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Mark Thomas
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Is there a bonafide bunch of the people in the US that are actually already going about changing the "democratic" process so this two party nonsense that has no public buy-in will be replaced with something democratic that will actually represent the US people when they choose representatives? I mean is something afoot there that's good, or is all just name calling and a "least-worst of the terrible" situation?
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Yes- some people are changing things
69%
Nope- its the current system or die
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It would take strong leadership with a sustained message promoting the virtues of a multi-party (more parliamentarian) system.   

Or, alternatively, maybe technology could be employed here?  Modify Pokémon Go to collect various 'new' political party tokens, with the final goal of having all players meet in one spot with their tokens, to exchange ideas, find common ground and launch these 'concepts' into the real world.  ....  For the short attention span general public, this may be more effective than waiting for a leader to come along..... :-P 
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Some try to tell you thoughts they cannot defend. Just what you want to be, you will be in the end....

Fantastic live version of Nights in White Satin with the big orchestral stuff going on.

The Moody Blues recorded the album with The London Festival Orchestra, which never actually existed - it was the name given to the musicians put together to make the Days of Future Passed album.

The orchestral parts were performed separately and edited between and around the Moody Blues parts, so the orchestra did not actually accompany the group. The original idea was for the group and orchestra to record a rock version of Dvorak's "New World Symphony," which their record company would use to demonstrate enhanced stereo sound technology.

This was written by Justin Hayward, who joined the band the previous year after Denny Laine left the group. He got the idea for the song after someone gave him a set of white satin sheets, and wrote it in his bed-sit at Bayswater. Haywood told the Daily Express Saturday magazine May 3, 2008: "I wrote our most famous song, 'Nights in White Satin' when I was 19. It was a series of random thoughts and was quite autobiographical. It was a very emotional time as I was at the end of one big love affair and the start of another. A lot of that came out in the song."


Haywood told the Daily Express Saturday magazine May 3, 2008: "I wrote our most famous song, 'Nights in White Satin' when I was 19. It was a series of random thoughts and was quite autobiographical. It was a very emotional time as I was at the end of one big love affair and the start of another. A lot of that came out in the song."

Before joining The Moody Blues, a teenaged Justin Hayward signed a deal with Lonnie Donegan's publishing company, which ended up giving Donegan the lion's share of the royalties for this and other songs Hayward wrote at the time. Donegan was star in the '50s, famous for his skiffle sound that influenced The Beatles and The Who. In the '60s, he became more involved in the business side of the industry and formed his publishing company Tyler Music.

Days of Future Passed is a concept album based around different times of day. For example, "Dawn Is A Feeling" and "Tuesday Afternoon." This song was last on the album because it represents nighttime.

Justin Hayward was inspired by Moody Blues keyboard player Mike Pinder's composition "Dawn Is A Feeling." Since Pinder had done "The Morning" for the concept album, Hayward tried to do "The Night."
Fans have come up with many interpretations of this song, which is just fine with Justin Hayward, who fells that the receiver gives life to the transmission. "It's the listeners who bring the magic and the interpretations to these songs," he said in his 2016 Songfacts interview.

This song introduced a new sound for the band. When they formed, they were more of a blues band, and had a hit in 1965 with a cover of Bessie Banks' "Go Now." With the songs on Days of Future Passed, they distinguished themselves with original songs in a more psychedelic/orchestral sound.

"Nights in White Satin" was originally released in 1967, charting at #19 in the UK, but topping out at #103 in America, where six-minute songs were a tough sell at the time. In 1972, after songs like "Hey Jude " and "Layla" paved the way for long, dramatic tunes (and The Moody Blues became more popular), the song was re-released in the US and became a hit, going to #2 and sending sales of the reissued album skyward.

In the UK, the song made two more chart appearances, going to #9 in 1972 and #14 in 1979.

The poem at the end was recorded separately. It is called Late Lament and was written by their drummer, Graeme Edge. The poem was read by keyboard player Mike Pinder. Edge wrote another poem that appeared early on the album called Morning Glory.

