Profile

Cover photo
Verified name
Mark Atwood
Works at Hewlett-Packard
Attended University of Utah
Lives in Seattle, WA
5,762 followers
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Mark Atwood

Shared publicly  - 
 
Uber​'s service is great.

Their mobile apps, need a deep clean and refactor.
Someone on their developer leadership needs to:
1) stop putting blocking calls on the UI thread
2) stop doing stuff in the foreground that doesn't need foreground attention,
3) especially the startup
4) and stop waiting for the background to acknowledge a rating
5) put the data stream on a serious diet
6) especially on startup
7) put the app itself on a serious diet, the thing is huge, and wants too much memory for what it does.

How about they publish a stable UI, and offer prizes for open source clients?   Nah, the VCs would have a case of vapors...
1
Matthew Ringel's profile photoMark Atwood's profile photo
2 comments
 
Matt, fixed, I said it wrong.
Add a comment...

Mark Atwood

Shared publicly  - 
 
A temporary mistake
I don't care about business models, I care about applications, and at true billion user trillion device scale the only scaling pattern that succeeds is user visible federation. Email, the DNS, the HTML/HTTP hyperlink, XMPP, and the blockchain have no rent s...
1
Add a comment...

Mark Atwood

Shared publicly  - 
 
The "Internet Security Task Force" is a backroom lobbying sleazy consortium of movie studios, who are trying to cause confusion with their name to steal legitimacy from the much-more-respected not-corporate-lobby-group Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). 
7
Add a comment...

Mark Atwood

Shared publicly  - 
 
What I would look like on The Simpsons, by eliana93fer on +Fiverr 
7
Robert Poole's profile photo
 
Not a bad rendition!
Add a comment...

Mark Atwood

Shared publicly  - 
 
The current architectural style seems to be to make the building look like it was built out of shipping containers stacked up in a junkyard.
1
Jasper Janssen's profile photo
 
Some buildings are made by stacking shipping containers, although I don't think this is one of them.
Add a comment...

Mark Atwood

Shared publicly  - 
 
The current archtectural style seems to be to make the building look like it was built out of shipping containers stacked up in a junkyard.
1
Jason DeTiberus's profile photoJasper Janssen's profile photo
2 comments
 
This seems to have posted twice?
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
5,762 people
Gioele's profile photo
Damon Jones's profile photo
DatSyn News's profile photo
Robert Cram's profile photo
David Van Couvering's profile photo
Brandon Poe's profile photo
Steve Wingard's profile photo
Yousef Khalid's profile photo
Arun Haridas's profile photo

Mark Atwood

Shared publicly  - 
 
Worth rereading and pondering on a regular basis: Gell-Mann Amnesia Effect, by Michael Crichton.

Media carries with it a credibility that is totally undeserved.  You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward–reversing cause and effect. I call these the “wet streets cause rain” stories. Paper’s full of them.

In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story – and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read with renewed interest as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about far-off Palestine than it was about the story you just read.

In ordinary life, if somebody consistently exaggerates or lies to you, you soon discount everything they say. In court, there is the legal doctrine of falsus in uno, falsus in omnibus, which means untruthful in one part, untruthful in all.

But when it comes to the media, we believe against evidence that it is probably worth our time to read other parts of the paper. When, in fact, it almost certainly isn’t.

(Update, and personal note: if you think this applies to Fox News but not to NPR, or vice versa, that it applies to media outlets of the other tribe but not to your own, I will fairly and correctly judge you to be an idiot.)
1
Peter da Silva's profile photoNick Alcock's profile photo
2 comments
 
It certainly applies to the Economist, one of the most respected papers out there. Whenever they discuss politics their usual assumptions (that markets are preferable to non-markets, for instance) lead them wildly astray and end up with them assuming that of course software patents must be good because you can have a market in them! They are slowly learning that maybe markets in the right to restrict people from doing things are not necessarily unmitigatedly wonderful things... (it helps to point out that said 'markets' are artificial government constructs that were -- in the UK, at least, which has none of this 'progress of science and the useful arts' stuff -- promulgated purely to protect producers, and wasn't the Economist founded to protest against the Corn Laws?)

Now, they're one of my primary news sources, but if they're that wrong in that area, how wrong are they elsewhere? Are they led astray by anything other than their nailed-to-the-mast 'markets good' rule? How could I tell? (In some areas it's obvious. They thought that the Iraq War was just wonderful, although it tore their journalists apart down the middle. They seem to think that our current government is going to be tolerable, too, which is at odds even with their most recent leaders before the election...)
Add a comment...

Mark Atwood

Shared publicly  - 
 
It's time to repost my general review of Ayn Rand:

Her writing is turgid, her fanclub is tiresome, her plots are simplistic, her heroes are as thin and flat as a sheet of paper, and her personal life has almost nothing worthy of emulation or respect.

However, the villains of her stories are perfect portrayals lifted from real life. Read her stuff only for the purpose of being able to recognize the Randian villains who infest the real world.

