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Mark Lewis
Works at Trinity University
Attended Trinity University
Lives in San Antonio, TX
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Mark Lewis

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An actual prediction on timing and price for Contour Crafting machines. It is interesting to note that the machine costs less than most houses in the US. Granted, that doesn't include the raw materials, but it makes it seem very reasonable.
Exclusive interview with Dr. Behrokh Khoshnevis: Contour Crafting machines will be available starting at around $200,000 within a couple of years.  Machine is
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This seems dead on.
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Mark Lewis

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All the presentations from Scala Days 2015 in San Francisco. It was a very enjoyable conference. I hope to find some time to watch a few of the presentations that I missed because of overlaps with others.
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Don't miss EMC's +Raghavan Srinivas' ( http://downloads.typesafe.com/website/presentations/ScalaDaysSF2015/T3_Srinivas_ScalaPlay.pdf?_ga=1.200368878.1747001409.1427654127 ) explanation of how to push Scala apps onto an IaaS with CloudFoundry. 
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I have had some debates here on G+, particularly with +Daniel Lemire, about the need for more people going into tech. The first page of this piece posts some nice data. The second page is the real kicker, showing that arguing based on average wage in the field is a seriously flawed approach.
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The reach of computers and technology goes beyond plain CS. My guess is that the ideal candidates have CS courses at least to the level of a minor for these position.
GuestIf you haven’t heard of data scientists and marketing technologists, don’t worry. You will.
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I'm going to share this even though I have big problems with it. I think that the best way to fix many of these problems would be to not write JavaScript. I like flexible, non-opinionated languages. However, I really prefer that they have static typing and a strong compile phase that tells you about most of your errors. The rule at the end about using only JavaScript seems like a horrible idea to me. I understand the logic. Using JavaScript for the client with PHP, Ruby, or Python as the server does seem like a dumb idea. Now you have two different dynamically typed languages that have seriously different semantics, and you get to juggle the rules in your head all day. That doesn't mean making everything JavaScript is the right way to get around that. How about trying a full stack that does static type checking? #Scala  is one option. You can pick the web framework and use Scala.js for the client side.
Zen JavaScript, or why should your code be as easy to read as Harry Potter
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That would be slow. Tools that convert from other languages to JS typically suffer when it comes to debugging. One of the things I heard at Scala Days was that the line mapping in Scala.js is really good and makes debugging easy. That is a really important feature for any tool like that.
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Yet another reason to pull for Tesla. I have been saying for quite a while that I expected autonomous cars to hit the roads by 2020. Many have told me I was being overly ambitious and it wasn't possible for it to move that fast. Now it looks like Tesla is going to make it happen in 2015. There is no question it will be present in 2020. The only question for 2020 is what percentage of new cars include the feature.
The automaker’s chief executive says a software update will allow the Model S to navigate highways without the driver’s touching the wheel or pedals. But is it legal?
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My commute will change. First, autonomous cars will help with traffic jams. Apparently you didn't see the study that showed that it only takes something like 25% of the cars on the road being autonomous to greatly improve traffic. Second, I can do something other than hold the wheel and watch the road. That means the ability to do things like read and deal with emails, improving my productivity dramatically during ~5 hours/week minimum.
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The title says it all. If I were at the age to do internships, this would certainly interest me.
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Me too. Lucky kids these days.
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What is the value of a particular branch of scientific research? I have often argued what this piece very eloquently states, it is a stupid question because you can't know the answer in advance.
No one who knows the history of science would ask this question.
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Another article +Isaac Thacker shared with me. I'm very interested in seeing how this works out. There was actually a discussion of this type of approach on a Computer Science education list. In that case, it was looking at Discrete Math and whether it should be taught as an independent course, or if other courses should present the required material as needed. That discussion pointed in the opposite direction of what Finland is doing. Departments/faculty who had tried it mostly said that they didn't like it. It had two negative effects. It slowed down the presentation of the other material and made things a bit disjoint because you would have to stop covering X to give students background knowledge in Y. It also seemed that it caused students to get less depth in Discrete Math overall as the only topics that were taught were those specifically required for other parts of the curriculum. There was a third problem as well, that won't impact primary and secondary school as much. That was the issue that at the college level a fair number of things are elective. So you have a lot less control over exactly what Discrete Math students wind up seeing if it is spread around.

I think I see this as a conflict between making things relevant to students and "efficiency" of teaching. It is a standard challenge with many types of approaches. Methods that facilitate retention often move through material more slowly. The argument is, "What good is it to teach something if students don't actually learn it?" That is a valid criticism. However, the better students still do retain things, and no one learns the stuff you never get to.

I also find it interesting how the title mentions math and physics instead of history or other humanities. The text makes it clear this is for everything.
Finland, one of the leading educational hotspots in the world, is embarking on one of the most radical overhauls in modern education. By 2020, the country plans to phase out teaching individual subjects such as maths, chemistry and physics, and...
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I don't like the analogy to a 3D printer, but I do think this is really cool. It should probably be called a molecular fabricator instead. There isn't any 3D about it, but it could have a profound impact on a number of fields. Not yet certain about home use though.
What will 3D printers ultimately evolve into? No one has a functioning crystal ball in front of them I assume, but a good guess would be a machine which can
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Mark Lewis

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This is one of many tabs I have had open a while and haven't had time to read and share. It was shared with my by +Isaac Thacker. The technology looks pretty impressive with the speed and smooth structure it produces. I wonder a lot about the physical characteristics of the results. That will have a big impact on what it can actually be used for. So does the ability to include conductive parts. Traditional 3D printing is already hitting the point where they can print functioning electronics. I wonder how well this method might support that.
The innovation in 3-D printing looks like the T-1000 rising fully formed from a puddle of metallic goo.
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My DLP printer did something similar with a resin. I'm sure it would conduct electricity if I added some carbon powder to it. Will try one day. If I need part to be more robust I add armature to resin. If I need surface hardness then I just make it on a lathe from proper metal.
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+Allison Lamm will love the comment about PHP.
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Php feels like a problem in search of a problem.
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Education
  • Trinity University
    Physics, 1992 - 1996
  • Trinity University
    Computer Science, 1992 - 1996
  • University of Colorado at Boulder
    Astrophysics and Planetary Science, 1996 - 2001
  • University of Colorado at Boulder
    Computer Science, 1998 - 2000
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Professor of Computer Science. Author of Scala textbooks. Ring dynamicist, coder, avid roller skater.
Introduction
I use Google+ to share ideas with people, including students. I also find hangouts to be a nice way to "meet" with students when I can't be on campus. If you would be interested in seeing the things I post related to computing, AI, robotics, or other stuff, just let me know.

A possible view of how to run the world in a post-scarcity future: "To each according to his usage. From each according to his desire. Automate the rest."
Bragging rights
It has been said that I make students cry. (Generally by the students.) However, I simply view my job to be working to build a better person, more equipped to handle the world in 5-10 years. If that means I have to completely destroy what they are today, so be it. :P
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Professor
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Programming (Scala, Java, C++, C, plus experience with many others), Planetary Dynamics, Writing (since I have publish a textbook to the inevitable dismay of my HS English teachers)
Employment
  • Trinity University
    Professor, 2001 - present
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San Antonio, TX
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Austin, TX - Boulder, CO - Westminster, CO - Arvada, CO
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210-999-7022
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Department of Computer Science, 1 Trinity Place, San Antonio, TX 78212
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Nice rink. Adult night had a lot of good skaters.
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