The Dickies 1979 Punk version reached #39; the Moody Blues used to use The Dickies version sometimes when doing a sound check.
The week of December 2, 1972, this song plunged from #17 to completely out of the Hot 100, setting a record for the biggest drop out of that chart in a single week. Drastic chart disappearances became more common in the '10s, and the Glee Cast version of "Toxic" made the fall from the #16 spot in 2010.

Talking about the experiences that inspired the lyrics to this song, Justin Hayward said: "About an audience in Glastonbury, a flat in Bayswater and the ecstasy of an hour of love."

Among the many artists to record this song are Procol Harum, Eric Burdon, Percy Faith, Nancy Sinatra and Il Divo. When we spoke with Justin Hayward in 2013, he told us that the best cover he heard of this song was by the soul singer Bettye LaVette. "She covered 'Nights,' and somebody sent it to me as an MP3, a link," he explained. "I was sitting in bed with my laptop waking up to my emails, and I clicked on this link and I burst into tears. My wife came in and she said, 'What the hell's the matter with you?' And I said, 'You've got to listen to this.' She didn't cry. But I heard the lyric for the first time. There have been hundreds, maybe thousands of covers of 'Nights in White Satin,' but that was the first time I heard it for real."

The Moody Blues enjoyed a long and illustrious career that took them well into the 2010's, and included thousands of performances, most of which featured this song. How does Justin Hayward handle the repetition? "I never lose the emotion of songs like that," he told us. "I'm lucky enough not to have lost the emotion or the motivation, because it's a wonderful thing to be able to share. And the audience provides the emotion around that. Because you do it in sound check and it's fine, but when there's an audience there, it completely transforms the experience."

Source: http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=1871
#moodyblues
#justinHayward
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One thing about the Moody's, every one of the 5 members contributed heavily on each album.  No ''leader' per se, each member was given the opportunity to step up to the forefront on any given song (evidenced by Graeme Edge writing the poem, Mike Pinder reciting it).  Days of Future Past is a remarkable album.  "Evening" a regular on the iPod.   1986 'The Other Side of Life' concert tour was quite the experience...but absent of Mike Pinder by that time.
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CCR remake of the Leadbelly classic "Cotton Fields" for some sweet midweek country/blues and gospel.

Here's leadbelly's original:
https://www.youtube.com/shared?ci=hTqqjb0vcfM

When I was a little bitty baby
My mama done rock me in the cradle
In them old cotton fields back home
It was back in Louisiana
Just about a mile from Texarkana
In them old cotton fields back home

Let me tell you now well got me in a fix
I caught a nail in my tire doing lickitey splits
I had to walk a long long way to town
Came along a nice old man well he had a hat on
Wait a minute mister can you give me some directions
I gonna want to be right off for home

When I was a little bitty baby
My mama done rock me in the cradle
In them old cotton fields back home
It was back in Louisiana
Just about a mile from Texarkana
In them old cotton fields back home

#ccr
#leadbelly

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They did a bang up job on this song too. One of those songs you wanna play over n over again.
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When the truth is found to be lies
And all the joy within you dies
Don't you want somebody to love?

Somebody to love was written by Grace Slick's brother-in-law, Darby Slick, in 1965. They were in a San Francisco band called The Great Society, which also included Jerry Slick, who was Grace's husband and Darby's brother (Jerry played drums; Darby played guitar). The Great Society released the song as a single in late 1965 with another Darby Slick composition, "Free Advice," on the B-side.

The single went nowhere, and when Darby started exploring Indian music in 1966, the group broke up and Grace joined Jefferson Airplane, which was already established. When she arrived at her new group, she came bearing hits: they recorded a new version of "Somebody To Love" and also did "White Rabbit," which she wrote as a member of The Great Society.

With royalties he earned from writing "Somebody To Love," Darby Slick spent years learning Indian music.

San Francisco in the mid-'60s was the epicenter of free love, but Darby Slick saw a downside to this ethos, as it could lead to jealousy and disconnect. This song champions loyalty and monogamy, as the singer implores us to find that one true love that will nurture us and get us through the tough times.

Jefferson Airplane's first hit song, "Somebody To Love" was also one of the first big hits to come out of the US West Coast counterculture scene. Over the next few years, musicians flocked to the San Francisco Bay area to be part of this scene.
The original version of this song that Grace Slick sang with The Great Society is more subdued. With Jefferson Airplane she sounds far more accusatory and menacing when she belts out lines like "Your mind is so full of red" and "Your friends, baby, they treat you like a guest."

