Profile

Cover photo
Martijn Vos
Lives in Amsterdam
861 followers|147,660 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosVideos

Stream

Martijn Vos

Shared publicly  - 
 
Since everybody is sharing their gamer profile, here's mine.

It looks quite odd, but that's probably because I like very different games, and have very different agendas in each. I play turn-based strategy games at the highest difficulty while looking for a challenge, and CRPGs at low difficulty looking for immersion, story, interesting characters, etc.

The survey doesn't really seem to take into account that you might have different agendas in different games. Stuff that I enjoy in some games but not in others, ends up pretty low as a result. (It is true that I really do not care for action and twitchiness no matter what the game is.)

Also note that this is about computer games. In board games or RPGs, agendas are again totally different. I expect Social and Creativity to be way higher there. But my computer gaming is almost entirely single player.
3
Add a comment...

Martijn Vos

Shared publicly  - 
 
I have no idea what to do, and time is running out. I already have way too much of this, and yet there are so many crazy cool ideas in here that I don't have yet and would love to have[1], but will probably not be able to use in the foreseeable future. And for every individual option, I think: $10 is a steal for this! But when I add it all together, it quickly adds up to way more than I should spend on this.

Here's an idea: has someone already made a campaign that makes use of all these minis?


[1] I'd love to have that shipwreck golem, for example. But when am I going to use it?
Reaper Miniatures is raising funds for Reaper Miniatures Bones 3: The Search for Mr. Bones! on Kickstarter! Reaper Miniatures Bones 3 is a project to continue the expansion of Reaper's Bones line of high-quality plastic gaming miniatures.
2
Add a comment...

Martijn Vos

Shared publicly  - 
 
This morning I saw a car tumbling through the air in a way cars really shouldn't. Right in front of us, while we were hurtling towards it at 100 km/h. Fortunately, my wife was driving (nobody is as perfectly in control behind the wheel as she is), and while I was still in the process of shouting expletives, she was already commanding me to call 112 while bringing the car to a safe stop.

She also turns out to be the perfect eye witness; while I saw it swerve and roll 2 or 3 times, she could describe in exact detail in what way it swerved where, where the driver really lost control and that it rolled only 1.5 times. A single roll is already quite a lot, I guess.

Fortunately, the four occupants survived with what seemed to be fairly minor injuries, considering the circumstances. The power of seatbelts, perhaps? I saw only a single ambulance at the scene, though the police still closed 3 (out of 5) lanes of traffic.

I couldn't help but check my kids' seat belts more thoroughly than usual. The oldest remained shaken for several hours afterward.
7
Mark Cunningham (thedeadone)'s profile photoRobert Bohl's profile photoMartijn Vos's profile photoWilliam Arndt's profile photo
8 comments
 
Humanity cares about small numbers. We care more when it's about 1 or 2 or even 3-4 people. People we can see and identify.

When it gets bigger than that, our minds simply process it as a statistic, because our compassion center remains disengaged, because we don't process the numbers the way we do individuals.

Take any Youtube video that shows some talented individual, who's maybe had a real hard turn of luck, for whatever reason but they are showcased as an individual. 

We react with tears, and amazement. We try to help that individual, we help get them some relief from their situation in life.

But that's because we have a definable goal/individual to try to help. We can do something for that 1 person.

But when the numbers get to large, our humanity doesn't know how to process it other than, a number with a tragedy.

We often find ourselves when we're confronted with those realizations about each one of those large numbers, is when it's broken down to the micro level. An individual. We want to help the individual. It's part of who we are. Add too many into the mix, we start to shut down.
Add a comment...

Martijn Vos

Shared publicly  - 
 
Posting way too much politics today, but here's an interesting perspective on some history that Europe seems doomed to repeat.
The judgements of our financial and political leaders are breathtakingly narrow. Nobel Prize-winning economist Amartya Sen considers the alternatives.
5
4
Shawn H Corey's profile photoDarius Constantine's profile photoHerawati Sirait's profile photoDavid Ross's profile photo
3 comments
 
+J. Neeld No, the US citizenry did not have a large amount of savings and most of it was spent before 1950.

Rationing mean material was diverted to the war, where it was destroyed. Rationing did not increase savings.

One could say that gov't spending had nothing to do with the economic boon of the 50s and 60s. One could also say the moon is made of green cheese. Both would be lies.
Add a comment...

