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Mark Davis
Works at Google
Attended Stanford: PhD, MA
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Triple Pendulum Control

A few years ago Dr. Tobias Glück from Technische Universität Wien, found that along with his mathematical insights, computers and numerical methods were now fast enough to swing-up and balance a pendulum, on a pendulum, on pendulum on a sliding rail under computer control.

IEEE CSS Video Clip Contest 2014 Submission

Triple Pendulum on a Cart (YT ~1 min.): https://goo.gl/XkKxHL


The presented work deals with the swing-up of the triple pendulum on a cart. The swing-up maneuver is accomplished within a two-degrees-of-freedom control scheme consisting of a nonlinear feedforward controller and an optimal feedback controller. Based on a precise mathematical model, the feedforward controller was obtained by solving a nonlinear two-point boundary value problem with free parameters. A time-variant Riccati Controller was developed in order to stabilize the system along the nominal trajectory and an Extended Kalman Filter was used to estimate the non-measurable states. The overall control strategy for the swing-up maneuver was successfully implemented and tested on an experimental test bench. Up to the authors’ knowledge, this is the first contribution so far providing numerical and experimental results of the swing-up maneuver for a triple pendulum on a cart.

Paper (open pdf): https://goo.gl/oT1cQY

Tobias Glück: https://goo.gl/RZtSte


Here is an easy to follow and graphic explanation of Kalman filters due to Tim Babb, who lives in the San Francisco Bay Area, and is Lighting Optimization Lead for Pixar Animation Studios.

Related Post: https://goo.gl/5X2ZpV

Image: https://goo.gl/nt6jPW
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In 1989 I was impressed by the single pendulum one in Deutsches Museum, Munich. This is mind blowing!
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Don't waste your time on petitions to "Abolish the Electoral College"...this is how you can actually help ensure future Presidents are elected by popular vote: 
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Why support a candidate who rejects your preferences and offends your opinions? Don’t do it for her—do it for the republic, and the Constitution.
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The long boom after World War II left Americans with unrealistic expectations, but there’s no going back to that unusual Golden Age
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Planning a move to a city abroad? Keep reading for a breakdown of the cities with the best quality of life globally.Every year Mercer publish a report on the best cities for expats to live in. While aimed at employers, the data is incredibly useful for anyone with a plan to move abroad. It answers ...
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A mistake in the article: "Australia's biggest city is one of only two cities on the list in English speaking nations", but I seem to remember speaking English in Vancouver...

I then checked, and here is the language breakdown:

5 German: Vienna, Zurich, Munich, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt
3 English: Auckland, Vancouver, Sydney
1 Danish: Copenhagen
1 French: Geneva

Curiosities:
• Only 1 non-germanic language city on their list.
• I can understand using the customary English forms Munich and Geneva (instead of München and Genève), but why keep the umlaut in Düsseldorf but not in Zürich?
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Originally published on Think Progress. By Marlene Cimons Conservatives who dismiss science might see climate change differently if exposed to messages that evoke the more verdant past rather than an apocalyptic future, according to a new study. [caption id=
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The news about Nazis in DC may have hidden some of the most important stories brewing about the new administration. This one may prove to have some of the most serious consequences. Trump wants to eliminate NASA's Earth Science division, one of the foremost institutions in the world studying the state of our planet. This team has key responsibilities in lofting the satellites which give us a view of what's happening around us – as well as being one of the world's best groups of climate modeling.

Eliminating the division would both disband one of the best such teams in the world, and eliminate nearly $2B of funding from the subject, costing hundreds (or more) of jobs across the field, and likely most affecting the careers of young researchers – with huge consequences for the field's future, just as it is becoming ever-more critical. (Remember that the Arab Spring was triggered by droughts in Asia and the Middle East, and the current massive surge in temperatures in the Arctic – it's currently 36°F above normal! – are going to have tremendous consequences. There's a reason the DoD considers this a top strategic priority.)