#graceslick
#jeffersonairplane

Source http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=1251
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She had the best "machine-gun" vibrato.
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A few people said not to worry, that things might not be good, but they could never be bad like in the world wars under a Trump leadership because you have all these wonderful open lines of communication these days. Right? (And remember that phone networks are switching to Internet control).
 
I want to remind people of Donald Trump's words and what it means in the larger context of what is at stake in this election. This is from December of last year: We're losing a lot of people because of the Internet and we have to do something. We...
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Oh, can you see their world is crashing
(so many people, so many people)
Crashing down around their feet
And angry people in the street,
Are telling them they've had their fill
(so many people)
Of politics that wound and kill
(so many people)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80nUhHofw0U
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We are no longer in our silos, isolated, at least not from a communication perspective, if we choose not to be. We talk with each other on some things like you were living just up the road. We get a sense of each other. Yet this digital togetherness can also create more real world divisions. We are all much more of an often dysfunctional community than we ever were.
 
There is a need for greater warm-heartedness and compassion. We are now so interdependent that it is in our own interest to take the whole of humanity into account. It clear that real hope lies with the generation who, now less than 30 years old, belong to the 21st century. If they start now to learn from the past and shape a different future, by later this century the world can be a happier more peaceful place.
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Excellent post. The digital world can bring us together in achieving better and peaceful communication if everyone had open minds and welcomed each others opinions and are more willing to compromise rather than fight or dismiss. It starts with respecting each other as human beings, differences and all.
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One of the excellent songs on the awesome Pulp Fiction.

Son of a preacher man was originally offered to Aretha Franklin (who is a preacher's daughter), but she turned it down because she thought it was disrespectful. She subsequently changed her mind and did a cover version of it. (thanks, Adam - Dewsbury, England)

The backup vocals were by a female group called the Sweet Inspirations, who were made up of Cissy Houston, Sylvia Shemwell, Myrna Smith and Estelle Brown. They were the sought-after female backup vocalists in the New York area, having performed on albums by Aretha Franklin, Wilson Picket, Van Morrison and many others. With four singers, they could create a rich, soulful sound that suited this song perfectly.

#dustyspringfield

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http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=3346
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Also that would be my experience too +ralphyboy25​. I've found that those with all the public commitment to Christianity the religion to be mostly the worst somewhere in the family. Those who dont attribute to a religion but just quietly have the values anyway are usually the most "Christian" Ive found.
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Have them in circles
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Get some awesome Aretha live.

Natural Woman was written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King. They were a married couple who worked out of the famous Brill building in New York City, where many hits from the '60 were written and recorded. Ode Records owner Lou Adler, who worked closely with King and Goffin, said: "Gerry Goffin is one of the best lyricists in the last 50 years. He's a storyteller, and his lyrics are emotional. 'Natural Woman,' 'Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow.' These are perfect examples of situations, very romantic, almost a moral statement. Coming out of the 1950s, with the type of bubble gum music, and then in 1961, Gerry is writing about a girl who just might let a guy sleep with her and she wants to know, 'is it just tonight or will you still love me tomorrow?' Goffin could write a female lyric. If he could write the words to 'Natural Woman,' that's a woman speaking. Gerry put those words into Carole's mouth. He was a chemist before he was a full time lyricist. He's very intelligent and obviously emotional."

Regarding the origins of the song, Adler added: "Last year (2007) I spoke to Jerry Wexler at his home in Florida, and he told me the story that Gerry was coming out of a building in New York, (Goffin now remembers it as an Oyster House), and Jerry Wexler is passing in a car, and yells out, 'Why don't you write a song called 'Natural Woman'?' They felt the title was so distinct and so important to the song that they gave him a piece of it. So, when I spoke to Jerry recently to call him on his 90th birthday, he said, 'Isn't it amazing what those kids gave me? The checks keep coming in and I'm really happy about it.' Knowing how much he added to the song, not really as a third writer but the title and the inspiration of what was to be, a great song."

