post
3
Add a comment...

Martin Andersson

Shared publicly  - 
3
Add a comment...

Martin Andersson

Shared publicly  - 
 
This is really interesting. Interesting and surprising. And it seems possibly a game changer for MS and Alzheimer research. 

Even Kipnis was skeptical initially. “I really did not believe there are structures in the body that we are not aware of. I thought the body was mapped,” he said. “I thought that these discoveries ended somewhere around the middle of the last century. But apparently they have not.”

The unexpected presence of the lymphatic vessels raises a tremendous number of questions that now need answers, both about the workings of the brain and the diseases that plague it. For example, take Alzheimer’s disease. “In Alzheimer’s, there are accumulations of big protein chunks in the brain,” Kipnis said. “We think they may be accumulating in the brain because they’re not being efficiently removed by these vessels.” He noted that the vessels look different with age, so the role they play in aging is another avenue to explore. And there’s an enormous array of other neurological diseases, from autism to multiple sclerosis, that must be reconsidered in light of the presence of something science insisted did not exist.
 
Researchers Find Missing Link Between the Brain and Immune System

Implications profound for neurological diseases from autism to Alzheimer's to multiple sclerosis.

The research is in Nature. (full access paywall)
Researchers discover the brain and immune system are directly linked through vessels previously thought not to exist.
3 comments on original post
3
Henk van der Gaast's profile photo
 
That.. and a whole new level of inquiry for science..

Great spot there Martin.. 
Add a comment...

Martin Andersson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Interesting post about Alicia Bool (Daughter of George, the father of Boolean logic) and her work to visualize 4D geometries in lower dimensions.
 
See 4D
with Alicia Boole

Starting at eighteen, with little specially coloured cubes, that had been devised by a regular visitor to her home, Charles Howard Hinton, to visualise the four dimensional Tesseract which he had named, Alicia Boole was able to develop a phenomenal ability to visualise four dimensions. She went on, as Alicia Boole Stott, to publish papers on the subject, share her models and collaborate with other mathematicians.

In the same way that we cut through three dimensional shapes with an infinitely thin knife in order to visualize their two dimensional cross-sections, and perhaps with a lot of practice, and the right use of angles, we can work backwards from cross-sections to reproduce the solid, Alicia was able to mentally cut through four dimensional polytopes to see the three dimensional shapes that are their sections. She was able to see these polyhedra change size and for new three dimensional shapes to appear and disappear as she cut further through the four dimensional object in her mind.  Alicia then drew what she saw and made nets and models to explain the 4 dimensional polytopes she visualised to other people.

Given the fact that her father was the logician Boole, of Boolean logic fame, and her mother was related to the Everests of Mount Everest, it seems likely that Alicia could have accomplished more if her father had not died when she was four years old and she was plunged into penury, and it may have helped if the education system had provided better formal education to the females of the time.

However, she certainly received a good tuition from her mother. Mary Everest Boole had studied with her husband, George Boole. When Boole died, Everest Boole moved to England and was offered a job at Queen’s College in London as a librarian. Her passion however was teaching, and she liked giving advice to the students [Mich]. She had innovating ideas about education, believing for example that children should manipulate things in order to make the unconscious understanding of mathematical ideas grow [Mich]. Her belief that models should be used in order to visualize and understand geometrical objects is reflected in the following words:

There is another set of models, the use of which is to provide people who have left school with a means of learning the relation between three dimensions and four. [Eve1] The geometric education may begin as soon as the child’s hands can grasp objects. Let him have, among his toys, the five regular solids and a cut cone. [Eve2]

The Princess of Polytopia: Alicia Boole Stott and the 120-cell: http://goo.gl/cul3bd

Dissertation (open) on Alicia and her polytopes (from Groningen): http://goo.gl/igTCqK
And as a (closed) paper by Irene Polo-Blanco: http://goo.gl/xYQPaX

Using Cross sections: http://goo.gl/JqNE8l
Which is part of:
A fascinating guide to visualising 4D polytopes: http://goo.gl/Npmld5

Charles Howard Hinton: http://goo.gl/yS0SY2

Image: http://goo.gl/uJJFdH
8 comments on original post
4
Add a comment...
Martin's Collections
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Tagline, broken
Links