My main use of her work is to see how people object to her. I always learn far more about the objector than they mean to reveal, and rarely is it flattering.
6
Peter da Silva's profile photoNick Alcock's profile photo
2 comments
 
Not so sure that the villains are real. They're cardboard cutouts who do evil for the sake of doing evil. Nobody in the real world is like that. Nobody. Not even Hitler woke up and thought "I'll do evil today!"

Actually, I'd say they're very like your average fundie's portrayal of an atheist: someone who believes as fervently as the fundie does, but wants to do the opposite (i.e. believes in God but hates him). In exactly the same way, Rand's villains, ISTM, believed in the same thing as her heroes but lied about it because they got a kick out of just plain being evil.

And that's, well, more or less as plausible as the rest of her writing. :/
Add a comment...

Mark Atwood

Shared publicly  - 
 
Apple is insisting that iOS application developers break #OAuth security to make mobile app login look sexy: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/oauth/xo9V5-qWBjY
10.6 - Apple and our customers place a high value on simple, refined, creative, well thought through interfaces. They take more work but are worth it. Apple sets a high bar. If your user interface is complex or less than very good, it may be rejected. I'm thinking this is crazy ...
2
Robert Poole's profile photoIrreverent Monk's profile photo
2 comments
 
How does google do it? I have noticed that if I download one Google app, login and use it, and then download other google apps, they are automatically logged in...
Add a comment...

Mark Atwood

Shared publicly  - 
 
Steve Wozniak at Percona Live 2015
2
Add a comment...

Mark Atwood

Shared publicly  - 
 
Looking down at the i-90 floating bridge
2
Add a comment...

Mark Atwood

Shared publicly  - 
 
A useful essay on "whatever happened to the George Jetson 2 hour workday", or more formally, John Maynard Keynes' essay "Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren".  Keynes got many things wrong, and this is one of them, and here is a good explanation why:

Employers have incentives to not hire workers who will work for less of the week, e.g., because of costs associated with hiring more workers and ensuring their productivity.  This is definitely true for high-skill, long-term workers because of overhead effects. Assume it takes six months of full-time (40 hr/wk) effort for a new employee to get up to speed on whatever task or project they are working. And then ten hours a week to keep track of what everyone else on the project is doing, maintain currency in their professional skills, keep up with the literature, and of course complete the mandatory sexual-harassment prevention training, ethics training, desert tortoise awareness training, etc.

If I hire one person to work forty hours a week for five years under such conditions, I get 7,020 hours of productive work. If I hire two people to work twenty hours a week for five years, I get a total of 4,160 hours of productive work. That’s 40% less productivity for the same cost; I really need to hire 3.375 half-time workers to replace one full-time.

And that assumes that the “keep track of what everyone else on the project is doing” overhead is constant. If I’ve got three-and-change times as many people working on the project, that’s more people everyone has to talk to in order to understand what is going on. Probably an extra layer of management. More desert-tortoise awareness training staff, because I can’t train each person half or a third as much.

But if I can get my people to work 60 hours a week, that’s 12,130 hours of productivity from one man over five years. I will about break even even if I have to pay time-and-a-half for overtime – which I maybe don’t if the guy is a salaried employee. And I can start cutting down on overhead and run a generally leaner project team.

Where labor is not a commodity, where specific skills and knowledge and connections matter, you want the right man for the job and you want that man on the job right up to the edge of burnout.

And if you’re asking to work 20 hours a week so you have time to raise your children, play golf, or whatever, understand that you are not offering one-third of what the 60 hr/wk overachiever is providing, you’re offering maybe one-sixth. This will be reflected in the salary and benefits you can negotiate, but it may be camouflaged (e.g. half the nominal full-time salary for a lower-ranked position, no insurance or pension, no bonuses or promotions).

// John Schilling, writing at Slate Star Codex
3
Add a comment...
Story
Tagline
Director of Open Source Engagement for HP, Resident of Seattle
Introduction
I meet interesting people and learn interesting stuff, and then introduce them all to each other.

I regularly commit autodidactism.

I have demolished a house with a crowbar while wearing a business suit.

I am an introverted people watcher, yet I enjoy public speaking.

I pay attention. I listen, I watch, and I learn.

I drink red wine, green tea, and dark beer.

I love the feel of a smooth nib against good paper, because thoughts and images have to go into books, as well as come from them.

Work
Occupation
Open Source & Open Standards Advocate
Employment
  • Hewlett-Packard
    Director, 2012 - present
  • Red Hat Software
    Developer Evangelist, 2011 - 2012
    I travelled extensively to speak to audiences ranging from small users groups and meetups and classrooms, up to conference audiences of thousands of attendees. I helped develop relationships with other technology projects and open source projects. I wrote demos and created blog content. I marketed the power of open source practices internally and externally, and helped external community members make useful contributions to open source projects.
  • Eucalyptus Systems
    Community Manager, 2010 - 2011
    I travelled extensively to speak to audiences and conferences about the Eucalyptus cloud-computing technology. I managed and promoted recognition and engagement with the the project's community of users and developers.
  • MySQL
    Senior Professional Services Consultant, 2007 - 2008
    Professional Services consulting for users of MySQL, concentrating on custom storage engines, specialized server patches, and MySQL User Defined Functions. I travelled extensively to clients' worksites. I worked closely with client web developers, DBAs, IT staff, and project managers, often under conditions of high stress. I worked in a remote distributed manner, while collaborating via email, IRC, phone, Skype, Wiki & XMPP Instant Message.
  • Digeo
    Senior Software Developer, 2001 - 2006
    Responsible for networking features for a Linux based networked consumer appliance (security, iptables, PCMCIA, USB, hotplug). Implemented key parts of a IPTV client (HDTV MPEG over multicast IP). I drove the configuration and management of a custom computing Xen-based grid running DistCC.
  • F5 Networks
    Test Engineer, 2000 - 2000
    Complex, automated, and ad hoc testing of an internet appliance. Wrote new automation test frameworks. Wrote network fault injection and simulation plugins for Linux iptables. Added protocol dissectors to Ethereal Wireshark.
  • Ampersand
    Software Developer, 1996 - 1999
    Wrote SNMP subagents. Wrote a translator for a proprietary telephony control language into Java. Designed, implemented, tested, debugged and documented large software systems. Very large, complex, and advanced Perl development environment. Held a US DOD clearance.
  • HomeStar Communications
    System and Network Administrator, 1996 - 1996
    Provided short-term and long-term expertise for customers on maintenance contracts and on a billed per-hour basis. All aspects of WAN/LAN integration, UNIX, X-Windows, TCP/IP, routers. Customers included ISPs, Internet Transit Providers, and business offices running UNIX, Windows, and Netware. Experience in crisis situations, rapid troubleshooting, telephone and remote network support, and customer relations. Innovated interfacing Web servers and SQL servers in 1995. Installed, configured, and administered Oracle8 and Sybase. Programmed using Oracle OCI, Perl modules, Delphi C/S, CGI, and custom modified HTTP servers. Ran seminars, one on one training, press interviews, and pre-sales for customers, executives, and the press in "internet", "web servers", and "HTML".
  • A&M Networking
    Principal System Administrator & Architect, 1996 - 1996
    Provided short-term and long-term expertise for customers on maintenance contracts and on a billed per-hour basis. All aspects of WAN/LAN integration, UNIX, X-Windows, TCP/IP, routers. Customers included ISPs, Internet Transit Providers, and business offices running UNIX, Windows, and Netware. Experience in crisis situations, rapid troubleshooting, telephone and remote network support, and customer relations. Innovated interfacing Web servers and SQL servers in 1995. Installed, configured, and administered Oracle8 and Sybase. Programmed using Oracle OCI, Perl modules, Delphi C/S, CGI, and custom modified HTTP servers. Ran seminars, one on one training, press interviews, and pre-sales for customers, executives, and the press in "internet", "web servers", and "HTML".
  • WBK Controls
    Lead Software Developer, 1992 - 1995
    Implemented several embedded systems, mostly for USAF military contracts. Responsible for all phases of software specification and design. Primarily responsible for all custom software, including design, coding, testing, and documentation. Participated in formal design and engineering reviews. Adhered to formal standards, including MIL-STD-2167A. Languages used were Ada, C, and assembly (68HC11) on UNIX workstations and embedded processors. User interfaces to automated test control systems. Very low level hardware interfaces, timing and bit twiddling.
  • Sun Microsystems
    Senior Technology Advisor, 2008 - 2009
    I participated in design and value reviews of existing and proposed internal and external technologies, and their usefulness in Sun's cloud technology initiatives. I reported directly to the Sun Cloud CTO. I contributed work to a number of open source projects, with the goal of integrating them with Sun's offerings.
  • Gear6
    Director of Community Development, 2009 - 2010
    This was a director level position. I directed all aspects of community management for the company in general, for the company's contributions to external open source projects, and for growing the community of those projects themselves. I worked with non-employee community developers, and with the developers and staff of other organizations that were engaged in the same projects. I helped manage publicity and tech press engagement for the projects. I interacted directly with PR firms, event organizers, well-known reporters and editors in the technology press, spoke at conferences, and participated in relevant online forums. I also managed the flow of bugs and patches between the company fork and the community versions of the Memcached. I drove the successful and profitable effort to port the company's products to Amazon Web Services.
  • Sun Microsystems
    Professional Services Solution Architect, 2008 - 2008
    Professional Services consulting for users of MySQL, concentrating on custom storage engines, specialized server patches, and MySQL User Defined Functions. I travelled extensively to clients' worksites. I worked closely with client web developers, DBAs, IT staff, and project managers, often under conditions of high stress.
  • Eucalyptus Systems Inc.
    Community Manager, 2010 - 2011
    I travelled extensively to speak to audiences and conferences about the Eucalyptus cloud-computing technology. I managed and promoted recognition and engagement with the the project's community of users and developers.
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Seattle, WA
Previously
Boston, MA - Salt Lake City, UT - Alaska - Kings Mountain, NC
Contact Information
Work
Phone
+1 360-212-9721
Mobile
+1 206-473-7118
Email
Jabber
mark.atwood@hp.com
Address
701 Pike St, Ste 900 Seattle WA 98122-3719