The recording features the vocal talents of three Franklin sisters - Erma and Carolyn are singing in the background. Erma had a record deal in the '60s, but didn't have much success. Her biggest hit was the 1967 song "Piece Of My Heart."
Carole King recorded her own version of this song on her 1971 Tapestry album.

Source
http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=2198

#aretha
#arethafranklin
#caroleking

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What an amazing lady
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Sweet, love my pup, and all those that came before her!
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Procol Harum's lyricist Keith Reid wrote the words to Whiter Shade of Pale. He told http://songfacts.com: "It's sort of a film, really, trying to conjure up mood and tell a story. It's about a relationship. There's characters and there's a location, and there's a journey. You get the sound of the room and the feel of the room and the smell of the room. But certainly there's a journey going on, it's not a collection of lines just stuck together. It's got a thread running through it." Reid got the idea for the title when it came to him at a party, which gave him a starting point for the song. Says Reid: "I feel with songs that you're given a piece of the puzzle, the inspiration or whatever. In this case, I had that title, 'Whiter Shade of Pale,' and I thought, There's a song here. And it's making up the puzzle that fits the piece you've got. You fill out the picture, you find the rest of the picture that that piece fits into."

Reid formed Procol Harum in 1967 with Gary Brooker, becoming an official member even though he didn't sing or play any instruments. "A Whiter Shade Of Pale" was one of about 15 songs that he wrote for their first album.

Says Reid: "We were really excited about it and liked it a lot. And when we were rehearsing and routine-ing our first dozen songs or so, it was one that sounded really good. But there were a few others that we liked I would say equally - we have a song on our first album called 'Salad Days (Are Here Again)' that was a strong contender. At our first session, we cut four tracks, and 'Whiter Shade of Pale' was the one that recorded best. In those days it wasn't just a question of how good is your song? It was how good of a recording can you make? Because it was essentially live recording, and if you didn't have a great sound engineer or the studio wasn't so good, you might not get a very good-sounding record. And for some reason everything at our first studio session came out sounding really good."

Procol Harum had a few more modest hits, including "Homburg" and "Conquistador," but they attracted a devoted following, releasing 10 albums before breaking up in 1977 (they would re-form in 1991). The band was always more concerned with the quality and integrity of their music than with serving the singles market, which them unlikely candidates for one of the most successful singles of all time. When we spoke with Gary Brooker on the subject in 2010, he explained: "What is a hit? I think that any song that's going to immediately capture people and stay with them for a bit. What happens with a song that becomes a hit is that people want to hear it again, they've got to hear it again. Therefore, that requires what we call 'hooks,' doesn't it? And hooks can be all sorts of things, they can be just a little turnaround in the song. Often the people that aren't musicians, the producers and the people at record companies, are the ones that pick up on what is the hook. It might be an unimportant part of the song to you, but suddenly that is the part of the song that captures you. That's the part that hooks you and gets you in. So if you're thinking of a single, then you've got to have hooks and/or you've also got to have something that's quite different to everything else that's around. I think 'A Whiter Shade of Pale' fell into that category, something like - what's the one by the Irish girl that was a Prince song? 'Nothing Compares'? That's got lots of hooks in it, also. It was very different to whatever else was around musically, off the wall and interesting. We don't always want what we heard last week. It doesn't mean to follow the fads and fashions is what makes a success, often it's the complete opposite of that. The go-where-no-man-dares-to-tread."
Gary Brooker recalled the writing of the music in an interview with Uncut magazine February 2008: "I'd been listening to a lot of classical music, and jazz. Having played rock and R&B for years, my vistas had opened up. When I met Keith, seeing his words, I thought, 'I'd like to write something to that.' They weren't obvious, but that doesn't matter. You don't have to know what he means, as long as you communicate an atmosphere. 'A Whiter Shade Of Pale' seemed to be about two people, a relationship even. It's a memory. There was a leaving, and a sadness about it. To get the soul of those lyrics across vocally, to make people feel that, was quite an accomplishment.