More chillingly still, the justification for this is that he calls their work "politicized science" – which is to say, "science which is politically inconvenient for him." We've seen a similar game in which Congress has banned any medical or epidemiological research on guns, because of the NRA's (probably justified) fear that the results of even the most trivial research would harm their political goals.* (Pro tip: if you know that anyone seriously looking at a question will come up with answers that hurt your goals, this may mean your goals are shady.)

There's actually a name for this sort of thing: Lysenkoism, named after Soviet agriculture director Trofim Lysenko. Lysenko considered genetics to be politically unfavorable to Communism, because if traits are inherent, then they can't be improved by the government, and that would make all sorts of parts of the Five-Year Plan obviously infeasible. With Stalin's enthusiastic support, all funding for research which disagreed with this was cut. (And this being Stalin, researchers who disagreed were shipped to Siberia) It was replaced by a rather bizarre official theory in which, for example, rye could be turned into wheat, and exposing wheat seeds to high humidity and low temperature would "teach" them and their descendants to grow in the winter.

The thing about science is that it's about asking questions and noting what's happening in the world around you. You don't get to make theories up and just say that the world is so; all you can do is describe what's actually observed, and try to figure out if you can predict what will happen next. That is, science is descriptive, it's not normative.

And that means that science is about things that keep happening, whether you believe in them or not. Unlike saying "I don't believe in fairies!," you can say "this wheat will grow in Siberia!" as often as you like, and the wheat still isn't going to grow there. That's the problem with Lysenkoism: it's based on pretending that nature works some way, and threatening anyone who dares to disagree with you, but nature doesn't really care. It will keep doing what it was doing before, and all that happens is that you've decided to be officially blind to it.

You do this with how crops work, and you end up with unexpected famines. You do this with how climate works, and you end up with unexpected droughts, floods, spreads of new diseases, and all sorts of fun and exciting things, because it turns out that the weather is still pretty important in our lives and you do not fuck with the laws of physics.

I say this with confidence: I was a physicist myself, am currently an engineer, and so if anyone is qualified to make a snappy answer to "Ye cannae the laws of physics, Jim!" it's probably me. But sorry: if your politics would be harmed by people being aware of reality, then all that means is that (a) your politics are apparently based on lying to people, and (b) at some point or another you are going to get a rude introduction to reality, which will not be good for either your politics or your constituents-slash-victims.

* Before anyone uses this as an excuse to go on a rant: I'm not anti-gun at all, and rather enjoy shooting. But there's a huge space between the Second Amendment and the sort of lunacy that the NRA has gotten infatuated with, where any restriction on a person's right to own a GBU-31 JDAM is tantamount to treason. And things like legally barring doctors from asking people if they have a gun in the house – even though, for example, that's a serious risk factor of death if anyone in the house is suffering from serious depression or similar illnesses – is just sacrificing human lives on the altar of their own political expediency. Seriously, fuck those guys.
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Market forces, not environmental regulations, have doomed coal.
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In which the author of Spoiler Alerts apologizes to readers for obsessing about the 2016 presidential election.
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And now the election is finally over hope you ain't so obsessed again @ mark dav...are you a Republican ?
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Noto in the news! Congrats to the fonts team!

More information:
https://www.google.com/get/noto/

And it's all open-source, including lots of great font tooling:
https://github.com/googlei18n?tab=repositories
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Cool.
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There's a website now to learn more about Google Research Europe (based in Zurich, Switzerland):
http://research.google.com/teams/gre/

Among other things, features our internationalization work, e.g. name transliteration for Knowledge Graph & Translate, as well as the open-source work on Unicode & Fonts!
About our work. Google Research, Europe is an environment where software engineers and researchers specialising in machine learning have the opportunity to develop products and conduct research in our Zürich office, as part of the wider efforts at Google. We solve big challenges across a range ...
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Mark's Collections
Work
Occupation
Google Software Engineer, Unicode (President & cofounder)
Employment
  • Google
    Lead int’l SW, present
  • IBM
  • Taligent
  • Apple
  • Systime, AG (Zürich)
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Introduction
I've been working for Google since the start of 2006. A wonderful company to work at—really sharp people doing fascinating (and useful) work. I transferred to our Zürich office at the start of 2013, and am enjoying living and working in Switzerland (reviving my schwiizertüütsch a bit).