Martijn Vos

Shared publicly  - 
 
Do you think slavery in the US ended when it ended? It didn't. It lasted a lot longer than that, and was only ended when the US needed some moral superiority over its enemies.
2
Martijn Vos's profile photoShawn H Corey's profile photo
2 comments
 
It didn't end; it was only temporary suspended.
Add a comment...

Martijn Vos

Shared publicly  - 
 
Is this music or politics? I don't know, but it's brilliant!
2
Add a comment...

Martijn Vos

Shared publicly  - 
 
Lunch arrangement at a reorganization kick off event of a major bank.

It feels a bit like a mix of "we've got way too much money" and "we really want to be hip".
2
Add a comment...

Martijn Vos

Shared publicly  - 
 
Starting on our Star Wars version of the Bayeux Tapestry.
17
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
861 people
Alex Chalk's profile photo
Dale Asberry's profile photo
1d4cast Podcast about Tabletop RPGs's profile photo
Roel Hendriks's profile photo
Phillip Kent's profile photo
Adam Minnie's profile photo
Peter Michael Sporer's profile photo
chandan negi's profile photo
Philip Gelatt's profile photo

Martijn Vos

Shared publicly  - 
 
Kate Tempest has a unique way with words.

Kate Tempest will connect you with your emotions and the cold, callous world around you. You may cry.
A celebrated English playwright and rapper connects with her audiences through storytelling and poetry.
1
Christian Griffen's profile photo
 
Yep. That poem choked me up right here on the train. 
Add a comment...

Martijn Vos

Shared publicly  - 
 
I finally read Lost Mine of Phandelver. It has good bits and bad bits. Some of the good bits are really inspired. For some of the bad bits, I really wonder what they were thinking, but fortunately most of them can be easily fixed.

That said, I'd prefer an adventure for beginners not to require any fixing. Well, maybe it doesn't require fixing for everybody, but I think some aspects really don't make much sense like this. Still, there's plenty of cool stuff in it too.

(Is that spoiler-free enough for a mini review?)
3
Christian Griffen's profile photoParide Papadia's profile photoMartijn Vos's profile photo
5 comments
 
Yes. Explicit quest givers that offer quests that have nothing to do with the main quest. The only reason to do them is for XP or to explore the world a bit more.

There is actually a good reason for these quests: if you miss major clues, these side quests provide alternate ways to get that info.

Also, all the quest givers are themselves highly competent former adventurers, members of various orders or secret organizations (into which they try to recruit the PCs), yet don't want to do these tasks themselves.

And one guy who lost everything he has, suddenly offers 700 gp for his quests. No idea where he got that money.

The fix is simple:don't focus too much on these people, don't let them all recruit PCs, and only when extraordinarily appropriate. Only offer these quests when the players miss or forget clues. Drop the unlikeliest rewards.
Add a comment...

Martijn Vos

Shared publicly  - 
 
My niece (almost 5) seems to have turned into some sort of bronze age hero.

(Meanwhile, we're listening to some live jazz while picknicking in the zoo.)
10
Chris Groff's profile photoMartijn Vos's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Chris Groff I certainly will! I wonder how we'll look back at it by then. Maybe it'll make complete sense.
Add a comment...

Martijn Vos

Shared publicly  - 
 
At a work related thing in an old sugar factory that looks like it's straight out of Fallout.
9
Chris Groff's profile photoMartijn Vos's profile photo
6 comments
 
I did. My phone makes sideways photos for some reason, so I rotated it correctly, and now G+ gives me these weird gaps above and below the image.
Add a comment...
Martijn's Collections
People
Have them in circles
861 people
Alex Chalk's profile photo
Dale Asberry's profile photo
1d4cast Podcast about Tabletop RPGs's profile photo
Roel Hendriks's profile photo
Phillip Kent's profile photo
Adam Minnie's profile photo
Peter Michael Sporer's profile photo
chandan negi's profile photo
Philip Gelatt's profile photo
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Amsterdam
Story
Introduction
Martijn Vos is a dad, Christian, gamer (tabletop RPGs, boardgames, strategy games, CRPGs), and freelance web developer (front and backend, Java, Groovy, Ruby, Javascript, AngularJS).
Bragging rights
Traveled to Timbuctoo and survived to return home. Married. Got a kid.