I remember the day it arrived: four very long stanzas, I thought, 'Here's something.' I happened to be at the piano when I read them, already playing a musical idea. It fitted the lyrics within a couple of hours. Things can be gifted. If you trace the chordal element, it does a bar or two of Bach's 'Air on a G String' before it veers off. That spark was all it took. I wasn't consciously combining rock with classical, it's just that Bach's music was in me."
In the same Uncut interview, Keith Reid recalled the writing of the lyrics: "I used to go and see a lot of French films in the Academy in Oxford Street (London). Pierrot Le Fou made a strong impression on me, and Last Year In Marienbad. I was also very taken with surrealism, Magritte and Dali. You can draw a line between the narrative fractures and mood of those French films and 'A Whiter Shade Of Pale.'

I'd been listening to music since I was 10, from '56 to '66-The Beatles, Dylan, Stax, Ray Charles. The period of 'A Whiter Shade Of Pale' was the culmination of that 10 years of listening. But my main influence was Dylan. I could see how he did it, how he played with words. I'd met Pete Townshend through Guy Stevens (A&R man and Procol Harum's original manager), and he'd put my name forward when Cream were looking for a lyricist. Then Guy put me and Gary together. I was writing all the time. 'A Whiter Shade Of Pale' was just another bunch of lyrics. I had the phrase 'a whiter shade of pale,' that was the start, and I knew it was a song. It's like a jigsaw where you've got one piece, then you make up all the others to fit in. I was trying to conjure a mood as much as tell a straightforward, girl-leaves-boy story. With the ceiling flying away and room humming harder, I wanted to paint an image of a scene. I wasn't trying to be mysterious with those images, I wasn't trying to be evocative. I suppose it seems like a decadent scene I'm describing. But I was too young to have experienced any decadence, then, I might have been smoking when I conceived it, but not when I wrote it. It was influenced by books, not drugs.

It was twice as long, four verses. The fourth wasn't any great loss, but you had the whole story in three. When I heard what Gary'd done with them, it just seemed so right. We felt we had something very important. As soon as we played it for anyone, we got an immediate response.

In rehearsal, instrumentation was added. We had this concept for the sound of Procol Harum to be Hammond organ, piano and blues guitar. No other band had that; it gave us a bigger sound. It's a live recording… I think we did three takes. It's equal parts Dylan and Stax. On our own terms, we were always trying to make a soul record. Funnily enough, Otis Redding wanted to do it, but we wanted our record out first, and Stax wanted the exclusive."
The "Vestal Virgins" were the virgin holy priestesses of Vesta, the goddess of the hearth and home. There were six of them chosen by lot and they were sworn to celibacy. Their main task was to maintain the sacred fire of Vesta. The Vestal duty brought great honor and afforded greater privileges to women who served in that role. The Vestals lived in the Atrium Vestae near the circular Temple of Vesta at the eastern edge of the Roman Forum.
This was the first song Procol Harum recorded. After it became a hit, they fired their original drummer and guitarist, replacing them with Barry Wilson and Robin Trower - more experienced musicians who could handle the subsequent touring.
Nearly 40 years after this song was released, Matthew Fisher, who played the organ in the recording, filed a lawsuit claiming that he deserved songwriting royalties for his contributions. In 2006, a judge agreed and awarded Fisher part of the copyright. In 2008, the British court of appeals overturned Fisher's right to collect royalties due to the delay in filing his claim, but it upheld, by a unanimous decision, his composer credit which had been awarded by the High Court, confirming that Fisher's organ solo was part of the song's composition. Fisher was granted permission to appeal this decision in the House of Lords and on July 30, 2009 the Law Lords unanimously ruled in the organist's favour, pointing out that there were no time limits to copyright claims under English law. The ruling means that he now receives a share of future royalties for the track. A delighted Fisher commented: "This was about making sure everyone knew about my part in the authorship." One of the five judges who heard the case, Baroness Hale, said: "As one of those people who do remember the '60s, I am glad that the author of that memorable organ part has at last achieved the recognition he deserves." >>
On July 24, 2008, Matthew Fisher's friend and collaborator Alan Fox told us why Fisher waited nearly 40 years to bring his lawsuit: "In fact, Matthew did not wait 40 years to bring this case to court. He tried 4 times between 1972 and 2005, but was told each time by counsel that he had absolutely no chance of making a successful claim. This of course was never reported. It wasn't until he met his current lawyers Jens Hill, that he was told that he had a very strong claim and decided to proceed."

