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Mark Hoemmen
Works at Sandia National Laboratories
Attended University of California Berkeley
Lives in Albuquerque, NM
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Mark Hoemmen

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I'm looking for examples of publications that show the difficulty of integrating two large software projects in industry.  It needs to be in industry, because some people accuse gov't of being inefficient at developing software.  Open- or closed-source doesn't matter; what matters is having a publication to cite.  Would anybody happen to have any suggestions?
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Dave Ackley's profile photoMark Hoemmen's profile photo
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+Dave Ackley A friend from Berkeley suggested the fall 1999 Hershey's SAP integration drama.  A friend from high school pointed out the Therac-25 accidents, which appear to relate to a poorly managed software / hardware integration.  The first involves a loss estimated at $150M, and the second gave a few people lethal radiation overdoses.  I'll keep looking for examples!

Mark Hoemmen

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Barry Smith's profile photoTim Tautges's profile photoMark Hoemmen's profile photo
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There's another point at the end there -- why are the labs losing so many folks to the private sector?  It's partly money, partly wanting to live in nicer places -- and partly something else.  People are willing to take a pay cut if they enjoy their work.

Mark Hoemmen

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"I am against adjournment. The day of judgment is either approaching, or it is not. If it is not, there is no cause for an adjournment; if it is, I choose to be found doing my duty. I wish therefore that candles may be brought." -- Abraham Davenport. 

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_England%27s_Dark_Day
New England's Dark Day refers to an event that occurred on May 19, 1780, when an unusual darkening of the day sky was observed over the New England states and parts of Canada. The primary cause of the event is believed to have been a combination of smoke from forest fires, a thick fog, ...
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John Gunnels's profile photoMark Hoemmen's profile photo
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Yet, we remember him for awesomely defying the Last Judgment ;-P

Mark Hoemmen

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FYI when citing FT-GMRES please refer to this tech report:

http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.1390

I've had zero time to write papers since then... Siva mentioned the discussion at the ExaMath meeting (he had to elbow Mike to make him realize you folks were talking about him).
Abstract: Energy increasingly constrains modern computer hardware, yet protecting computations and data against errors costs energy. This holds at all scales, but especially for the largest parallel computers being built and planned today. As processor counts continue to grow, ...
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Mark Hoemmen

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Mark Hoemmen

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Students: Apply for Sandia National Labs internships!

http://www.sandia.gov/careers/students_postdocs/internships/
Are you interested in continuing your education and obtaining a science, math, engineering, or business degree? Would you like to see how classroom theory applies in a work environment? If the answer ...
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Mark Hoemmen

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Nathan DeBardeleben's profile photoMark Hoemmen's profile photo
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I like the idea of an anthropologist studying scientists -- students of the liberal arts do have a lot to contribute to the analysis of work cultures and to improving mutual understanding.

Mark Hoemmen

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Grad students in high-performance computing (HPC), or in science or engineering applications that might use HPC: Apply for the George Michael Fellowship!  (Disclaimer: I'm on the selection committee (unpaid).)  Applications open Monday 03 March.
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Matthew Knepley's profile photoAron Ahmadia's profile photoKarl Rupp's profile photoJim Fonseca's profile photo
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There's fellowship money in the Banana Stand!

Mark Hoemmen

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I have been working on a research code with a colleague.  In a
comment, I explained why I complicated one part of the code in order
to preserve the strong exception guarantee.  This is a C++ way of
saying "transactional semantics": either the operation succeeds, or it
commits no side effects.  I remarked that preserving the strong
exception guarantee whenever possible is a kata -- practice of a form
that teaches through repetition.  This reminded me of the three stages of mastery:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shu_Ha_Ri

There are certainly reasons to "digress" (Ha) from the strong
exception guarantee.  One's software may be modeling or interfacing
with a physical system, where side effects commonly accompany (or
cause) failure to perform to specification.  (Light bulbs that don't
turn on probably have a burnt-out filament.)  Keeping the strong
exception guarantee also costs resources, such as temporary copies of input arguments.  Scientific computing tends to push resource
requirements, or at least has done so historically.  Thus, coders
working in this paradigm tend to favor conserving resources, like
memory and operations, at the expense of other guarantees.

The strong exception guarantee is a special case of an "invariant" --
a property of the program that does not change when a particular
routine runs.  I remember invariants as a tedious ritual of my
freshman introduction to programming course, rather like "showing
one's work" in algebra.  Both felt like "repeating the self-evident."
Successive programming courses dropped invariants without comment.  I wonder now whether continuous practice and respect for the "invariants kata" would have simplified some tricky data structures work later on. I wonder also if language support for declaring and checking invariants in my freshman course (we slogged our way through Java, which "dragged C programmers halfway to COBOL") would have made me appreciate their value sooner.
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Mark Hoemmen

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THIS
 
This is epic. I don't know how it got published in usenix, but I am not complaining.

Of course, pride precedes the fall, and at some point, you realize that to implement aggressive out-of-order execution, you need to fit more transistors into the same die size, but then a material science guy pops out of a birthday cake and says YEAH WE CAN DO THAT
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Mark Hoemmen's profile photoKevin Colby's profile photoCharles Ballowe's profile photoNicholas Haggin's profile photo
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"Justifies" is not quite the right word -- "explains" might be better.

Mark Hoemmen

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The first European Trilinos Users' Group Meeting: EPFL Lausanne 04-06 June 2012.
Navigation within EPFL sites; Navigation within this site; Jump to search field; Jump to page content; Technical contact. You are · Prospective students portal · EPFL Virtual tour · Exchange student ·...
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Jed Brown's profile photoMark Hoemmen's profile photoJeff Hammond's profile photo
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I think it should be a beard-off instead :-)

Mark Hoemmen

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INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE. A Definition of Computational Science. Computational science involves innovative and essential use of high-performance computation, and/or the development of hig...
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Scientist
Employment
  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Senior Member of R&D Staff, 2011 - present
  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Postdoctoral researcher, 2010 - 2011
  • Barcelona Design
    Graduate student intern, 2004 - 2004
  • Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
    Graduate student intern, 2006 - 2006
  • Beckman Institute (UIUC)
    Research programmer, 2000 - 2002
  • University of California Berkeley
    Graduate research assistant, 2003 - 2009
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Albuquerque, NM
Previously
Illinois, USA - Champaign, IL - Berlin, Germany - Berkeley, CA
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Interested in how numerical linear algebra intersects with performance, systems, and programming models.
Introduction
I'm a computer scientist who speaks math and does research in scientific computing.  I also contribute to the Trilinos software library of algorithms for solving large mathematics problems on computers of all sizes.
Education
  • University of California Berkeley
    Computer Science, 2003 - 2010
  • University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
    Mathematics and Computer Science, 1998 - 2002
  • Technische Universität Berlin
    Mathematics, 2002 - 2003
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Salty, dirty, dark, and miserable. At least the non-sweet lassi was reasonable.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
This is a good place to take a large group for a work lunch. Service is brisk and polite, and the food is never bad (but never awesome either). The lunch specials come with enough to feed two people generously. I've never tried eating dinner here, but I imagine a forklift would come in handy for the leftovers. The thing that persistently annoys me about the food is that some (but not all) dishes come sprinkled with hard, square little hash browns. They are so hard that they don't absorb any flavor, unlike the soft hash browns at Weck's that soak up all of the awesome green chile flavor for later release into your taste buds. I strongly dislike the hard little hash browns. They remind me of elementary school cafeteria fare, and take away from what would otherwise be pretty good food. On the other hand, I'm sure the servers would respect your request to leave them off your dish.
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Food: GoodDecor: GoodService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
Food is consistently good, though not extraordinary. One does get to like their signature salsa, which has a BBQ tang. The service is very good and fast. We had good luck taking a group of nearly 20 people here, and the servers even offered to let us split the check. The margaritas are tasty, and inexpensive, especially at happy hour. One won't go wrong coming here.
Food: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Very Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
5 reviews
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The book selection is not bad. The coffee isn't any worse than one normally finds, and the servers are always polite and helpful. I do wish the coffee shop part of the store were more inviting. Usually one has to fight for a seat, and there are no power plugs. It's also hard to find a calm place elsewhere in the store to sit and read. On the other hand, it's helpful that one can actually sit down and drink coffee, and it's a good spot for one to pass the time while one's spouse shops in the mall.
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Quality: GoodAppeal: GoodService: Very Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
A superb little store, with a great selection of mens' and women's hats and a stash of lightly used women's dress gloves and other accessories. Larry instantly recognized the hat on my head and identified where and how it was made. I've bought two felt hats from him and my spouse has bought a pair of gloves, and we were both pleased with their quality and durability. It's a lot of fun to browse, even though the store is small, and Larry knows where to find whatever you don't see in stock.
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Quality: ExcellentAppeal: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago