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Mark David
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Author of The Elements
Author of The Elements

5,255 followers
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Hrómundar saga Gripssonar - or Rómund Grippson's saga is a legendary saga from Iceland.

In the saga, Hrómundr serving king Óláf King of Warriors (Óláfr Liðsmannakonung) and Hrómund's battles with the berserker Hröngvið, as well as the undead witch-king Þráinn, a draugr (he was a former king of Gaul, Valland). Þráinn had killed 420 men, including the Swedish king Semingr, with his enchanted sword Mistletoe (Mistilteinn.)

History
The original version has been lost, but its content has been preserved in the 'rimes' or rímur of Hrómundr Gripsson, known as Griplur, which were probably composed in the first half of the 14th century, but appeared in print in 1896 in Fernir forníslenzkar rímnaflokkar.
These rímur were the basis for Hrómunds saga which is found in the 17th-century MS of the Arnamagnæan Manuscript Collectio

read more on:
https://medium.com/creating-the-elements/the-saga-of-hromund-gripsson-b7a3de05ccfc

#viking #legends #sagas
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The Elven Star Ëarendel and the #Norse

SOURCES FOR THE SHINING LIGHT OF THE SILMARIL THAT HAD BEEN RESCUED FROM THE THE NORTHERN LANDS OF ANGBAND BY THE ELVISH-MAN COUPLE LÚTHIEN AND BEREN.

Read more on:
https://elementamundi.com/earendilandthenorse/
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And so began the journey of chaos into the future.

#storyidea

Mankind turns a blind eye to the demographic effects of global warming.
Poor desperate people do desperate things: Thus was the beginning of the tidal wave of illegal immigration from the African continent into Europe.
Grenoble, France - African and Arab immigrants as usual
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For the ancient Scandinavians, death was part of life. Norse society was based on a system of belief concerning the dead, and the gods who ruled the realms between which man passed in life and death.
The first volume of the Viking Legends and Norse Mythology series covers the traditions concerning the living undead, tracing the beliefs of the Scandinavian, Northern Germanic and Anglo-Saxon Norse, set amidst the backdrop of Viking and pre-Viking folk superstition. This book arises from much of the source material gathered over the years, part of my quest to write ‘The Lord Of The Rings in the real world’, to envisage and realize a hard-boiled world as anything from fantasy.
In this volume 1, I explore different aspects of life, death and the Norse afterlife, exploring beliefs, superstitions, relating the deeds of heroes and gods, related to the body of body that each day, is added to the net. I hope there is something here for everyone, and where it has been possible, I have provided notes and links to original sources so this publication becomes itself an evolving database of stories, sources of inspiration as well as online sources for going deeper. I kickoff with Helheim, the realm of the dead for all those who were no warriors.
Much use has been made of original sources, many quotes presented to inform the understanding of the many different subjects presented in this publication, and more importantly, used as a resource, being linked to so readers are able to access the continuous ‘collective works in progress.’ I weave together my understandings with those of others, providing links in the text to wikipedia articles.

Read book on:
https://elementamundi.com/viking-norse-series/vn-volume1/
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The real Edoras

THE ROYAL RESIDENCE AT LEIRE

No other royal residence can in the least compare with Leire, according to the witness of heroic lays. Jaelling is mentioned once by Saxo in connection with Offa and Vermund, and Jselling Heath (Jalangrs heiHr) in the Icelandic story of the Peace of Frothi. In the lays, it occurs not at all. In a single Icelandic passage Ringsted (Hringstaftir) is mentioned as the seat of Frothi the Famous (hinn fragi). Sigersted (Sigarsstaftir) is properly the residence of the race of Sigar.* But what is that against the long line of kings in Leire, away back to the remotest antiquity, with the many events from the time of the Peace of Frothi until Hrolf's fall, with its royal sepulchres and all the splendor of the "Leire kings" and the "Leire throne," these strong expressions of the unity and power of the Danish people? The very oldest written account agrees entirely with the passages cited. The German historian Thietmar of Merseburg, writing in the beginning of the eleventh century, relates as follows about the heathen practices of the Danes:

"There is a place in those regions which is the capital of the realm, called Lederun, in that part of the country which is called Selon where, every ninth year, in the month of January, somewhat later than our Christian Yuletide, they assemble together and sacrifice to their gods 99 men and as many horses, dogs, and cocks or (?) hawks, believing that these will be of service to them in the realm of the dead and atone for their misdeeds." There can be no doubt that Selon here represents Zealand (Old Norse Selund) and that Lederun stands for Leire (Old Norse at Hleiftrum, Old Danish at *Ledhrum)."

In other words, all investigations undertaken on the spot lead us to reject in every respect the conception of the situation of Leire which is found in the written documents.

Which of the two kinds of sources are we to believe? The testimony of old songs and legends is of course not the very best argument when a definite historictopographic problem is to be settled. But how about Thietmar's statement concerning the great sacrifices which were offered up at Leire? Is it permissible to rely on him, and to declare the arguments of the archaeologists to be without force?

Thietmar has the air of being well informed, but we shall have to call a good deal of his description in question. First of all, it is incorrect for him to mention these sacrifices as taking place in his own time, for they had not been made for some fifty or sixty years before his day, and were therefore known only by hearsay. In the second place, we can see, by comparing his data with Adam of Bremen's description of Upsala, that the details are about right, to be sure, but that the numbers seem greatly exaggerated. Considering that the entire Swedish people sacrificed nine men in their great offerings, it sounds incredible that the Danes should under the same conditions have sacrificed ninety-nine. Very possibly the entire number of sacrificial animals reached that size. Most important of all, however, is the circumstance that the localization of the sacrifice in Leire is by no means as certain as has been thought. During recent years, Thietmar's own manuscript of the Chronicon has been examined, and it has been possible to understand the entire history of its origin. He began writing it in 1012, when he probably wrote the greater part of Book I, including the passage where the heathen practices of the Danes are mentioned; he then continued, until the whole work was ready, in 1018. In 1016 he completed the first book, after having obtained several new sources and made marginal glosses on what he had written before. The passage about the Danish sacrifices did not originally contain the name of Leire. It read only: "There is a place in that region, the capital of the realm, where they assemble every ninth year, in the month of January, later than our Christian Yuletide, and sacrifice to their gods," etc. When going over his work, later, he made a little addition to the word "capital," adding the words " called Leire, in the district of Zealand." In the course of the years intervening he had received information concerning Denmark and the battles of Canute the Great. It is very likely that he learned only then that Leire was the name of the royal Danish residence.

Considering all this, Thietmar's chronicle cannot claim the authority of contemporary testimony grounded on first-hand observation. His information is made up of legendary traditions worked together by a man who was not gifted with any special insight into the matter. In other words, his testimony is of the same kind as all the other traditions or songs about the renown inseparably connected with the name of Leire during the Viking Age. And it is the rule that tradition and monuments offer contradictory evidence in this respect.


http://www.germanicmythology.com/works/Lejretemple.html
The Temple at Lejre, Denmark
The Temple at Lejre, Denmark
germanicmythology.com
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Can there really be so few story plots as this article outlines?
I dont really buy into this - but the article is very interesting and the graphic based on 'sentiment score' has a simple logic to it.
http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20180525-every-story-in-the-world-has-one-of-these-six-basic-plots
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The Ynglingar

In any mythology, even fictitious ones as we know from Tolkien, there is always an origin, a source or a historical reference, no matter how fragile. We haven’t even begun to unravel the distant threads in time that has lead to the creation of the Norse Mythological pantheon, and if we needed the right place to begin, then it begins here, with the royal house of the Ynglings, called the Ynglingar. Perhaps, it is an impossible task, since Historians often added fable to fantasy and fantasy to fable to lend credence to the myths held to be all pervasive in Viking times. And yet, there exist fragments, glimpses into possibility that connections existing across bloodlines that stretched farther back than we can know with any certainty, since no records exist to tell fact from fiction.

Read more on:
https://elementamundi.com/the-ynglingar/
The Ynglingar
The Ynglingar
elementamundi.com
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Myths of Creation
In Norse mythology, Ragnarök is a series of future events, including a great battle foretold to ultimately result in the death of a number of major figures (including the gods Odin, Thor, Týr, Freyr, Heimdallr, and Loki), the occurrence of various natural disasters, and the subsequent submersion of the world in water.

Hang on a minute, isnøt it the same with Egyptian mythology?
Read more on: https://wp.me/p7PupP-cA

#nordicmythology #elementamundi
Myths of Creation
Myths of Creation
elementamundi.wordpress.com
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