This was one of the biggest hits of the "Summer Of Love" (1967). John Lennon was a big fan of the song.

Annie Lennox covered this in 1995. It is on her album Medusa, and hit #16 in the UK. Willie Nelson also covered this.

There are two additional verses that Procol Harum used to sing at live events. They're listed on the lyrics page. Reid told us why they were removed: "Originally it was twice as long, and that was partly because at that time there was somewhat of a vogue for really long songs, whether it be Dylan or The Beatles "Hey Jude." So I was trying to write a really long song. But as we started routine-ing it and getting it ready to record, one of the verses just fell away pretty naturally - we dropped it pretty early on in the process. We felt it was just a bit too long, because, the song was like nearly 10 minutes. We were rehearsing it with three verses, so it was running about 7 minutes or so, and our producer said, 'Look, if you want to get airplay, if you want this record to be viable, you probably should think about taking out a verse.' And we did. I didn't feel badly about it because it seemed to work fine. It didn't really bother me."
This song has a chord progression that is similar in spots to that of "When A Man Loves A Woman" by Percy Sledge, although its melodic line is quite different. It is the chord progression, melodic line and song lyrics working together that make a song into a unique artistic entity.

The lyric, "As the miller told his tale" sounds like a reference to "The Miller's Tale," from Chaucer's English novel The Canterbury Tales. This tale is well known to English students as a vulgar or bawdy story, told by the miller. Given this, the line, "And so it was that later as the miller told his tale, that her face, at first just ghostly, turned a whiter shade of pale" is an attempt by a young man, who has just caused a girl to turn pale by telling some vulgar story, to explain away her signs of disgust as due to other things. Such as the dancing, the drinking.
Reid, however, disproves this theory. He told us: "I'd never read The Miller's Tale in my life. Maybe that's something that I knew subconsciously, but it certainly wasn't a conscious idea for me to quote from Chaucer, no way."

An instrumental version by the saxophonist King Curtis plays behind the opening credits of the 1988 film Withnail & I.

The song was heard in the NBC and Hallmark Entertainment Miniseries The 10th Kingdom, a 5 hour miniseries about a teenage girl and her father who are engaged in a fantasy world of the Grimm Fairy Tales coming to life. The scene has John Larroquette and Kimberly Williams, as the father and daughter, entering a swamp, where Talking Mushrooms trick the two to eat them. The song "A Whiter Shade of Pale" plays from just a faint sound to a full audio clip. >>

In 2004, the UK performing rights group Phonographic Performance Limited named this the most-played record on British TV and radio of the past 70 years. In 2009 it was announced that this song is still Britain's most played record. The runner-up in the list was Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody." The two songs share one unusual similarity-on both of them the word "fandango" crops up in the lyrics.
In the UK, this was re-released in 1972.
This song also won a Brit award for Best British Pop Single 1952-1977. It was the joint winner along with Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody."

Denny Cordell produced this track. He became Joe Cocker's manager and in the '70s started an independent record label called Shelter Records, whose acts included Leon Russell, J.J. Cale and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

The German hard rock singer Doro Pesch covered this song on her 1989 solo album Force Majeure.

Greg Kihn's novel Shade of Pale takes it title from this song. The song itself is referenced quite a few times within the story. >>
This is one of Billy Joel's favorite songs. He performed it on his 2014 town hall special with Howard Stern, where he said: "It sounded different from anything else that was on the radio at that time. It had a keyboard part that was the main theme through the record - Matthew Fisher's organ part. There was an element of classical music in it; I didn't know what the lyrics were about, but it took me to another place, it was atmospheric. I lot of the music speaks to you."