More personally, some of my interests include traveling, films, books (SF, economics), and stealth video games (Dishonored 2!); am also a bit of a foodie.

A techie website is at www.macchiato.com; with a conference bio.
Bragging rights
Co-founded Unicode, and president of the Unicode consortium from the start. Also founded related open-source efforts: ICU and CLDR, and was responsible for the original Java i18n (java.text). These technologies have been crucial to getting software and the web to handle languages all over the globe. Together with numerous people, got Emoji into Unicode. Originated the term “patent troll” (http://goo.gl/NO6aHH)
Education
  • Stanford: PhD, MA
  • UCI: BA
  • University of California, Irvine
    1970 - 1973
  • Stanford University
    1973 - 1979
Mark Davis's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Not Just Emoji
blog.unicode.org

Every programmer knows about Unicode. Most other people have no idea what it is, even though they use Unicode every day. Every character you

Unicode 9.0 Candidate Characters
blog.unicode.org

The Unicode Consortium has accepted 7 new emoji characters as candidates for Unicode 9.0, scheduled for release in mid-2016. This makes a to

Europe’s Hidden Wine Gem - WSJ
www.wsj.com

From left, 2013 Domaine des Muses Petite Arvine Tradition; 2013 Henri BadouxAigle Les Murailles; 2011 Domaine de Muses Euterpe Séduction Bla

The End of a Treasure in Tokyo
www.nytimes.com

The Okura, almost surreal in its beauty and a favorite of stars for decades, will be demolished to make way for new towers.

Unicode 9.0 Candidate Emoji
blog.unicode.org

The Unicode Consortium has accepted 38 emoji characters as candidates for Unicode 9.0, scheduled for release in mid-2016. At this point, the

Unicode 9.0: 38 Kandidaten für die nächste Emoji-Welle
www.mobiflip.de

Die nächste Erweiterung des Emoj-Standards steht für Mitte 2016 an und wird vermutlich auch Symbole für Selfie und Bacon mit sich bringen. .

The emoji diversity lobby
www.yahoo.com

Inside the fierce campaigns to bring gingers and greater diversity to the world of emojis.

Watch Elon Musk deliver the best tech keynote I've ever seen
www.theverge.com

I've watched a lot of handsomely paid CEOs get on stages for keynote presentations over the past decade, and none were as good as the one I

How to Tell Someone's Age When All You Know Is Her Name
fivethirtyeight.com

Picture Mildred, Agnes, Ethel and Blanche. Perhaps you imagine the Golden Girls or your grandmother’s poker game. These are names for women

Kiosk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org

A kiosk (from Turkish: köşk, which in turn comes from Persian: kūshk‎) is a small, separated garden pavilion open on some or all sides. Kios

The silent minority
www.economist.com

ON A snow-covered bluff overlooking the Sheboygan river stands the Waelderhaus, a faithful reproduction of an Austrian chalet. It was built

Fox News Apologizes for False Claims of Muslim-Only Areas in England and...
www.nytimes.com

Fox News issued a correction on supposed “no-go zones” in Europe off-limits to non-Muslims after stirring a wave of outrage and derision.

Crowded
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
Food: GoodDecor: GoodService: Good
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
The service was excellent, the staff was very friendly, and the food very good, both the main courses (monkfish and schnitzel), the sides, and the desserts. The prices are comparable to other Zürich restaurants of the same level.
Food: Very GoodDecor: ExcellentService: Excellent
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
19 reviews
Map
Map
Map
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
Food: Very GoodDecor: Very GoodService: Good
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago