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Martijn Vos
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After the smashing success of Star Wars (Karsten's entire life revolves around Star Wars at the moment), we've started watching Indiana Jones movies. We did the first two so far.

Karsten remarked: "Indiana Jones looks like Han Solo, because they wear the same shirt."
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I thought it was the chin scar that made them look alike. 
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Playing as Ottomans, fighting Austria and Russia simultaneously. Not of my own choice either; it's really a Dutch-Austrian war, and I'm Netherland's ally, while Russia is Austria's ally.

#eu4
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Well, they are explicitly the easiest country to play. You've got to start somewhere, after all.

Also, if everything is balanced in the hands of the AI, then whichever country is played by the human has an unfair advantage.

But yes, Ottomans are extremely forgiving for a game that normally punishes aggression.
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Core Worlds is a brilliant game with one fatal flaw: every turn has two moments where you're encouraged to plan out your entire turn before you get to execute your plan (so it can still go wrong), which is a dangerous pitfall to people vulnerable to analysis paralysis, which is unfortunately a common affliction in my family.

I think the game would be improved if you removed the home world power, or allowed it to be used at any time.

#coreworlds  
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Think I'm 1 win 2 losses.  But the win just felt like I lucked upon it rather then earned it.
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The real goal of Europa Universalis IV: getting the biggest fontsize in the world for your country.
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The biggest I saw was when Portugal had lost their homeland but had captured pretty well all of China, Mongolia and eastern Russia...
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My last day at my current gig. I thought I had everything wrapped up and handed over to others, and now it looks like I just can't leave.

I'm taking away far too much knowledge about how to bootstrap and feed data to Angular apps from JSP files. Though admittedly that's stuff they should move away from anyway. But that's not where we are right now. Where they are right now, because I'm leaving.
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And of course it'd take longer for the content to show.
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Work in progress. I finally painted minis again for the first (or actually second) time in decades. A year ago I did a quick test on the bard on the left to see if I could still do it, and was completely unhappy with the result (boring unmixed colours, too much of that pure 'tanned leather' colour that I always overuse).

Today, I worked on the other two: an Arabic-looking cleric and a ranger with sword and bow. I'm playing a ranger with bow and greatsword in a desert-based campaign, and this was the closest match (the other option was the iconic Pathfinder barbarian with ridiculously wide sword and two javelins, but no bow). For the ranger I decided to forego the usual mandatory green or dark colours for the hooded cloak, and went with sand coloured instead. Tried to mix a lot of different colours to get the right sand colour, until I discovered that 'yellowed bone' was practically perfect all on its own. I also tried dark skin, which didn't turn out the way I hoped. My options were 'pale skin', 'tanned skin', 'dusky skin' (very grey) and 'muddy brown', which apparently isn't a skin colour. I suspect my 'flesh wash' isn't going to be much use either. Another problem is that I have no idea what to do with the colours other than the cloak and the skin. Trousers? Boots? Tunic? No idea what I want with them, which is a problem.

I don't have that problem with the cleric, which is based directly on the iconic cleric image from the Pathfinder Core Rules, so I'm just using the colours from that image, and that's turning out far better than I ever dared to hope. I'm not sure if it shows on the photo, but there's a lot of subtle shades on sand, bronze, skin, and gold. The two colours blue for the coat aren't perfect, but pretty good. (I still need to paint all that crap on the belt, and the short sleeves and some other bits are going to be white.) Frankly, I'm amazed and very pleased with myself right now. It's probably a fluke.

#miniaturepainting  
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Does anyone remember that combat archery video from a few years ago where Lars Anderson performed some astonishingly crazy combat archery tricks? He just took it up a few notches. A lot of notches. I mean, Robin Hood has nothing on this guy. By a long shot.

Some highlights:
* shooting 3 arrows in 0.6 seconds
* catching an arrow shot at him and shooting it back immediately
* shooting an arrow at a knife, splitting the arrow
* splitting an incoming arrow by shooting an arrow at it

This stuff is way beyond the already incredible speed shooting he showed last time.
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monody
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+Martijn Vos Well for one, he's not the first to demonstrate it. There are a lot of other archers and speed shooters that you can simply type in "speed shooting" right here on Youtube and see them going at it.

Mongolian and eastern archery is still very much a thing. It's not a lost art in any way. The reason you see so many speed shooters use "much slower techniques" is because they aim for balancing speed and power with efficiency.

What I mean for this is that, for example, the actual world record for fastest archer still stands with David Powers, who shot 22 arrows accurately into a target in one minute back in 2000. That's around twice as many arrows as Lars shot off when he was simply blindly firing into the air for maximum speed.

The reason for this difference is because speed shooter looking from a practical perspective are trying to shoot in a way that lets them place their shots with more force at a longer range not simply for those factors, but also with consistency over time without failing to how much stress pulling the string back and firing over and over is going to cause.

The claim that Andersen can't hit anything over 60 feet away isn't all that bogus when you consider that he's firing by pinching the arrow or otherwise using the Mediterranean style three-finger grip and not a Mongolian style thumb-grip. Like in the other video commentary you talked in, neither of the grips Andersen uses compensates properly for the archer's paradox, making his shots very visibly veer to the side when loosed. The fact he punches forward with the bow in an exaggerated motion and doesn't lock the bow arm only makes that effect worse.

Fact is Andersen really does lack a lot in the accuracy department when using his modified quick-shot method. You can see that he switches off to a different style, bracing his bow arm using a longer bow, which causes him to fire much slower when he actually does try to shoot down range.

And again, for the "anyone can learn how to shoot fast like this, there are again videos that you can actually see on Youtube not only of people doing so, but showing you how. You don't even have to be all that good of an archer.

One such person being "The Bow Channel", as that person pretty adamantly goes over the process and explanations of matching Lar's techniques.
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Two pigeons are stubbornly trying to raise a family in my bike. It started with me finding piles of twigs and occasionally spotting a pigeon loitering nearby. Back then, I naively thought that if I just prevented them from finishing the nest (by throwing the twigs out), they wouldn't lay an egg in the crate of my bike. The crate, I should add, that's meant for my newborn's safety seat, on the bike I use to go everywhere. So raising a family of pigeons in there is really not an option, and I hoped they'd take the hint. Apparently pigeons don't take hints.

Still, it's hard not to feel sorry for those winged rats, when they're looking around for their soon-to-be family, or even their twigless nest in one of the round holes in the rubber mat on the bottom of that crate. Because, you know, sometimes I need my bike, and then it's not where they expect it.
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Pigeons, they may not be smart but they are persistent.
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For my birthday I got this fully poseable Lego exosuit.

Put it together with Karsten (5) who surprised me by assembling the pretty technical torso almost entirely by himself (though I handed him the correct pieces and helped with the trickiest bits).

And to brag a bit more (that's allowed with your own kids, right?), he then proceeded to blow our mind by reading subtitles on TV. He was never much of a reader. I knew he could read, he just rarely felt like doing it. And out of nowhere he reads fast enough for subtitles.

How did my birthday post get to be all about him? Way to steal my thunder, kid.
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This has got to be the most wonderfully abusive flowchart ever.
Warning: this comic occasionally contains strong language (which may be unsuitable for children), unusual humor (which may be unsuitable for adults), and advanced mathematics (which may be unsuitable for liberal-arts majors). BTC 1FhCLQK2ZXtCUQDtG98p6fVH7S6mxAsEey ...
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Omg this thing is amazing! 
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Here's an argument against long weapon lists where sabers, falchions, regular one-handed swords (arming swords), and tons of other one-handed swords, all have slightly different stats. And against having different skills for them in heavily skill-based GURPS-like games.
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Haha, foul fiend! Take the stench of my trout!
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I don't want to preach full simulationism, but here's something interesting that a lot of RPG systems got backwards.
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yes I know about the zen archery feet
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Have them in circles
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Introduction
Martijn Vos is a dad, Christian, gamer (tabletop RPGs, boardgames, strategy games, CRPGs), and freelance web developer (front and backend, Java, Groovy, Ruby, Javascript, AngularJS).
Bragging rights
Traveled to Timbuctoo and survived to return home. Married. Got a kid.