Source http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=1131

#proculharum

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Whiter shade of pale reminds me of "Knights I white satin"recorded by the Moody Blues. Both are beautifully written.
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Mark Thomas

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Always reject the lead role in a cage, always accept the walk on part in the war- The Story of Wish You Were Here. The Album, Syd, Interviews with every band and management member including Storm,  How they nearly didn't continue at that point, how they wanted to stop after Dark Side, How disconnected the band became, How four notes on Shine On became a dedication to Barrett, How days were wasted and unproductive,  How Roger fought for the Theme, Being a buying and selling machine, The recording business, Record company power and pressure, The loss of control, (and that impact on Syd), how stardom makes you want to withdraw,  The terrible vox by Roger and David on Have a Cigar until Roy Harper came along and gave it balls (but Roger didnt like it), Roger's work ethic, Storm on the artwork and his preoccupation with Fire, Water and Earth (and travel!). When and why things began with Gerald Scarfe, Mickey Mouse wasted, Pretentious Crap, The Shine On Jam,  How the Four Notes were recorded, Rick Wright's brilliance, Wearing out Welcomes with random precision, Joe Boyd's call on Syd, Syd's mates, Syd on stage, How Syd was a hinderance, How there was no way back for Syd and the tragedy of that, reaching for secrets too soon, How the backing girls didnt really dig the scene, Roger's synth obsession on Machine,  Roger and Gerald's "bolshy" attitude to encumbent power brokers, people getting burned in the industry, Actually setting Ronnie Rondell on fire,  Roger and David on Wish You Were Here's composition,  Roger cries out: CAN YOU FREE YOURSELF ENOUGH TO BE ABLE TO EXPERIENCE THE REALITY OF LIFE AS IT GOES ON BEFORE YOU AND WITH YOU AND AS YOU GO AS PART OF IT. IF NOT YOU DIE". Their total contentment with Wish You Were Here, NEVER ACCEPT A LEAD ROLE IN CAGE, Always audition for the walk on part in the WAR, ENGAGE, (in a way his father would approve of),  One of the best due to Wish You Were Here's emotional weight,  How weird guy wandered into the studio that noone even recognised, How noone knew what to say to Syd, How Roger and David cried when Syd turned up with no eyebrows or hair, the shot of a totally sad Syd at the control desk, Imagining what and who Syd could have been if not for acid.

#PinkFloyd
#SydBarrett
#DavidGilmour
#RogerWaters
#FloydFixSunday
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ralphyboy25's profile photoDarren Jay Blagden's profile photo
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I do think and feel that The Dark Side of the Moon is, was and always will be THE definitive album for The Pink Floyd Sound. Other than the fact I have a personal affinity which leans me toward, "Atom Heart Mother" being my favorite. I do not want to appear to disparage nor hold up to any ridicule whatsoever their subsequent albums. The "Dark Side" album just simply has it all. It really does showcase the band as a working and united machine. The bitter sadness is palatable with the very next album, Wish You Were Here. Mr. Waters is quoted to have said, "It might as well have been entitled, "Wish YOU Weren't Here." Indeed, it must have been a tremendous struggle. 
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Mark Thomas

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Have to say that was pretty cool of Michelle Obama in that car singing this. No politics or anything. She was just her. Well OK there was some politics about what looks like her next move, but nowt to worry abowt.

Stevie was the man alright.

Wonder wrote this with Motown songwriters Lee Garrett and Syreeta Wright, along with his mother Lula Mae Hardaway. Garrett and Wright also worked with Wonder on the Spinners song "It's A Shame," and Wonder was briefly married to Wright. Like Stevie Wonder, Lee Garrett is also blind. They first met at the Michigan School for the Blind.

Elton John in Rolling Stone magazine's 100 Greatest Artists of All Times issue, said of Stevie Wonder: "He's so multitalented that it's hard to pinpoint exactly what it is that makes him one of the greatest ever. But first, there's that voice. Along with Ray Charles, he's the greatest R&B singer who ever lived. Nobody can sing like he does. I know: I actually recorded a version of "Signed, Sealed, Delivered" when I was young, and I really had to squeeze my balls to get those high notes." (thanks, Bertrand - Paris, France)

#steviewonder

Source http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=10166


Here's the Michelle Obama car thing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ln3wAdRAim4
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Nina Vesia's profile photoDiana  Inclan's profile photoClemente González's profile photoMark Thomas's profile photo
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I always try to give the original a 10x head start on subsequent covers for all the thought, talent and creativity that went into them. So a cover has to be 10x better just to be equal. 
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