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Mark Hilverda
511 followers -
Geoscientist, web designer, classicist, and photographer.
Geoscientist, web designer, classicist, and photographer.

511 followers
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Mark Hilverda's posts

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Curiosity and the sands of Mars - wonderful ripple details. (Sol 1174 • Nov 25) 
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2015-11-25
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Ever wonder how planets are created? Scientists are still learning details about how planets form, and what better way to learn than to watch the process. Here’s the first photo of a planet still forming! 450 light-years away there's a planet in the disk around star LkCa15.
http://uanews.org/story/researchers-capture-first-photo-of-planet-in-the-making

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There's a lot going on here…Thin & delicate eroded layers in the foreground, large fractured rock, rippled sand, and bedrock all in one Mars image. (Curiosity raw image • Sol 1153)
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Our solar system is full of more worlds to explore. Recently discovered dwarf planet V774104 is 3 times farther away than Pluto.
http://news.sciencemag.org/space/2015/11/astronomers-spot-most-distant-object-solar-system-could-point-other-rogue-planets

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The view from below Curiosity. There's still a lot of Mars to be seen from this perspective. (Sol 1157 • Nov 8)
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New Pluto maps! Locations of more than 1000 craters & a 3D map that shows possible ice volcanoes. And some, or possibly all, of Pluto’s small moons may have formed from the merger of even smaller moons.
http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/four-months-after-pluto-flyby-nasa-s-new-horizons-yields-wealth-of-discovery
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2015-11-09
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A lone upright rock casts a long shadow near the Curiosity Mars rover (Sol 1158 • Nov 9)
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Cairo, Egypt and the Nile River from space. Imaged by ESA's Sentinel-2A satellite.
http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2015/11/Cairo_Egypt

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New measurements from the MAVEN spacecraft at Mars are revealing some details about what has happened to the the red planet’s atmosphere. Solar wind appears to remove Martian atmosphere at a rate of ~100g/s. Solar storms increase this erosion.
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-mission-reveals-speed-of-solar-wind-stripping-martian-atmosphere
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Curiosity's view of the rugged hills of Mars. Imaged late yesterday (Sol 1153 • Nov 3)
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